Why are so many people reluctant of PRS's?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Boogeyman, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. Boogeyman

    Boogeyman New Member

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    Since i'm here with a bunch of PRS "believers" LOL, I might as well ask if any of you have noticed the same thing in people that I have. They see and or play my guitars and say they LOVE them, then they turn around and buy a gibson or fender? I am the only one of all the freinds I have that plays PRS's. I know they're expensive, but any guitar of this caliber is expensive. I bought both of mine used and saved a big chunk of change, so I dont know if price is really the factor. People i know just seem to be reluctant to even consider PRS and I dont understand it?
     
  2. Boogeyman

    Boogeyman New Member

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    ...As I hit "submit" I think, "All I really want to own is PRS", so maybe thats the way others feel about their Fenders and Gibsons I guess?...You can lead a horse to water but you cant mak'em drink it
     
  3. Sekunda

    Sekunda Music is life

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    Good question... I have experienced this as well and have no explanation for it. Maybe some are scared of the stigma of owning a "quality" guitar... Hehe. Jokes aside, my friends all love my PRS guitars yet never buy one when they pick up something new as well... I guess you stick with what you know. I would pick up a Les Paul but can't find one with a neck that's comfortable to me. So I stick with these. Plus I have a PRS amp now as well... What does that say about me? Fanboy? Or quality driven?
    :rock:
     
  4. SausageofPower

    SausageofPower New Member

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    Eh, some people think of PRS as more of a boutique brand. Also, the original signature artists weren't everyone's cup of tea (Santana, Schon, etc.). So, unless you've been keeping up, you've got no reason to know that PRS has been expanding. Now they cover more of the hard rock and metal genre, which should pull in more people. Also, their SE line is the best for imports. As they continue to diversify their lineup and endorsees, they should be more viable to everyday players. Not to mention, with Fender and Gibson having questionable QC...
     
  5. markie

    markie Zombie 27 - DFZ

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    I'm not reluctant :biggrin:
     
  6. south89

    south89 New Member

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    I'm with Markie I ain't scared as a matter of fact its all I own . Oh except for one tele. I had a friend that was playing strats but he just got his first used SE 245 and its all he is playing now :beer:
     
  7. satchmo72

    satchmo72 New Member

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    I was reluctant to look at PRS previously due to cost (I cant afford to make a mistake) There is nothing wrong with a good strat or Les Paul but you know exactly what you are getting with those. PRS on the other hand is an expensive guitar that most have not had a chance to really play. I sat down in many different shops over the course of 2 years playing a whole bunch of different stuff. The only guitar out of all of the ones I played fit both the playability I was looking for along with the sound in my head that I wanted was the PRS. I figured if Dave Weiner could play with Vai and write his own stuff using a PRS, I could definitely make it work.
     
  8. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    I think it's because, to an astonishing degree, rock and roll stage performance is still a predictable set-piece with traditional rules laid down in the 50s and 60s. It's more predictable than an opera performance.

    Band dressed in hip subculture bad-ass costume, starting with Brando-Wild-Ones influenced garb from early 1950s. Stage moves by guitar player dating back to Chuck Berry, as later embellished by Hendrix/Townsend/etc. Iconic period guitar, preferably worn-looking. I could go on, but you get the basic idea. There is a "look", there are expectations. Whether these come from the audience's desires or not, I can't say.

    For people who care a lot about that kind of thing (you'd be surprised how many real-deal bands are all about it), a PRS isn't going to do, because it wasn't played in 1963. It's the wrong look. It's somewhat dressed-up. The beauty of the maple tops certainly influence the perception of the brand, since Miras and Starlas would be the right look in any dressed-down situation.

    Of course, an increasing number of artists are discovering that PRSes aren't only for looks. They sound great, and more are on big stages all the time.

    And from time to time, we see innovative stage performances. But mostly...Spinal Tap and more Spinal Tap... ;)
     
    #8 LSchefman, Nov 29, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  9. QueenCityGuitars

    QueenCityGuitars Vamanos Pest

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    In my experiences, guitar buyers tend fall into 3 generalized categories:

    1. They buy the guitar they think sounds, feels, and looks good.
    2. They buy the guitar their favorite guitarist plays.
    3. They buy the guitar that portrays an image they want their audience to perceive them to have.

    When I play my PRS guitars, I think they sound, feel, and look so good that I don't want to put them down. That's a good guitar to me.
     
  10. QueenCityGuitars

    QueenCityGuitars Vamanos Pest

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    I forgot the last category:

    4. They buy the guitar with the highest collector value/potential.
     
  11. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc Too Funky

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    Ding ding ding!
     
  12. themike

    themike New Member

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    I own 8 Maryland made Paul Reed Smith guitars ..... and 0 other brands. Why?

    Becuase I love the product, the company, the people and their values. No lies, no gimmicks and no marketing ploy - its just how I feel.

    Now excuse me while I go open the christmas card I just got from my guitar company in the mail :)
     
  13. Harker1440

    Harker1440 New Member

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    I think it also has alot to do with posted pricing of PRS guitars online and in stores. At my local GC you walk in the front doors and some of the first guitars you see are PRS hanging on the wall the cheapest is a $1000 Torero the next one is a $3000 SC245
    and past those are dozens of Fenders Gibsons Epis Squire Schecters Esp Jackson Ibanez guitars under $500, I heard one guy tell his son that if he won the powerball then he could afford one of the "High Dollar Rich peoples guitars" and he was pointing to a Ted SC Soapbar.
     
  14. rugerpc

    rugerpc A♥ hoards guitars ♥A Soldier 25, DFZ
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    [rant]
    Actually, this is wrong for the greater percent of the unwashed out there. Just walk into any big retailer like a GC and watch the interaction for a little while.

    Customers are actually steered to inferior guitars by the sales staff. The goal is to make a quick sale, not spend time with a customer and find out what they really want or suggest something to them that they have never considered - certainly not at the new price-point for a core PRS.

    I have watched both talented and decidedly untalented customers gravitate to the usual brands without ever even glancing at the PRSi on the wall. I have seen this to the point that I believe that the average guitar player doesn't even know what they really want.

    I was lucky. When I started playing, I had a friend introduce me to PRS very early on - long before I was even taking lessons.

    You may think that they are, but the salesperson is not your friend. It is possible that they may appear to be your friend once you spend enough in the store, or once you are there often enough that both you and they know what you are really looking for, but until then your are merely a mobile wallet support unit, and the goal is to extract cash as quickly as possible and then move on to the next wallet.

    [/rant]

    The solution is for you and your friends to shop local and in a smaller store. Get to know the owner and his staff and let them get to know you.
     
    #14 rugerpc, Nov 29, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  15. Michael B

    Michael B New Member

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    I was reluctant as well, had many gibsons and Jacksons and Deans. Always knew PRS guitars were sweet and started jamming with a guy from work who had a Artist custom 24 and I just loved how it played and felt and performed. Went without ever playing one and ordered my Tremonti and the love affair had begun! Having 3 Les Paul's I knew I wanted a singlecut and boy did I make a phenominal decision!!! It was like a Ferrari after the lesters...sold them and my 3 flying v's. Then I bought a Mira later and a SE 245 all upgraded with usa parts.....best guitars on the planet!!! Glad I finally played one and found everything I was looking for in a guitar!!!
     
  16. Mikegarveyblues

    Mikegarveyblues Cream Crackered

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    Psychology...

    For many their favourite players - their icons - played Strats, Tele's, SG's and Lp's, etc so that's what they gravitate towards. Do they dare to be a little different or do they go with the herd mentality?

    I suspect there's a lot of folks pull PRS's apart on certain forums when in actual fact they love them.

    Fender & Gibson have got decades on PRS. The 50's, 60's and 70's - perhaps the 80's where the golden age of guitar and Strats and LP's where King. People still hold onto that and PRS has been playing catch up ever since.

    It's quite clear that slowly but surely people are coming around.

    More and more people are trying out PRS's and liking what they hear and see and feel and... In quite a few cases... Accepting their beloved 'other brand' pales compared to the PRS they just bought.

    Artist endorsements are fairly important and perhaps PRS could do with a few more big names on the roster.

    Give it time. PRS are on the up and have been for a while.
     
  17. Boogie

    Boogie Zombie Two, DFZ

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    There's nothing wrong with being the best. I came to PRS because it is the best. And looking fantastic has nothing (<-- that's a lie!) to do with it...it's a fringe benefit. Even if they were Soapy McFuglies, I'd own 'em. It wasn't due to an artist endorsement (sorry Howie!), or the reviews in Guitar Player, it was because I went into a store and played a dozen of them, and every one was spectacular. Where else does this happen? Honestly, it only happens in a few other places (Porsche comes to mind) and aspiring to own those doesn't make you a douche. Treating others like they're subpar, does. If they prefer the other stuff, good for them.
     
  18. solacematt

    solacematt New Member

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    I want to also add ignorance to this as well. My all-time favorite band is Smashing Pumpkins, and their frontman, who is known for playing mainly strats and even has a Fender signature model. Though I'm sure his guitar is great, it doesn't feel right for me, nor does it sound right or play comfortably for me like a PRS does. A few weeks ago there was a gear discussion on the bands official board that sprang up in response to an interview the singer and co-guitarist did. PRS somehow came into mention and one person actually mentioned how they don't like the guitars because bands they don't like/think suck play them, such as quite a few mainstream bands. I of course defended PRS because 1. I thought the posters points were ignorant, and 2. because I honestly feel that the CU24 with the 5-way Rotary knob is the most versatile guitar I've ever played.
    A few weeks I was at band practice and showed my drummer the CU24 and introduced the rotary knob to him. He was flipping out. A few days later he was raving about it to the bandmates in the other band he plays in. How this guitar not only has it's own sound, but it can sound like an LP, a strat, a tele, just by turning this knob. I used to love Gibson guitars, but their quality control is horrible and they weigh way too much. PRS guitars are just so comfortable right out of the box. How can one argue with a quality instrument like that?
    By the way, I would totally love to see this happen, haha

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Mike Duncan

    Mike Duncan DGT Player

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    I live in the anti-prog rock world of punk and alternative...NONE of my bands dig on the PRS. I can't figure out why! The tone, price, playability far exceeds what some other companies, who I won't name, are cranking out.
     
  20. Twinfan

    Twinfan 408 Sig Club President

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    What does tone and playability have to do with punk??? :laugh:

    Seriously though, is it more about image in those scenes, and PRS just doesn't fit?
     

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