Photos, let's see 'em

Wakester

Re Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2018
Messages
4,011
Location
south western New York
Nice mustang. I host an event called the Ford Enthusiast Nationals and Shelbyfest Rally in Missouri every may, we have cars coming from about 30 states....come see us sometime. www.shelbyfest.net
I sold this one a few years back. I own a '15 V6 'vert now, same color. Once I retire, i will start traveling to the big shows, for now, I am just too busy.
 

]-[@n$0Ma☩!©

Zombie Zero, DFZ
Joined
Aug 1, 1985
Messages
7,119
Bob's Big Boy. North Fork Highway. Wapiti, Wyoming.

If you have a high-def monitor, fast internet, and want to see the 'big' file, click here.

i-v8MpRVD-X5.jpg
 

Daryl Jones

non-practicing pacifist
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
543
Location
Alberta Canada
Couple weeks ago when I was down racing, I mentioned the shoot with my fab friend Anett. I just got the full album now and here's a shot from that afternoon now that I'm set up with Imagur. Somehow the B&W does justice to the setting and myself as well. I'll post some others with my SE Custom in my hands when I get time to mess around on the pc at home.
 

Dancing Frog

Senior 513 Whore
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
619
Location
Odenton, Md
What is that?
That is a planetary nebula known as the Dumbbell Nebula.

A planetary nebula is what is left behind when a star the size of the sun dies. As the nuclear fuel in the core of a star is exhausted, a star will swell into red giant. Eventually, the radiation pressure from the diminishing nuclear fusion in the core is not enough to overcome the forces of gravity, and the core collapses into a white dwarf star. When that happens, the outer layers of the star are blown outward becoming the expanding bubble of gas shown in the photo. The interesting shapes inside the bubble are probably caused by the gravity of a binary companion of the original star.
 

Daryl Jones

non-practicing pacifist
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
543
Location
Alberta Canada
My bonsai hobby. The ficus is a double trunk specimen that is over 40 years old now, picked it up in a nursery in the early 80s, was about 10 years old then according to the shop staff. It's been re potted 3 times since I've had it, but it retains the dual trunk shape although the foliage sort of obscures that in the photo. Being a tropical species, it winters inside the house, but it does thrive outside in the summers. The Siberian elms I've had for just about 20 years now. 3 of them are in the "literati" style I mentioned in another post and the other is a group planting (simulates a miniature forest setting). The literati were originally planned to be formal or at worst case informal upright forms, but sometimes deciduous trees just don't conform to what you have planned so they were allowed to grow naturally with only simple pruning twice a year. They are true bonsai so they live outdoors all year round, they survive our harsh winters buried in their pot in my garden boxes to protect the roots from freezing. At one time I had a dozen trees, including larch and white spruce in formal and informal upright styles, and a gorgeous Azealia broom style but they eventually succumbed to the ravages of weather and age. They take constant mothering (they will dry out in as little as one day in high heat) to be healthy and vigorous, and summer vacations without daily care and watering can be deadly. People say they will babysit for you, but often fall short of the mark.:(

.
 

DISTORT6

NJ Devil
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
8,466
Location
New Jersey
My bonsai hobby. The ficus is a double trunk specimen that is over 40 years old now, picked it up in a nursery in the early 80s, was about 10 years old then according to the shop staff. It's been re potted 3 times since I've had it, but it retains the dual trunk shape although the foliage sort of obscures that in the photo. Being a tropical species, it winters inside the house, but it does thrive outside in the summers. The Siberian elms I've had for just about 20 years now. 3 of them are in the "literati" style I mentioned in another post and the other is a group planting (simulates a miniature forest setting). The literati were originally planned to be formal or at worst case informal upright forms, but sometimes deciduous trees just don't conform to what you have planned so they were allowed to grow naturally with only simple pruning twice a year. They are true bonsai so they live outdoors all year round, they survive our harsh winters buried in their pot in my garden boxes to protect the roots from freezing. At one time I had a dozen trees, including larch and white spruce in formal and informal upright styles, and a gorgeous Azealia broom style but they eventually succumbed to the ravages of weather and age. They take constant mothering (they will dry out in as little as one day in high heat) to be healthy and vigorous, and summer vacations without daily care and watering can be deadly. People say they will babysit for you, but often fall short of the mark.:(

.
Keep my wife far away from them. She has a black thumb and can kill plastic plants.
The Grim Reaper of foliage.
 
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