A Life In The Arts

László

Too Many Notes
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
34,970
Location
Michigan
As many here know, I started life in the arts, then went to law school, practiced law, and got back into the arts 30 + years ago. It's been pretty interesting. Mostly good, though of course, not always. What's always good, anyway?

Someone I met said she was glad her daughter, who started in the arts, got out. I said that I have two of three kids in the arts, and they're doing very well/are happy.

Why the dichotomy? I think most folks hold the opinion that if you're not getting rich in the arts, it's not happening. Well, rich is relative. Some folks need more than others. And there are some wonderful opportunities in the arts as well.

It's not about becoming a rock star or the equivalent. There are plenty of great opportunities for people who do the difficult, behind-the-scenes work; writers, directors, camera people, composers for picture, sound designers, painters, sculptors, producers...you get the idea.

My daughter majored in theater, and was excellent. She then took a turn and became a lawyer like I did, passed the bar, but never practiced law a day of her life. She became a painter.

Her 10 year old daughter just landed a part in an Actor's Equity production of Sound of Music. Maybe there's a genetic component?

Her best friend is one of TV's best-known writers now.

My brother is a successful painter. My son was signed to a record label, has a publishing deal, co-owns an award winning production company, has 3 gold records, is co-executive producer of a New York Times 'Best Podcast of 2021' series with Dave Chappelle, and has so many other projects in the works that they had to hire people.

I supported them when they wanted to go into the arts in every way I could. Because yes, kids in the arts need that extra encouragement! Kids driven to the arts need someone to say, "Why not you?"

I don't believe in discouraging people from giving life their best shot. If they later decide it's not worth it, great! Do something else. Give it your best, and you'll be fine, one way or the other. The world is a world of opportunity, despite the 'common knowledge'.

Just my two cents: If your kids want to go into the arts, don't discourage them. Give them your blessings and support, and see what happens.

I realize this sounds awfully 'rah-rah', but it's also true, in my experience. Fear, and listening to the people who say, 'that's impossible' are the great mind-f$#ckers.

I know this sounds a bit too...'land of opportunity' for some. But it really is.
 
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As many here know, I started life in the arts, then went to law school, practiced law, and got back into the arts 30 + years ago. It's been pretty interesting. Mostly good, though of course, not always. What's always good, anyway?

Someone I met said she was glad her daughter, who started in the arts, got out. I said that I have two of three kids in the arts, and they're doing very well/are happy.

Why the dichotomy? I think most folks hold the opinion that if you're not getting rich in the arts, it's not happening. Well, rich is relative. Some folks need more than others. And there are some wonderful opportunities in the arts as well.

It's not about becoming a rock star or the equivalent. There are plenty of great opportunities for people who do the difficult, behind-the-scenes work; writers, directors, camera people, composers for picture, sound designers, painters, sculptors, producers...you get the idea.

My daughter majored in theater, and was excellent. She then took a turn and became a lawyer like I did, passed the bar, but never practiced law a day of her life. She became a painter.

Her 10 year old daughter just landed a part in an Actor's Equity production of Sound of Music. Maybe there's a genetic component?

Her best friend is one of TV's best-known writers now.

My brother is a successful painter. My son was signed to a record label, has a publishing deal, co-owns an award winning production company, has 3 gold records, is co-executive producer of a New York Times 'Best Podcast of 2021' series with Dave Chappelle, and has so many other projects in the works that they had to hire people.

I supported him when he wanted to go into the arts in every way I could. Because yes, kids in the arts need that extra encouragement! Kids driven to the arts need someone to say, "Why not you?"

I don't believe in discouraging people from giving life their best shot. If they later decide it's not worth it, great! Do something else. Give it your best, and you'll be fine, one way or the other. The world is a world of opportunity, despite the 'common knowledge'.

Just my two cents: If your kids want to go into the arts, don't discourage them. Give them your blessings and support, and see what happens.

I realize this sounds awfully 'rah-rah', but it's also true, in my experience. Fear, and listening to the people who say, 'that's impossible' are the great mind-f$#ckers.

I know this sounds a bit too...'land of opportunity' for some. But it really is.
Soooo well written and said…….!!
 
Thank you for sharing Les. You have a lot to be proud of. You’ve inadvertently described excellence and that is is the pinnacle of success.

I’ve come to appreciate people that have different talents and personalities than myself as I’ve grown older. The thing that inspires me most is the commitment and desire for excellence. That is what has drawn me to PRS. A high level of give a **** factor trumps all!
 
As many here know, I started life in the arts, then went to law school, practiced law, and got back into the arts 30 + years ago. It's been pretty interesting. Mostly good, though of course, not always. What's always good, anyway?

Someone I met said she was glad her daughter, who started in the arts, got out. I said that I have two of three kids in the arts, and they're doing very well/are happy.

Why the dichotomy? I think most folks hold the opinion that if you're not getting rich in the arts, it's not happening. Well, rich is relative. Some folks need more than others. And there are some wonderful opportunities in the arts as well.

It's not about becoming a rock star or the equivalent. There are plenty of great opportunities for people who do the difficult, behind-the-scenes work; writers, directors, camera people, composers for picture, sound designers, painters, sculptors, producers...you get the idea.

My daughter majored in theater, and was excellent. She then took a turn and became a lawyer like I did, passed the bar, but never practiced law a day of her life. She became a painter.

Her 10 year old daughter just landed a part in an Actor's Equity production of Sound of Music. Maybe there's a genetic component?

Her best friend is one of TV's best-known writers now.

My brother is a successful painter. My son was signed to a record label, has a publishing deal, co-owns an award winning production company, has 3 gold records, is co-executive producer of a New York Times 'Best Podcast of 2021' series with Dave Chappelle, and has so many other projects in the works that they had to hire people.

I supported him when he wanted to go into the arts in every way I could. Because yes, kids in the arts need that extra encouragement! Kids driven to the arts need someone to say, "Why not you?"

I don't believe in discouraging people from giving life their best shot. If they later decide it's not worth it, great! Do something else. Give it your best, and you'll be fine, one way or the other. The world is a world of opportunity, despite the 'common knowledge'.

Just my two cents: If your kids want to go into the arts, don't discourage them. Give them your blessings and support, and see what happens.

I realize this sounds awfully 'rah-rah', but it's also true, in my experience. Fear, and listening to the people who say, 'that's impossible' are the great mind-f$#ckers.

I know this sounds a bit too...'land of opportunity' for some. But it really is.
From a parent’s perspective, this is the post of the year. Maybe decade.
 
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