The Book Thread

garrett

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Hey, read any good books lately?

I always read while riding the train to and from work. I actually feel weird without a book in my hand. I'm feeling a bit uninspired for ideas lately, though. I've mainly been reading Stephen King stuff for the last several months, but I'm over his style for now.

Anybody read the Jack Reacher books? My interest is piqued after all the press about the film. It's a mighty long series, would keep me occupied a while!

I like a pretty wide range of stuff, from King to the Dexter novels, historical non-fiction, biography, music, classics.

So... whatcha readin'?
 
I'm reading the Keith Richards autobiography "Life" right now. It's one of the best books I've ever read regardless of genre, and maybe the best music-related book. I wasn't a big fan of him or The Stones, so I put off reading this one for a long time. Big mistake on my part.

Goldtop Lloyd
 
I like to read detective murder mysteries. Elly Griffiths, Dana Stabenow, Spencer Quinn, Henning Mankell, Alexander McCall Smith come to mind as series novels. If I like the characters I want to read more. I recently finished The Complaints by Ian Rankin and have another to read in the works. For non fiction I found Brian Greene can make trying to understand the universe easier. I got a Kindle when they first came on the scene but have since moved o the iPad.
 
I'm reading the Keith Richards autobiography "Life" right now. It's one of the best books I've ever read regardless of genre, and maybe the best music-related book. I wasn't a big fan of him or The Stones, so I put off reading this one for a long time. Big mistake on my part.

Goldtop Lloyd

Thank you for that. I have it in my pile but haven't been able to start it yet.
 
The latest Stephen King novel about time travel and attempting to stop the Kennedy assassination is fantastic. Also, any Robert Crais, Harlin Cobin, or Nelson DeMille is a worthy read. What sets these guys apart? Smart a$$, but believable dialogue.
 
I read a ton, although once my kids were born, my reading time declined (I read over 100 books in a year at least once). Magazines as well as books, although I've fallen way behind with some mags.

As for books, among the more recent were Penn Jillette's latest, "Every Day Is An Atheist Holiday!" Some great stories in there - the love in his family really comes through in his stories. His stories about his parents are especially touching. In his previous book, he told a story about him and his friends discussing whether they could have turned in a sibling as happened with the Unabomber and his brother. Penn's sister was there and said, "Why is this even a discussion? How could you have anything to discuss?" Someone asked her if she would turn Penn in if he'd done something like that. She said no, and they threw other questions at her but she never wavered. Penn said it was inconceivable to her to do something like that to her brother. He also told a story about telling his mother he loved her. She said, "Of course you do", meaning not that she was diminishing the sentiment, but that she couldn't imagine that he wouldn't love her the way she loved him. Oh, and the story in the new book about James Randi's Houdini bust is classic.

Let's see, beyond that, I just read a Randy Rhoads book that was put out by Velocity. It's a big honking book with tons of pictures and a lot of stories from folks from the Quiet Riot era as well as the Ozzy years, and Randy's girlfriend. It was kind of overpriced, to be honest, but I'm a big Rhoads fan, so it was worth it to me.

Pete Townshend's book, "Who I Am" is also a good read, although there are some times when you wish he'd be a bit more forthcoming.

Peter Criss's "From Makeup To Breakup" was really interesting. He got into some of the stories that Ace Frehley didn't in his book. He does come across as a bit petulant at times, but he calls himself on quite a few things.

The Stephen King book that Steve mentioned ("11/22/63") is really good - a different way to approach the story of the Kennedy assassination. Trivia - IIRC, King also wrote a script for the Twilight Zone reboot in the 80s that centered on the Kennedy assassination. I've read WAY too many books about that - I actually gave up reading about it for a number of years because I burned out on it.

Another King book, "Billy Blockade" - a collection of two short stories. The title story is a cool baseball story with a King twist.

"Abbey Road To Ziggy Stardust" - Ken Scott's career from the Beatles to Bowie to Elton to Missing Persons and beyond. Great behind the scenes stuff, especially about how the studios worked.

"Year Zero" by Rob Reid - an alien culture discovers Earth's music, and after years realizes how much they owe in royalties and determines the only honorable thing to do is destroy Earth because they can't pay.

Next up, "Making Rumours", about the Fleetwood Mac album. Then I can try to catch up on Vince Flynn, Christopher Moore (great stuff there), King and a whole lot more.
 
Just finished My Bass And Other Animals by session bassist Guy Pratt. Good read!

Downloaded The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire & The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets Nest (Millenium Series) by Stieg Larsson. Enjoyed the original and 'Hollywood' versions of the 'Dragon Tattoo' so I thought i'd give the books a whirl.

Got a dozen or so James Patterson books to be read too, but I never get round to it.
 
JackpotPaperbackCover2.jpg
 
The Slash book is really good. I'm a bit biased cause I'm pretty into his stuff. I don't read many books all the way through. This one was well done and kept my interest.
 
I read a few of the Jack Reacher books when I visited my Aunty in New Zealand, only because I ran out of her Matthew Reilly books. Those things are like full on action movies, they never let up!
 
As for books, among the more recent were Penn Jillette's latest, "Every Day Is An Atheist Holiday!" Some great stories in there - the love in his family really comes through in his stories. His stories about his parents are especially touching. In his previous book, he told a story about him and his friends discussing whether they could have turned in a sibling as happened with the Unabomber and his brother. Penn's sister was there and said, "Why is this even a discussion? How could you have anything to discuss?" Someone asked her if she would turn Penn in if he'd done something like that. She said no, and they threw other questions at her but she never wavered. Penn said it was inconceivable to her to do something like that to her brother. He also told a story about telling his mother he loved her. She said, "Of course you do", meaning not that she was diminishing the sentiment, but that she couldn't imagine that he wouldn't love her the way she loved him. Oh, and the story in the new book about James Randi's Houdini bust is classic.

Let's see, beyond that, I just read a Randy Rhoads book that was put out by Velocity. It's a big honking book with tons of pictures and a lot of stories from folks from the Quiet Riot era as well as the Ozzy years, and Randy's girlfriend. It was kind of overpriced, to be honest, but I'm a big Rhoads fan, so it was worth it to me.

Pete Townshend's book, "Who I Am" is also a good read, although there are some times when you wish he'd be a bit more forthcoming.

Peter Criss's "From Makeup To Breakup" was really interesting. He got into some of the stories that Ace Frehley didn't in his book. He does come across as a bit petulant at times, but he calls himself on quite a few things.

Next up, "Making Rumours", about the Fleetwood Mac album. Then I can try to catch up on Vince Flynn, Christopher Moore (great stuff there), King and a whole lot more.

You and I have some similar interests. I think Pete's book is next for me. I liked the Peter Criss, but I thought Ace's was awful. A disappointment because I'm a fan of his music and playing.

I'm a BIG fan of The Who, so I'm always looking for books on them. Some are hard to find nowadays, unfortunately. Same for Fleetwood.

Lloyd
 
Hey, read any good books lately?

I always read while riding the train to and from work. I actually feel weird without a book in my hand. I'm feeling a bit uninspired for ideas lately, though. I've mainly been reading Stephen King stuff for the last several months, but I'm over his style for now.

Anybody read the Jack Reacher books? My interest is piqued after all the press about the film. It's a mighty long series, would keep me occupied a while!

I like a pretty wide range of stuff, from King to the Dexter novels, historical non-fiction, biography, music, classics.

So... whatcha readin'?

I've read all the Jack Reacher books. Easy fun reading. In the books Jack is 6'5" tall whereas Cruise is closer to 5'6" tall.. Try the Vincent Flynn Mitch Rab (sp?) series. Mitch is a CIA assassin who kills bad guys to protect his country.
 
Philip Jose Farmer
Harlan Ellison
Kurt Vonnegut
Steven King (Until he wrote "Bag of Bones"...can't really get through anything he's done since the late '80's or so.
Philip K. Dick (all time favorite author, and in my opinion, a metaphysical genius who actually personally experienced a crack in the space-time continuum and spent the rest of his 9 years of life trying to understand it (2-3-74).


One day, I hope to be able to finally read and understand WTF James Joyce was trying to convey in "Finnegans Wake".
 
Glad to see we have a lot of readers around here.

I also enjoyed the Keith Richards auto-bio. I'm not particularly a fan of his or the Stones, but it was a fascinating read for the most part.

I have read one Harlan Coben book, from the Myron Bolitar series. My wife does book swaps with friends a lot, so she's read a bunch of his stuff and passed it on before I got the chance to read others. It was an entertaining, easy read.

The Millennium Series books were great. Obviously the book was better than the Dragon Tattoo movie (I've seen both versions as well). The extra insight in the book really helps the story. I could see how people would have trouble following the Hollywood movie version. I think the second and third books will translate to the silver screen better.

I'm sure I'll get back into Stephen King at some point. Over the last year or two, I've read the Dark Tower Series, 'Salems Lot, The Stand, The Dark Half and Misery. I'm just a bit burnt out on his stuff.
 
IMO, since the late '80's.....if you've read one Steve King...you've read them all. I think he's run out of basic ideas, and keeps churning out the same concepts and dialogue ad nauseum.

I really enjoyed "Lobotomy" which was Dee Dee Ramones' Autobiography, written a year or two before he OD'ed right after his H.O.F. induction ceremony. Beware the "accidental hot shot".

I also enjoyed his ex-wife Vera's take on the story, "Poison Heart" written a few years after he accidentally offed himself. What's nice is that Vera seems to have a better relationship with his spirit now, through mediums, than she ever had when he was alive. :flute:

Apparently Death cures both Bi-polar disorder AND drug dependency and Abuse. Something to look forward to, I guess.:vroam:
 
I took my little girl to the library today and grabbed a couple of Vonnegut novels while I was there: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. They both looked intriguing. Should make for some good reading when i go on vacation at the end of the week.

I agree on the Stephen King comment. I think he has a tendency to over describe things. I didn't notice it in the Dark Tower books.
 
I took my little girl to the library today and grabbed a couple of Vonnegut novels while I was there: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. They both looked intriguing. Should make for some good reading when i go on vacation at the end of the week.

I love Vonnegut! I moved into a place with a fellow who had the most amazing library back when I was in my twenties, I think I read every one of Vonnegut's novels that year! Check out "Sirens of Titan" and "Mother Night" if you enjoy his style.


I can't let a discussion about books go by without recommending Christopher Moore and Douglas Coupland. "Lamb" by Moore and Jpod by Coupland are two of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.
 
I took my little girl to the library today and grabbed a couple of Vonnegut novels while I was there: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. They both looked intriguing. Should make for some good reading when i go on vacation at the end of the week.

I agree on the Stephen King comment. I think he has a tendency to over describe things. I didn't notice it in the Dark Tower books.



I love Vonnegut! I moved into a place with a fellow who had the most amazing library back when I was in my twenties, I think I read every one of Vonnegut's novels that year! Check out "Sirens of Titan" and "Mother Night" if you enjoy his style.


I can't let a discussion about books go by without recommending Christopher Moore and Douglas Coupland. "Lamb" by Moore and Jpod by Coupland are two of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.


My Ebay handle is "rarebooksnguitars". I had every book Vonnegut ever wrote, from "Player Piano" to "A Man Without A Country" signed! And I had all of his various signature incarnations, from his earliest on Player Piano to the more stylized circa "Slaughterhouse-5" and later. As well as his signature with his famous caricature that showed his face in profile.

My biggest mistake was selling the entire collection as a group about 2 weeks after he died a few years ago. That's the price of GAS. One Decent Private Stock = about 20 signed 1st editions. And it's very weird how your perspective changes, relative to your hobby. A signed, 1st edition "Slaughterhouse-5" for $1,500? Outrageous!!! Same price for a PRS? A freakin' steal.

BTW, and FWIW...."Slaughterhouse 5" comes as close to THE GREAT AMERICAN NOVEL as I've considered anything written by anybody. You can't appreciate the 3-Dimensional world and Time, until you understand it from a Tralfamadorian perspective.
 
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