Dark Side Of The Moon/Total Eclipse Of The Sun

alantig

Zombie Four, DFZ
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
15,051
Two weeks from a total solar eclipse that will see a long path of totality across North America. I believe this will cover quite a few of our members, with a lot more within a reasonable drive from totality. Where I sit will experience 97% totality, but as I've read, it's not as close as it sounds - full totality will turn day into night, but 97% won't by a fair bit.

We made reservations months ago, and we're driving to a site that will have about four minutes of totality. Got my eclipse glasses at the ready. Unfortunately, some of our plans were scuttled, maybe to our benefit. We had planned to drive Sunday afternoon, but a couple weeks ago it clicked with me that I have tix to a concert Sunday night. It's a farewell tour, too, so it's not something I can just catch next time (same as the eclipse!), so now we'll be leaving late Sunday night, which should eliminate any traffic. I'm hearing reports that are advising people to pack food and water almost like it's a natural disaster because of anticipated traffic and visitors.

FWIW, the next total solar eclipse that will come this close to me is in 2199, by which time I expect to be dead. Or at least not driving.

Anyone else doing anything?
 
Interesting how during the eclipse you don't see the moon at all. Just a dark shadow over the sun. It seems unlikely you wouldn't see any of the moons surface.
Go to a pitch black room, turn on a flashlight (a flashlight not so bright that you get refraction, light bouncing off the walls) and place a ball in front of the flashlight. The side of the ball facing the light will be brightly lit but you won't be able to see nothing about the ball surface on the other side.
 
I don't know. It just seems like it was a real object you would see parts of it as it eclipsed the sun. I just see a dark shadow.

If I put a bright spotlight directly in your eyes, you may not be able to identify a basketball as I move it towards and in front of the spotlight, because of the intensity of the light. The basketball may only appear as a shadow. but I can still take that basketball and bounce it, or pull it over far enough to the side that you see the orange and recognize what it is. But with intense light behind it and it in proximity, it may only appear as a dark spot that's blocking the light from your field of vision.
 
Go to a pitch black room, turn on a flashlight (a flashlight not so bright that you get refraction, light bouncing off the walls) and place a ball in front of the flashlight. The side of the ball facing the light will be brightly lit but you won't be able to see nothing about the ball surface on the other side.
Maybe directly in front of it but not to the side. Not buying it.
 
Who knows? It appears the moon isn't a solid planet in space however. It could be a light in the sky like the sun. The objects in space are timekeepers for days months and years. I'm glad they are there, but no one is ever going to go to them.
 
Much more excited about the possibility of seeing the northern lights in south Michigan tonight. Probably a low chance, but enough to get me out looking.
I was lucky enough to be able to experience the Northern Lights in Iceland on a couple of occasions! Incredible experience especially when they dance (movement) and you can sometimes here what to me sounded like a pulsing sound!! Hope you are able to get a show!!! Here is a photo I took in Iceland (the photos are real, but I took three of my northern lights photos and combined them along with a pic of Gjain Iceland for a more dramatic effect) ;~))
 
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