computer recording for guitar

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by mark cassidy, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. mark cassidy

    mark cassidy New Member

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    So, I am thinking about this whole recording thing and I'm wondering about how to do it on a laptop. I have used very basic recording devices such as a Tascam 6 track but I have never attempted anything on a computer, along with all these modelling doohickies they have nowadays. Is there a book that lays it out in a simple way for a simple guy like me? At the moment all I have, apart from the guitars themselves, is a Fender Blues Junior combo amp. Many thanks in advance!
     
  2. Huggy B

    Huggy B Mmmm... nitrates.

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    There is a multitude of tutorials on Youtube on each of the many DAW recording software programs on the market. That will be the best place to start, but I would suggest you get familiar with GarageBand first. It's probably the easiest and most user friendly DAW out there.

    Good luck on your journey.
     
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  3. Lister

    Lister Playing guitar badly since the 70's...

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    Welcome to the rabbit hole!
    There's more than a few YouTube vids to help get you started.
    This vid

    is the one I used to help get me going and there's a whole series where he walks you through the process. I also bought a focusrite 2i2 and used the free version of protools that came with the focusrite.
    Now with all that said, I still use my old tascam dp-008 for some things, simply because I'm familiar with it and it's simple for a luddite like me to use. In fact, everything on my soundcloud at the moment was done on the tascam and uploaded. I do have a few songs on my DAW, but they're not quite finished to a point I'm ready to upload just yet.

    Good luck!
     
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  4. jvin248

    jvin248 New Member

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    .

    Start by downloading Audacity (https://www.audacityteam.org/), search around for the plug-ins to add 300+ effects, but even the basics are very useful. Multi-track recording, editing, effects processing, makes this a very useful product.

    Then get UbuntuStudio. Audacity is in there, plus a lot more, pedal effects, amp sims, office productivity suite, artwork programs.
    If you have an old pc kicking around the house/garage that was 'too slow' or 'too many viruses' then install UbuntuStudio on it and have a dedicated music workstation.
     
  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    In their basic operations, DAWs operate as easily as that old Tascam 6 track. These days they come loaded with plugins for amp models, synth models, drum models, and a cornucopia of effects. Add a microphone or two, and suddenly you have a very capable portable recording rig.

    To give you an idea of how powerful today’s simple setups can be, my son produced two of the songs for the latest 30 Seconds to Mars record, featuring Halsey, with a 2015 MacBook Pro laptop, the least expensive Universal Audio interface, and a pair of headphones. The latest-greatest gear is not required in order to do this work. The album was released on Interscope, and did very well, going to #1 in both Billboard’s Alternative and Rock charts.

    So yeah, if a major label production can happen on a laptop, and gear you can fit into a backpack or briefcase, there’s no reason you can’t do your own productions on one!

    You’ll need an interface to record microphones, guitar, etc, and to get sound out to your speakers or headphones. Some folks still call this a “sound card,” although most people use external boxes that get plugged into the computer instead and still call it a sound card. Others will refer to it as A/D and D/A converters. Simple, right?

    If you’re just starting out, be patient with yourself; it takes a little bit of time to become familiar with a DAW. While they all do certain things, each one has kind of a ‘personality’ and a workflow that appeals to different people. For example, I use both Logic Pro and Digital Performer in my work, and the odd thing is that they each operate a bit differently, but do pretty much the same thing!

    What you might want to do is go online and check out the trial versions of these DAWs, and see what appeals to you. Many can be downloaded as demo versions. When you find one you like, buy that one regardless of anyone else’s “expert” opinion, and then consider getting a “how to” book dedicated to that particular DAW. There are any number of them geared to first-time users.

    You’d be surprised at how they differ in appearance and how they organize tracks, and the number of GUIs that are out there to pretty much do the same thing. However, they’ll all get you there; the look, workflow, and feel you like is what you’re after. They all sound just fine, are fully pro, and all of them can bounce mixes to the computer, or an external recorder, etc.

    Have fun with it! It’s not supposed to be daunting, it’s actually a lot of fun to learn this stuff.
     
    #5 LSchefman, Jun 15, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  6. matonanjin

    matonanjin New Member

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    Home Recording for Beginners
     
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  7. mark cassidy

    mark cassidy New Member

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    Sorry guys - was off piste for a day or two there. Back in the saddle now. And many thanks for the replies and input. Much appreciated. I'm looking to spend a fortune so the suggestions I'm seeing here will be real helpful. What I AM looking for is to have some fun. Many thanks!!!
     
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  8. vchizzle

    vchizzle Birdman.

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    I’ll add to the questioning more on the computer end. What is required? PC or Mac? I want to get a laptop- used and cheap. PC’s turn me off mainly because my mom has had 3 laptops in the past 5 years. All with great ratings and not inexpensive. I’d say good, that aren’t outrageous prices but solid specs i7, 1TB, 8-16 ram. But she’s had a multitude of issues between hardware, software, etc.
    That makes me want a MacBook Pro. I don’t need to make an full production album. I would like to do some multi track recording and be able to process 4K video without the thing bogging down. Nothing overly complicated, just a solid quality recording and decent video with some scene cuts. Think nice YouTube demo type thing. What do I need for ram, storage? i5, i7? I hear SSD is the way to go? What’s really important?
     
  9. Song

    Song In Nomine Dilectio

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    "What’s really important?" Imo the quality of the hardware (ram, cpu, ssd, etc) are inhibited by the two most popular viruses posing as OSs (macos and windows). Your Moms computers were/are just fine. It's windows causing all the problems. For years I custom ordered alienware PCs for my Mom and I. We ran windows, installed antiware, and dealt with all the drivers and issues. A couple years ago I discovered linux. I installed linux mint on my Moms stuff and she can do her things without calling me. Now she has zero problems. Her printer works (no drivers). My UAC-2 audio converter works (no driver). With window or macos drivers must be installed and it still doesn't work. My iMac and macbook pro never worked to potential until I installed mint. Now they are speed demons. My macbook boots up in 16 seconds and will restart in 21 seconds. No console/terminal coding is necessary nowadays. Graphical user interfaces that are cleaner, faster, and far better than macos/windows has ever made imo. My family loves mint but I've graduated to MX because my head is bigger ~~~ https://distrowatch.com/

    But if I were not interested in the control and power of linux and had to have a mac or pc for recording, and had some fat coin, I'd get an Imac or macboox pro with i7, 8+ ram, and ssd (then I would immediately install MX and never boot into macos lol.) For beginner and experienced recorders I recommend Audacity. But that's my preference since I record simple songs and live. Lots of daws of various complexity are available, garageband is still free on macs i guess. I'm a fingerstylist and this is the simple simon way I play and record https://soundcloud.com/johnnyjacksonbrooks/emerald-x7-3-28-19
    Good luck in your search for the right combination of hardware/software.
     
  10. JJJ

    JJJ asleep

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    I've just ordered a focusrite USB interface that came with protools and ableton. Some amp sims and stuff on there. It cost next to nothing, and there are heaps of similar products around. I'd give something like that a go and see if you like it.

    The Ableton recording software I have used for many years with line 6 interfaces and it's always super easy to navigate
     

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