About retire.

Lola

❤️guitar
Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Messages
2,122
I have decided come June 30th that will be my last day forever with this outrageously horrible company that I have given my life blood for. Why June 30 th you ask? My husband needs this very expensive medication that my benefits cover most of it. The gov’t kicks in the rest. He will be finished this particular medication June 30th. I thought I would stay another couple of years until I was 60 but I just can’t stomach this company anymore. I feel sick going into work because of the demands placed on me. I have been there too long and hence know basically how everything works. Get called in on my holidays, my days off and have missed important family events like birthdays etc. Just the toxicity my work place has developed over time has become just a way to much and so unnecessary. I am done never to return.

Music is my life and I seriously want to do something with it. I need to set up a structured future for myself. Do I go back to school to obtain a degree just for my own personal growth. Do I just just find a whole bunch of bands to play in a couple of times a week? Do I put together another band? Idk I would seriously just love to do this but reality does get in the way.

And I am going to get right back into fitness. I really want to hit the weights just light ones to maintain my bone density. Besides after a workout I feel incredible. It’s such a high. And I hike now with my youngest son. I don’t get to spend much time with him because of our schedules but hiking is such a great way for us to get out into nature and have some bonding time.

I will never waste my time in from the tv. I barely watch it anymore. I can sit for 5 minutes and then I am off to grab my guitar. My husband will watch for hours on end but atm he has no choice.

I just don’t want things to be “time fillers” before I visit my hero upstairs EVH.

Any tips tricks or tell us your story!
 
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Are you retiring or just leaving the company? If you're retiring, then congratulations on your upcoming retirement. In any case, it's wonderful that you have the option to leave a work culture that is not rewarding for you.

I'm going to assume that you are retiring. I hope I'm right.

I was able to retire a few years back, and I find that I'm pretty happy with the situation. I'm a hobby guitarist and have been playing for years, so in addition to still playing guitar, I'm learning to play piano. You might want to consider taking up a secondary instrument just to keep your mind fresh.

I've also found it's important to maintain a schedule. I don't say "oh, from 10am to 11am I'll work on this or that" but I do say "when I sit down to practice, I will practice towards certain goals, and I won't stop until I can see some progress towards those goals." I also don't practice too much. I did that when I first retired and ended up hurting my hands. Don't do that. :mad:

In the first month or so of retirement, you might also cut yourself some slack. If you feel like just watching YouTube videos about guitar, let yourself do that. If you're like most people in a toxic work environment, your work has probably left you exhausted and you most likely need time to recover. If you need a nap in the afternoon, take it.

One thing I haven't done is to find other people to play with. I regret that, but in my area it's difficult to find people my age who are interested in a casual jam situation. Or maybe I'm looking in the wrong places. But I have set up my former home office so that I can record myself using backing tracks, and I find that enjoyable. And it does keep me from getting stale.

And I'll say this (again): let yourself relax. It sounds like you are leaving an environment where you had to be going, going, going all the time. Allow yourself to not do that.

I hope that some of the things I've said here will help. And again, good luck and I hope you're happy in your new situation.
 
@douga yes definitely retiring from this job. I usually walk anywhere from 15k - 20k in steps a day. My workplace is huge. I will walk around my workplace just for some sanity. I am expected to “produce” at work in a timely and efficient manor. I feel like a slave. My problem is I never say NO at work. My fault. They just stack outrageous amounts of work for me to do. I just have to tell myself I can do this.

Maybe if I need to I can work 1 or 2 days a week.
My personality is that I need to be going full bore 24/7. Because of this job I don’t even know how to relax.

I am not really into travelling but we are planning a trip to Europe in a year or so after my husbands hopefully last surgery. He wants to visit his home in England. We are planning atm. My youngest son is coming with us. I want to check out some luthiers as well.

I really hate change and this will be a big change for me.
 
@Lola I used to be in the same state that you are in now. I hated my job and often had to leave my desk just for my sanity.

I have never been a person that has to be going 24/7, but I am used to a certain amount of activity. The thing that has helped most is getting out on the bicycle. I don't know if you're the type of person who would like this, but being able to get further than I would walking has been very helpful. Though I must admit, I don't do it enough -- I'm too obsessed with music a lot of the time. :)

But I also must say that I never run out of things to do. I find that in retirement, there's always something that got neglected while I was working, and I now have time to attend to that.

Congratulations again!
 
If you feel the need to retire and if you can afford to....(think "unexpected expenses") then go for it.

I was forced into retirement in March of 2020 when the pandemic hit. My plan was to work 1 more year then retire in March of 2021 but the pandemic changed that plan. Looked at the numbers ($$$) and said screw it, I'm done. Felt like 4 tons had been taken off my shoulders due to the stressful job I was in.

It's an adjustment, no doubt about it. But one thing I adjusted to very quickly was sleeping in! No problem with that. Mind you, I had to get up at 4 AM and I was now waking up on my own around 5:30 or 6 AM. Wonderful!

For the first few weeks I found myself a little bit antsy. "gee, I already vacuumed the house twice, now what!" But I was slowly adapting to my new way of life. Got an exercise routine going, a house cleaning routine established and I could practice more. Even starting dabbling in art which is very enjoyable. I was also able to see my mom a bit more. While working I was seeing her once a week to take her grocery shopping. Once retired I was her twice a week. (Dad passed in 2016).

Then two months later the unexpected happened. My mom had dementia but it wasn't too bad although one of my brothers took over her finances for her. She could cook and clean (slowly) but other than being a little confused she did okay.

In May of 2020 she went right downhill overnight. I saw her one day and she was okay. Went back the next day for something and she was a different person. Didn't know where she was, didn't recognize her apartment and had no idea how to operate a microwave or a washing machine. Started falling a lot too. So for all of May, June and part of July I was over there pretty much everyday taking care of her. I prepared a lot of meals for her, did her cleaning and laundry and kept her daily medications in check. Nothing made any sense to her. Started hearing some wild stories of people in her apartment. It was hard trying to explain reality to her. It was even harder hearing her "reality."

Sometime in July of 2020 I went over to her place and she had taken one fall to many. Had a huge bump on the back of her head. Took her to the hospital and she remained there for about a week. After that she went to the assisted living section of where she was staying for observation and between the staff, the doctors, myself and one of my brothers we decided the best thing for her and for her safety was to remain in assisted living. I called her just about everyday and went ot visit her once a week. It was very hard because only "window visits" were allowed due to the pandemic. Then I started the task of packing up her apartment to get everything into storage. Moms health and metal capabilities went up and down, back on forth from one extreame to the other until she passed in March of 2021.

So for almost a year into my retirement, (and for a good month afterwards) this is what I was dealing with. But things work out the way they do for a reason. I am convinced, totally convinced that the Lord said "I'm going to retire you now because very shortly your mom is really going to be needing you." No one can convince me otherwise. It was tiring and it drained me emotionally but I am so glad the timing worked out the way it did and that I could be there for her.

Didn't mean to go on for so long and I'm not looking for a pat on the back. Just saying that this is how life goes and you try to do the best you can with what you're handed.

Since then I pretty much take each day one at a time. No real, set routine per say and that's okay. I'm very content to live a very low key and modest life style. Wouldn't have it any other way. I'm now 70 years old and still play guitar at church. Been practicing a lot more while knowing I'll never set the world on fire and that's okay.

Lola, I wish you well.
 
Congratulations and enjoy it.

I retired a long time ago at a young age (55).
I retired from a long-term job that I liked but it was time.

That being said I have advice...
I always have advice, but I seldom offer it
because I don't know what I'm talking about
and only have 3 active brain cells.

Not in this case.

When you retire, DO NOT sit on the couch with a bag of potato chips,
a 2-liter bottle of Coke/Pepsi/Fanta/whatever and turn on your television.

That is a shortcut to a much more permanent form of retirement.

Stay active.
Do those things you never had time for.
Go for it. (whatever "it" is for you).

Have fun.
It's always about the fun.
 
@douga i do have a bike. I used to ride it all the time but between walking my 3 dogs 2-3 x’s a day takes up some time and doing everything else it cutting it close. Walking my dogs though is amazing. I put on my headphones and I am off. I come back ready to go and very refreshed. I have such a good time by myself. Listening to the music that I love and doing something wonderful for my pooches.

I used to play piano and be able to sight read musical notation. I really did love playing piano. There is definitely going to be a war between my guitars and a piano. I have a Yamaha Keyboard which will fit the bill nicely. I don’t even know where it is now.

I was thinking too that I want to enroll Blade into a training class or me train him agility. He may be small but he can be a torpedo given the opportunity. I want anothe dog as well. I want a Doberman. I just love that breed. Had 5 of them. I still am fit enough to handle them especially when they are trained to obey. We will introduce it to the pack as a puppy. That’s the only way this will work.

And then…..I had another epiphany. I can start planning my studio downstairs. My very own real studio. Then I will never have to travel to another studio again. This is very exciting. I just don’t know the process involved. I will surely find out though. I want a stage and lighting too.

I know I have more ideas. Woodworking. Yes! Something useful to make with my hands. I have a whole workshop at my disposal. I really do love working with power tools. Such a good feeling. I am very good at figuring things out.

I used to do metal smithing and sell my products at shows and such but that no longer interests me.

Our cottage is our nest egg. We will be able to live very nicely and not have to scrimp. My hubby also has a very nice stock portfolio as well that we have been living off of ever since. That was one of the best choices we ever made. Investments in blue chip stocks.

My husband retired when he was 45 to help look after his parents. Now is health is precarious atm maybe this is actually the time to say goodbye to the madness!

Wow this is turning out to be okay! I will have to adapt because I detest change.
 
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I just don’t want things to be “time fillers” before I visit my hero upstairs EVH.

Any tips tricks or tell us your story!
I loved your post and can easily relate to what you're talking about. Like a lot of people, I feel that who I am is directly related to what I do with my time on the planet. Whether that's a good or bad thing, I can't say, but it's who I am.

I'm gonna tell my work story because I've tried very hard not to have a life of 'time fillers':

After college and law school I started working for a good law firm. I went to court young and won a lot of cases. That was good for my ego, but I had the nagging feeling after a few years that working for someone else wasn't gonna make me happy. So I started my own firm.

During this time I studied music privately, simply to keep my chops up.

The firm went well, too, and its success was also good for my ego but, ultimately, not fulfilling. I felt I was playing a role that wasn't who I was or wanted to be.

In my 30s, through a stroke of luck, I got into the ad music business. I did it on the side, and after a short time, it worked out well and I was able to leave my law practice and go full time into music. I'm still friends with my then-partners and associates; they understood and wished me well.

Over the last 32 years, I think and hope I've gotten better at my work. I love it. People have asked why I don't retire. My answer is, "Why would I? I love what I do. I can't wait to get up and do it again the next day."

Music has taken me on some great adventures, and I've loved almost every minute of my career. I don't feel I'm merely marking time until I kick off.

I do feel that going into music, it's a good idea to have a music education, whether that's private study or a university curriculum. When my son decided he wanted to be a musician, I encouraged him to get a degree in music. He did, and it's propelled his career; he's been touring with bands he admired as a kid, he's got a production company with several awards and gold records under his belt, and I mentioned his most recent concert adventure in another thread here just the other day.

Here's the thing: If you have the temperament of an artist, you have to be an artist, there's no two ways around it. You feel like a round peg in a square hole otherwise.

On the other hand, the arts are VERY difficult to succeed in, so preparation is key and that's why I like the idea of an education -- and it's NEVER too late to get one. There will be sacrifices, ups and downs. My mother used to call those "character builders."

From time to time I'm asked to guest lecture in both music composition and production at the university level, and at law schools to future entertainment lawyers, because of my familiarity with the music business. That feels almost as good as doing the music work, though it's not a career path for me. I'd have to show up and work for someone else! Can't do it.

Anyway, I don't remember who said, "If you love what you do for a living, it isn't work." There's a lot of truth in that. I'm that guy, and I feel very lucky to be that guy.

I guess this is more of a story than advice. I'm sharing it because you might be able to get some ideas from my endless blah-blah-blah.

[Edit]

I should mention that, adjusted for inflation, law was an easier way to make a living, and more secure. However, one thing I learned was that doing things is a greater source of happiness than owning things. In fact, owning things doesn't do much for me in the long run unless they help me do things..
 
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@László i am a doing person. I can’t be anything but. To sit on the couch eating a bag of whatever day after day! No thank you! Never for me. I up and conquering the day as soon as my eyes are open. I need to get up and get out the door. I need to be active. Coffee consumed before hand. The only time I am not in flight is when I sleep or read. I forgot how much I love to read. I have a library in my family room full of books that I have never had time to read like I have wanted to.
I see older ppl in the mall that are my age or a tad older that look like they are on death’s door. I would rather be dead. My health is extremely important to me and I will be able to focus on anything without the crazy stress I face at work daily. As I sit here my stomach is already in knots and churning. I have to take medication almost daily for my stomach issues caused by this sh*tty stressed out job that I am in.

Getting older doesn’t bother me at all. It just doesn’t define who I am. And never will.

Owning or possessing things is not me. They’re just things. I am just not impressed by anything anymore. $ nah, fast cars nah, you get the picture. I am so very fortunate to have what I have. As long as I have the basics like food, a roof over my head and my bills paid then I am good. I can’t say this about my guitars though. I couldn’t be without them. I would have some serious mental issues if I didn’t have my guitars. I am just being honest.

I do love helping ppl too. Maybe I can put in a day or two working at a food bank or a (homeless shelter).( this might be ify though).

Dance class comes to mind. I always wanted to learn ballroom dancing.

Actually when I think about it there is a lot for me to be productive and active with.

I will never let myself “wither” away. That’s just not me. Mentally at times I think I am 25 and invincible. It’s not reality but it keeps my guns just ablazing and my guitars a rocking!

The only thing that has disappointed me is my dream of performing in a public capacity besides busking. But I have to look at the sage experience I have gleaned from playing with multiple bands. I have learned a ton of things especially about others and how to play with them. That in itself is beyond priceless. Musicians for the most part are a really weird group of ppl.
 
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I retired 6 years ago at 62 , the good news is you are a talented musician so boredom won't be a big issue. My advice : do SOMETHING each day that you feel accomplished for , even if it seems menial. Keep you brain active ! This is crucial as you age, without the challenges of work some folks without mental stimulation or purpose go down suprisingly quick . For me working at the Cafe' has been a life saver , being involved in the music community in some way each week , passing down the lessons learned.
 
@douga i do have a bike. I used to ride it all the time but between walking my 3 dogs 2-3 x’s a day takes up some time and doing everything else it cutting it close. Walking my dogs though is amazing. I put on my headphones and I am off. I come back ready to go and very refreshed. I have such a good time by myself. Listening to the music that I love and doing something wonderful for my pooches.

I used to play piano and be able to sight read musical notation. I really did love playing piano. There is definitely going to be a war between my guitars and a piano. I have a Yamaha Keyboard which will fit the bill nicely. I don’t even know where it is now.

I was thinking too that I want to enroll Blade into a training class or me train him agility. He may be small but he can be a torpedo given the opportunity. I want anothe dog as well. I want a Doberman. I just love that breed. Had 5 of them. I still am fit enough to handle them especially when they are trained to obey. We will introduce it to the pack as a puppy. That’s the only way this will work.

And then…..I had another epiphany. I can start planning my studio downstairs. My very own real studio. Then I will never have to travel to another studio again. This is very exciting. I just don’t know the process involved. I will surely find out though. I want a stage and lighting too.

I know I have more ideas. Woodworking. Yes! Something useful to make with my hands. I have a whole workshop at my disposal. I really do love working with power tools. Such a good feeling. I am very good at figuring things out.

I used to do metal smithing and sell my products at shows and such but that no longer interests me.

Our cottage is our nest egg. We will be able to live very nicely and not have to scrimp. My hubby also has a very nice stock portfolio as well that we have been living off of ever since. That was one of the best choices we ever made. Investments in blue chip stocks.

My husband retired when he was 45 to help look after his parents. Now is health is precarious atm maybe this is actually the time to say goodbye to the madness!

Wow this is turning out to be okay! I will have to adapt because I detest change.

It sounds to me as if you are going to have a great retirement.

Walking dogs is quite a bit of exercise. I know someone who lost weight and kept it off, and the only time they ever exerted themselves was walking their dog.

I also like dobermans. If you get the right one, you'll end up with a wonderful loyal family dog.
 
It’s great when people have jobs they love, and look forward to going in every day. For the vast majority, that’s not reality, and that never bothered me. That’s why they had to pay me, because otherwise I’d do it for free. I loved the result of what I did for a living, and see the necessity of it, but it involved a lot of stress, difficulty, and physical danger. All that considered, it was a great career and I am very satisfied when I look back on it.

People who preceded me told me for many years that “you’ll know when it’s time.” I thought I knew what they meant, and thought I was ready to retire years and years before I did. But when the actual realization that “it was time” came on, I understood what they meant. It wasn’t a feeling of angst or desperation, just a realization that it was time. I retired at the top of my profession, leading a great organization that was prepared for the future, with plenty of gas left in the tank. I could have stayed, and was still performing at a high level. Felt a little “Michael Jordan” to roll out while still at a high level, and with your employer telling you they wish you’d reconsider. I figured that time would be the judge of whether or not I was a good leader, because if it fell apart when I left I’d know the succession planning wasn’t as it appeared. I’m glad to say that I’ve breathed the sigh of relief, as I approach 5 years gone mid-January 2024… all is well.

I‘m telling this story because, in some jobs, I’ve found that you don’t see the value of your labor for quite a while… maybe years to get the perspective. At the least, you’ve done the value of providing for yourself and your family for decades, and there is personal, familial, and societal benefit to that. You’ve contributed to the greater good.

On the busy-ness side of retirement, it doesn’t take much effort to stay quite booked up. I don’t know how I got anything done while I was working because I struggle to find time to get everything in! I think you’d have to really work at it to be bored as a retiree. It’s wonderful, though, to have first-call control of your schedule, and be busy on the things that matter to you.

So still mega-busy, don’t have the free money I used to, but am quite satisfied with life as a retiree. I think you’ll love it if you want to love it. If you don’t, people are always hiring a person willing to work. Win/win/win.
 
I’m in year 13 of retirement and retired young. I was a trial lawyer who handled murder cases almost exclusively for 15 years. Loved it, but it took a toll as it was 24/7/365 at least in terms of always thinking, rethinking, etc. I spent the last 5 years (at the time I did not know it would only be 5 years) slowing down by switching to high level while collar crime. Better for my health and well being (especially more regular hours) but I missed the adrenaline rush of trying murder cases. So not willing to return to what I loved at the expense of my well being and being unfulfilled with my boring gig I simply retired. My wife (also an attorney) and I set up a training/consulting business that we closed out in 2022. We were able to take as much or as little work as we wanted (fortunately we were in high demand) and therefore could regulate our time to fit our desire to enjoy retirement.

I don’t think this applies to you as you seem to be highly self-motivated, but be aware of inertia. If you stay stopped too long it’s difficult to get going again. I was more productive (outside of work) when I was working. Now my first thought is “there’s always tomorrow “ Tomorrow never seems to come when it involves doing undesirable chores.

Playing guitar is my hobby. Music was never a calling for me. But whereas I cherished every moment with my guitar when I was working because time was at a premium, I now find playing has lost a lot of luster because I have too much time. So have a plan to keep physically and mentally active everyday.

I don’t know what your financial situation is. But, keep in mind if you’re going to be stressing about finances you will have replaced workplace stress for financial stress. Don’t underestimate that level of misery. Even with our comfortable financial life and extensive travel, there are many days of just merely existing because there’s no deadline that needs to be met. That, in and of itself, can drain the spirit.
 
I liked my job when I retired, but I retired anyway.

It takes more than one thing to fill days in a meaningful way. I can’t do any one thing all day, every day. I took 6 months to just relax and do things I enjoyed, which included riding a bike 90+ hours in the first three weeks.

After that I started doing volunteer work. Partly to retain social interaction and partly to do something productive.

Bottom line: variety really is the spice of life.
 
I’m in year 13 of retirement and retired young. I was a trial lawyer who handled murder cases almost exclusively for 15 years. Loved it, but it took a toll as it was 24/7/365 at least in terms of always thinking, rethinking, etc. I spent the last 5 years (at the time I did not know it would only be 5 years) slowing down by switching to high level while collar crime. Better for my health and well being (especially more regular hours) but I missed the adrenaline rush of trying murder cases. So not willing to return to what I loved at the expense of my well being and being unfulfilled with my boring gig I simply retired. My wife (also an attorney) and I set up a training/consulting business that we closed out in 2022. We were able to take as much or as little work as we wanted (fortunately we were in high demand) and therefore could regulate our time to fit our desire to enjoy retirement.

I don’t think this applies to you as you seem to be highly self-motivated, but be aware of inertia. If you stay stopped too long it’s difficult to get going again. I was more productive (outside of work) when I was working. Now my first thought is “there’s always tomorrow “ Tomorrow never seems to come when it involves doing undesirable chores.

Playing guitar is my hobby. Music was never a calling for me. But whereas I cherished every moment with my guitar when I was working because time was at a premium, I now find playing has lost a lot of luster because I have too much time. So have a plan to keep physically and mentally active everyday.

I don’t know what your financial situation is. But, keep in mind if you’re going to be stressing about finances you will have replaced workplace stress for financial stress. Don’t underestimate that level of misery. Even with our comfortable financial life and extensive travel, there are many days of just merely existing because there’s no deadline that needs to be met. That, in and of itself, can drain the spirit.
@tiboy Like I said we are not rich by any means. My husbands stock portfolio has been keeping us fed for the 20 years or so. He retired at 45 to look after his parents and never worked a day after that. We have a beautiful lake house that will go up for sale in March so there is our nest egg. He has his CPP and his OAP. When I turn 60 I will get the same. Ya we’re not struggling financially. We are extremely modest ppl. My only expensive hobby is my guitars. We like nice things but we never break the bank. We have very little debt.

And your right I will always be motivated to get what I want out of life. It doesn’t matter what it is. If I want it I just pull out all the stops and go for it. Life is just too short to be so unhappy because of this sh*tty *ss job.
 
Lola, sounds like you’ve thought it through, going in with eyes wide open and have a plan. Funny, I spend money on bikes, cigars and guitars. With everything else I go cheap and live a very modest lifestyle. Plus the cigar addiction probably means my money will outlive me. lol.
 
The only thing I won’t tolerate is my quality of food. This really important to me and my family. I would rather spend my money on quality food not quantity.

I just want to distress asap. I need to feel better physically. I don’t want to get sick again.
 
I have decided come June 30th that will be my last day forever with this outrageously horrible company that I have given my life blood for. Why June 30 th you ask? My husband needs this very expensive medication that my benefits cover most of it. The gov’t kicks in the rest. He will be finished this particular medication June 30th. I thought I would stay another couple of years until I was 60 but I just can’t stomach this company anymore. I feel sick going into work because of the demands placed on me. I have been there too long and hence know basically how everything works. Get called in on my holidays, my days off and have missed important family events like birthdays etc. Just the toxicity my work place has developed over time has become just a way to much and so unnecessary. I am done never to return.

Music is my life and I seriously want to do something with it. I need to set up a structured future for myself. Do I go back to school to obtain a degree just for my own personal growth. Do I just just find a whole bunch of bands to play in a couple of times a week? Do I put together another band? Idk I would seriously just love to do this but reality does get in the way.

And I am going to get right back into fitness. I really want to hit the weights just light ones to maintain my bone density. Besides after a workout I feel incredible. It’s such a high. And I hike now with my youngest son. I don’t get to spend much time with him because of our schedules but hiking is such a great way for us to get out into nature and have some bonding time.

I will never waste my time in from the tv. I barely watch it anymore. I can sit for 5 minutes and then I am off to grab my guitar. My husband will watch for hours on end but atm he has no choice.

I just don’t want things to be “time fillers” before I visit my hero upstairs EVH.

Any tips tricks or tell us your story!
Follow your bliss, the rest will fall into place.
 
almost two years ago i dropped out of the rat race because i had lost my passion for corporate IT and i wanted to use my hands for music while they still worked.

i have not looked back.

i still get up at the same time every day, and after Domestic Dave chores are done i go to the studio. i'm having the time of my life!

it did take me a couple of months to find my groove so dont be surprised if you go through an adjustment period. good luck amd enjoy!
 
You know, looking forward my whole working life to retirement.... I've been questioning that a bit lately. Ever since I've been off work (about a year and a half now) due to injuries AND illness. It was fun for a couple of months, but then... what do you do? I had grandiose ideas of sitting here writing instrumental music and recording it... that never happened. Hell I don't even PLAY as much as I'd like. And if my foot wasn't injured I would have been out there hiking, biking, and walking, but truth be told... that would have only taken up a smallish portion of my time.

Sitting around the house isn't fun and isn't healthy. Even when I stop working permanently (retire) I still will nee SOMETHING TO DO. I'll play and exercise more, but that can't fill an entire day/every day. Maybe if I had a studio (even a dedicated room for music) like watlessness does, it would be a little different, IDK.
 
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