What is PRS like for you?

danktat

Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist
Joined
Nov 5, 2018
Messages
1,574
Location
PA, USA
OK. So, I posted on facebook a similar post to what I posted here about having to sell my custom 22, and just purchasing a new one---having a hard time containing myself while waiting on delivery.

It just so happens, the person who sold me my very first PRS guitar (he worked at a music store a few buildings down from a tattoo shop I was working at at the time) is on my friends list. He commented that he didn't understand it but he was happy for me. So I tried to explain it to him. This is what I said......

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That was as close as I was able to come as far as explaining it to someone who "likes something else". Just figured a few of you might be able to relate.
 
I completely get it. My problem is I love too many guitars. I do have a few that I have sold that I regretted later. That led to buying replacements for the ones I sold. The funny thing is that I don't really play the replacements. I wasn't playing the ones I sold in the first place and that is why I sold them. I think the problem was that I played a lot of gigs with some of them and selling them was like throwing the memories out or giving them to someone else. We will see how this goes because I am probably going to sell the replacements within the next year. I have a plan and it will result in less guitars but they will be the ones I play the most and like the most of the bunch. My first PRS, CU22 10 top, will probably be with me until I check out.
 
Hm, PRS reminds me on the perfect female silhuette (like a Porsche 911). In my initial guitar days the LPs of Slash drew a lot of attraction on me, though musical wise in those days I prefered bands with variations of Vs or Exs (Metallica, Megadeth, Pantera). But in the guitar magazines I consumed that day (US guitar especially) the PRS advertises with those violin shaped tops and mouthwatering grains were far beyond.
From first sight to first purchase it took approx. 19 years. I still like PRS's attention to detail, though I would personally reduce the number of models.
 
That is a really cool analogy! Guitars are an incredibly emotional thing and that response really nailed it. I don't have but 3 PRS guitars, and none of them are high end machines (well except in my personal limited music expense budget) but they have some undefined yet irresistible pull on my heart strings. I have considered selling/trading/upgrading my first SE Custom more than once, and still something holds me back like not wanting to give up that girl you first kissed. Then, when/if you do, there is that inevitable comparison...(sigh)
 
Odd that a person working in a music store wouldn’t “get it” about an affinity for a type of instrument, but I guess working in a music store doesn’t automatically mean you “get” music anyway.

When it’s right, it’s right, and you know it. I get that, totally.
He is one of those punk scene guys (still to this day....and he sold me that PRS in like 2000 or 2001). Give him a black, beat up finnish, Ib*nez or Epiph*ne LP and he is a happy man. The more beer stains and hot wing grime on it from playing bars, the better. He never understood the appeal of the pretty piece of wood covering the top of the guitar. "How can you beat the sh** our of it if you can't mess it up because it is too "cute". [we have had that conversation MANY a time]. And I get his lack of understanding, because I still can't understand the "relic" craze. But some people wouldn't have a guitar any other way. To each his own I suppose.
 
I've said it before, I don't like the "un-natural" relic thing either. Time honored wear and tear, sure. That's a badge of honor in my books, gives both the guitar and player some credence IMO. But as soon as you said the "punk" attitude thing, my personal alarm bell rings. Sorry, but I would never buy any instrument from anyone that exuded that kind of air and attitude. I'm not without my own personal prejudices after all.
I've mentioned before my store's guitar tech is a solid LP guy, and actually doesn't really care for PRS guitars himself. But he handles my axes with visible reverence and I really appreciate the care and respect he gives other people's instruments. I call that "professionalism". Something that I think is seriously lacking in today's world.
 
When it comes to women I'm attracted to:

All styles served here.
-- Roxy Music, 'Do the Strand'

But there is only one guitar brand for me...

Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark

That looks on tempests and is never shaken.
-- Wm. Shakespeare
 
Hm, PRS reminds me on the perfect female silhuette (like a Porsche 911). In my initial guitar days the LPs of Slash drew a lot of attraction on me, though musical wise in those days I prefered bands with variations of Vs or Exs (Metallica, Megadeth, Pantera). But in the guitar magazines I consumed that day (US guitar especially) the PRS advertises with those violin shaped tops and mouthwatering grains were far beyond.
From first sight to first purchase it took approx. 19 years. I still like PRS's attention to detail, though I would personally reduce the number of models.
The models get thinned out when they stop selling well.
 
He is one of those punk scene guys (still to this day....and he sold me that PRS in like 2000 or 2001). Give him a black, beat up finnish, Ib*nez or Epiph*ne LP and he is a happy man. The more beer stains and hot wing grime on it from playing bars, the better. He never understood the appeal of the pretty piece of wood covering the top of the guitar. "How can you beat the sh** our of it if you can't mess it up because it is too "cute". [we have had that conversation MANY a time]. And I get his lack of understanding, because I still can't understand the "relic" craze. But some people wouldn't have a guitar any other way. To each his own I suppose.
I have never understood the relic appeal. I am very careful with my guitars to keep them looking as new as I can for as long as I can. I play them and gig them but with a little are you can keep them looking great for many years. I have guitars that are 20 years old, maybe older, that look almost new.

I keep them in their cases when they are not being used or hanging on a hanger in my music room / office. When I take them to a gig, they are the last thing to go on the stage and the first to come off. When I was playing in smoky environments I would get them out and shut and latch the cases. At the end of the gig, I would give them a quick wipe down with polish and get them back in the cases. That kept them from stinking like smoke and making the cases smell like smoke. I still have a number of guitars that were gigged in a smoky environment and you can't tell it at all. There is no discoloration or smell to any of them.

It just takes a little effort, which I am happy to do. To me it is respecting and appreciating the things you own. You gave hours of your life to get them.
 
Odd that a person working in a music store wouldn’t “get it” about an affinity for a type of instrument, but I guess working in a music store doesn’t automatically mean you “get” music anyway.

This reminded me of an obscure Jerry Garcia quote (paraphrased): “Music stores are full of guys who play real good but can’t get along with other musicians” 😄

On topic, I definitely get it. It’s an intangible- except it’s also tangible. It can’t exactly be explained, but when it’s in your hands, you just know.
 
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