Steve Fischer’s name on the stamp?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Guitars' started by Isaac cruz, Aug 29, 2018.

  1. Isaac cruz

    Isaac cruz New Member

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    Ive seen some PRS acoustic’s with Steve Fischer’s name on the stamp. These are typically from 2010. Are these guitars what you’d call prototypes? Any differences to the guitars that came later?
     
  2. veinbuster

    veinbuster Coming of age

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    His name on the sticker doesn’t imply prototype. His name was on production guitars while he was there.
    The guitars evolved some after, as is the case with most PRS stuff but I couldn’t point to any specific post Fischer changes in guitars.
     
  3. Isaac cruz

    Isaac cruz New Member

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    Would a PRS acoustic with the Steve Fischer name on the stamp be the equivalent of a core model or a PS?
     
  4. veinbuster

    veinbuster Coming of age

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    Core unless it has a private stock designation as well.
     
  5. mad monk

    mad monk New Member

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    And most of the models with his name had the carbon fiber-non adjustable- truss rod; which is said to make no difference at all as to its playability.
    The 2 that I played were great. I have a post-Steve core model. Had nothing to do with his name.
     
  6. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    I had one with his name and the carbon rod, and also have a later PS with the carbon rod, something I wanted after owning the Core version.

    What I can positively say is that the carbon rod certainly makes a difference as to the guitar’s playability, because the neck never moves, bows, or needs adjustment. It’s consistent every single day. And by consistent, I mean consistently great.

    That consistency makes all the playability difference in the world.

    I also think not having a big hunk of metal inside the neck is good for the guitar’s tone. It’s subtle but the guitars sound really sweet.
     
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  7. Boogie

    Boogie SuperD

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    This is another innovation on PRS products that made a huge difference. Brilliant, again!
     
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  8. mad monk

    mad monk New Member

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    I probably should have clarified my statement. Because acoustic guitars can be very sensitive to their environment, a seasonal tweak of the truss rod is sometimes needed for those that can't maintain a consistently humid environment. Also, some players like more relief than others, hence the adjustable truss rod is their preference. I didn't intend an inference that the carbon fiber rod is inferior, just that some believe the seasonal humidity variations dictate a neck adjustment. That's where the "playability" part came in.
     
  9. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Yup. The good news is that with the carbon rod, being much stiffer than metal, it doesn’t ever need a neck adjustment due to seasonal changes. I’ve had mine since 2013. It plays exactly the same every day. I do use a D’Addario humidipak system to keep the top from sinking or swelling, so there’s that.

    I’m in Michigan; we get some pretty wild seasonal changes in temp and humidity.
     

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