Tuning problems PRS CE24

Discussion in 'Electric Instruments' started by blah, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. blah

    blah New Member

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    Hi guys!

    Can somebody help me with this problem? When I use a tremolo, tune goes for about 10 cents up... What could be wrong?

    On video I use tremolo pretty much, but it is the same if it used just for a little... Tuning is drop C# (c# g# c# f# a# d#) and strings are EB Heavey Bottom, 10.-52 and guitar is PRS CE24, 1996.

     
    #1 blah, Sep 14, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2015
  2. gush

    gush I'm not a new member!!!!

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    You will see tuning go off a few cents. Is it still in tune with itself? Looked like your low string went south more than the others.

    Pull trem up and see if low string goes sharp or returns to zero.
     
  3. blah

    blah New Member

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    I have blocked tremolo... So it goes just in down direction.
     
  4. rugerpc

    rugerpc A♥ hoards guitars ♥A
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    Is your nut cut for the gauge strings you are using?

    Nut binding is the first place to look.
     
  5. blah

    blah New Member

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    Yes... Nut is ok, beacuse tuning goes up just when tremolo is used. When you play, tuning stay in normal.
     
  6. toothace

    toothace We've got, you know, armadillos in our trousers.

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    If nut slot is not correct, playing without the tremolo shouldn't affect tuning. When using the tremolo arm, the string will bind in the too-small slot and go out of tune.
     
  7. sleary

    sleary New Member

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    Intonate it and I'd either say change the springs or lubricant the tremolo.
     
  8. sleary

    sleary New Member

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    I'd also look at even a bigger gauge of strings. Minimum of at least 11's .
     
  9. rugerpc

    rugerpc A♥ hoards guitars ♥A
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    If your nut slots are too tight, using the tremolo may cause tuning changes because the strings are binding in the nut when they are meant to slide freely.
     
  10. markintime

    markintime Wood Grain Devotee

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    Pretty obvious. The nut is the problem.
     
  11. archey

    archey New Member

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    When I tune a guitar with a vibrato, I tune down to the note, not up. It feels kind of weird doing it that way, but my strings always return to pitch better than if I tune up to the note.
     
  12. drdoom8793

    drdoom8793 THAT guy at Chick-fil-A

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    I've also heard this for locking vs non locking tuners. A lot of people recommend tuning up to the note with non locking but tuning down to the note with locking. I dunno! :dontknow:
     
  13. Mixstar

    Mixstar Just too tired . . .

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    To be perfectly truthful I've never rated locking tuners, I string 'em and they stay strung. The only guitar I own that detunes occasionally (apart from the normal atmospheric changes) is my LP Standard that has locking Grovers on it and I've thought about changing those a few times.
     
  14. greiswig

    greiswig New Member

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    This is makes zero sense to me; tuning up to the note makes it so that bends won't be prone to suddenly releasing the slack stored between the nut and the tuner. A properly-strung non-locking tuner will be no more or less prone to that than a locking one. Tune up to the pitch for the most stable system. But there will always be a little bit of friction at the nut that may make it so it doesn't return to perfect pitch after a bend or whammy effect. That's why some companies made locking nuts.
     
  15. blah

    blah New Member

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    So what should I do with nut? Change it for bone? Beacuse I fill it already with graffiti paste (or I don't know how does it called)...
     
  16. greiswig

    greiswig New Member

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    It would be really hard to give you specific advice without seeing your guitar in person, and to see how bad the issue is. It may be as simple as resetting your expectations: nothing short of a friction-free nut or a locking nut will prevent friction from creating a problem there to some degree. Using graphite paste should help. A bone nut will not help, as it has higher friction than the stock nut.

    You mention using heavy bottom strings, so perhaps they are binding in a too-narrow slot. If so, there is most of your problem. My advise would be to take it to a decent luthier who can diagnose it and fix it for you.
     
  17. G-Man

    G-Man New Member

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    If the nut is not the issue, is the tremolo returning to the correct position? Is the block causing it not come back to flat?
     
  18. markintime

    markintime Wood Grain Devotee

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    I think I would agree with greiswig here. When I ordered my SE CU24, I specifically asked Sweetwater to make it with 10-46 guage strings and make sure it intonated properly. Even then, however, I had to do a very tiny bit of work on the bottom E and A strings to get everything to come back to pitch after some tremolo use. And it does have the stock SE nut. And I do tune up with both locking and nonlocking tuners. No problems either way.
     
  19. Dusty Chalk

    Dusty Chalk alberngruppenführer

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    graphite paste?

    Alright, so here's a test -- press down on the strings behind the nut, see if it gives smoothly. (That's a normal test, no?)
     
  20. shinksma

    shinksma What? I get a title?

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    IIRC (and I wouldn't put any money on that), all PRSi came from the factory with regular .009s as stock up until about 5 or something years ago.

    So if you still have the stock nut, it was cut for smaller strings that you are using, especially the E and A strings - the stock E would have been .042, and you've got a .052 in there. That a 23% increase in size!

    If the strings go sharp after a dive on the trem, then that tells me you do indeed have a nut binding issue, which is perfectly normal. You just need to get the nut slots widened for your bigger strings. All the graphite in the world won't help if the slots are just too darned tight.

    No need to replace the nut - if you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself take it to a (good) guitar store and they will widen the slots for you for a fee (maybe $30? I dunno).

    Dusty Chalk's test is a good idea, and should help you see that those fat strings are binding in your nut.
     

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