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Random. No more or less

The older I get, the more I realize that what my parents weren't and didn't teach me has shaped me more than what they did. This is especially true now that I'm a father.

I don't speak to my parents anymore. Haven't in over a decade, since my mother's bad behavior surrounding my wedding. The drama and conflict that she thrives on no longer has a place in my life. I wish I'd realized how toxic things were earlier and dealt with them sooner.

Mostly it's that my parents aren't--in my mind--fully-formed people. There's a depth that isn't there. I grew up being told what not to do, which isn't how I'm choosing to do things with my son. The number of "real" conversations I had with my parents was almost zip. They're nice people at a surface level, but there's nothing below that. Lives not fully lived or developed. It's just not who they are.
Feeling the exact same way. Divorced all my siblings. Just had to get rid of some of the toxicity in my life.
 
I got me to thinking tonight how much I am really enjoying playing alone. It’s nice to be the captain of your own ship sometimes. And….no pressure to learn new songs. I am learning the new songs that I want to. It’s really alot of fun. I decided to look for some like minded ppl in my area in the New Year. That way I don’t have to travel on the train anymore and on Toronto’s notoriously dangerous subway.
 
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I got me to thinking tonight how much I am really enjoying playing alone. It’s nice to be the captain of your own ship sometimes. And….no pressure to learn new songs. I am learning the new songs that I want to. It’s really alot of fun. I decided to look for some like minded ppl in my area in the New Year. That way I don’t have to travel on the train anymore and on Toronto’s notoriously dangerous subway.

As much as I love my band and bandmates, I long for the days when I can do this. The band is fun, they are all great people, and it's a great therapy for me. But I really miss exploring the guitar on my own, learning things I have wanted to learn for years. But I can't do both- I just don't have the time.
 
I honestly think me taking a break from playing in bands was meant to be right now. I am so much better at just improvising now. It’s gratifying knowing my fretboard a little more intimately. Triads!
 
I honestly think me taking a break from playing in bands was meant to be right now. I am so much better at just improvising now. It’s gratifying knowing my fretboard a little more intimately. Triads!
What are these "triads" you speak of?
 
Serves you right for sulking when we had that conversation.
Simply speaking: 3 note chords, most fun if you separate the notes.
Seriously, I've heard several explanations and while I think the concept is basic, in my mind the couple things I heard conflicted somewhat so I didn't really get clear answer. Is it "any" 3 note chord? So, a 3 note barre chord on the low strings is a Triad, but also 3 note chords played on the top strings up high, also a Triad?

And after that, what do you mean by "separate the notes?" Arpeggio? or other
 
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A- huh?

B- Seriously, I've heard several explanations and while I think the concept is basic, in my mind the couple things I heard conflicted somewhat so I didn't really get clear answer. Is it "any" 3 note chord? So, a 3 note barre chord on the low strings is a Triad, but also 3 note chords played on the top strings up high, also a Triad?

And after that, what do you mean by "separate the notes?" Arpeggio? or other
Triad can be anywhere, but typically adjacent strings.
Yes, an arpeggio would separate the notes.
 
Triad can be anywhere, but typically adjacent strings.
Yes, an arpeggio would separate the notes.
So, as I expected, just a “term” for something I’ve been doing (and probably everyone who plays has been doing) since the first day I picked up a guitar.
 
So, as I expected, just a “term” for something I’ve been doing (and probably everyone who plays has been doing) since the first day I picked up a guitar.
"Triad" is just a term used to differentiate three-note chords from chords with more or less notes. Basically power chords and four-note chords on guitar.
 
The "term" has existed likely as long as there has been written music...LOL
Yes, I was just saying that even though I didn't confirm the definition prior to now, it's something I've always done and assume everyone has. 3 note, 4 note, 2 note, any form of partial chords are just that, right? What sparked my initial comment was another member saying they were spending a bunch of time on Triads, so I thought perhaps I was missing something, but it is what I thought it was. I'm sure I learned it (the term) in my youth, and when it came up, I thought I knew what it meant, but thought there might be more too it.
 
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Yes, I was just saying that even though I didn't confirm the definition prior to now, it's something I've always done and assume everyone has. 3 note, 4 note, 2 note, any form of partial chords are just that, right? What sparked my initial comment was another member saying they were spending a bunch of time on Triads, so I thought perhaps I was missing something, but it is what I thought it was. I'm sure I learned it in my youth, and when it came up, I thought I knew what it meant, but thought there might be more too it.
3 notes is a triad, the minimum number of notes to be called a chord. 2 notes is a dyad, also can be a power chord, typically the 1st and 5th. 4 notes is an augmented chord.
 
The "term" has existed likely as long as there has been written music...LOL
Yes, I was just saying that even though I didn't confirm the definition prior to now, it's something I've always done and assume everyone has. 3 note, 4 note, 2 note, any form of partial chords are just that, right? What sparked my initial comment was another member saying they were spending a bunch of time on Triads, so I thought perhaps I was missing something, but it is what I thought it was. I'm sure I learned it in my youth, and when it came up, I thought I knew what it meant, but thought there might be more too it.
Chord theory refresher? Maybe this will be helpful...maybe you already know it. If you already know it, my apologies. But maybe it will be helpful to someone else. I wish someone would have explained it to me this way.

Common Triads are constructed by playing every second note of the scale....twice starting at the root.

Looking at scale steps, the root is the first note of the scale/chord (the I). The second note of the chord is the third note of the scale. Every second note. If it is a major scale "the third" is two full steps above the root and is said to be a major third. If it is a minor scale, the third is 1.5 steps above the root and is said to be a minor third. It is the third of the chord that distinguishes minor chords from major chords.

The third note of the chord is the fifth note of the scale and finishes off the triad. The formula for a major triad is I, III, V. The formula for a minor triad is I, flat III and V. The Roman Numerals refer to the steps of the scale used in the chord.

If you continue the pattern and add the note two steps above the fifth, you have added the VII note of the scale and constructed a 7th chord. If the VII note is one step below the root it is a Minor 7 chord. If it is 1/2 step below the root it is a Major 7 chord.

You can also add other notes of the scale like the second step (II) of the scale (an octave higher) to make a 9th chord, the fourth step to construct an 11th chord, the 6th note of the scale to construct a 13th chord etc. As you may have noticed, whatever step you add, is numbered 7 higher than the actual interval because it is played at the octave. These are called extended chords.

A lot of players will use chords without the third to remove the minor/major distinction which allows more versatility. If you just play the I and V of the scale (no III), it is a power chord. But you can also leave out the third and add a 7th 9th etc. to make "extended triads" (three notes).

Edit: This process of taking every second note is called harmonizing the scale and is used to construct the chords of each key. If you start on the root (I) it is the first chord of the key, start on the second note of the scale and it forms the II chord (second chord of the key).
 
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3 notes is a triad, the minimum number of notes to be called a chord. 2 notes is a dyad, also can be a power chord, typically the 1st and 5th. 4 notes is an augmented chord.
Augmented is in reference to a quality rather than number of notes.

G7 is not an augmented chord but requires 4 notes. G B D F

Augmented, at the least, is a triad with a raised 5th. G augmented is G B D#.
 
Augmented is in reference to a quality rather than number of notes.

G7 is not an augmented chord but requires 4 notes. G B D F

Augmented, at the least, is a triad with a raised 5th. G augmented is G B D#.
Yes. :)

Augmented intervals are 1/2 step above a perfect or major interval (perfect 5th in your example). Might as well add that Diminished intervals are 1/2 step lower than perfect or minor intervals.
 
Yes. :)

Augmented intervals are 1/2 step above a perfect or major interval (perfect 5th in your example). Might as well add that Diminished intervals are 1/2 step lower than perfect or minor intervals.
And in jazz nomenclature, those would equate to sharp (interval) and flat (interval).

I have also seen minor (interval) interchanged with flat (interval) usually in context of the 9th degree but I don't particularly like the ambiguity that conveys.
 
And in jazz nomenclature, those would equate to sharp (interval) and flat (interval).

I have also seen minor (interval) interchanged with flat (interval) usually in context of the 9th degree but I don't particularly like the ambiguity that conveys.
I am not a Jazz player, but I always listen when players from Nashville speak. :)
 
I am not a Jazz player, but I always listen when players from Nashville speak. :)

Yeah you have to watch that sometimes though.

I've heard session guys and veterans in the industry miscommunicate information. Part of that I think comes from the whole Nashville numbers thing which is sort of like a functional analysis except everything is done relative to the major key.
 
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