SE Cu24 getting some "harmonic feedbacks" from B string 10th fret

Discussion in 'Electric Instruments' started by godoy.rafa, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. godoy.rafa

    godoy.rafa New Member

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    What the title says.
    Everytime I play B string 10th fret, no matter the tuning I'm in, the note sustains and turns to a harmonic feedback (can't describe better in english), like those Sustainers. An octave up.
    Is this something I can fix?
     
  2. veinbuster

    veinbuster Zombie Three, DFZ

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    The first thing I would do is look for some contact at the 22nd fret when you finger that note.
     
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  3. godoy.rafa

    godoy.rafa New Member

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    No contact... Only happens in this specific cenario... This happens since I bought the guitar new in 2012...
     
  4. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    Sounds like a dead spot. Put a weight on the headstock (like a small C-clamp over a cloth to protect the finish) and see if the sound changes to a different fret. If so it's a dead spot. Some say they can reduce them by playing with the string sizes and things but I've not been able to change them much. Just a part of using natural materials. I have a MIM strat with one too.
     
  5. godoy.rafa

    godoy.rafa New Member

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    Just did a quick research about dead spots, and this is it. I will try to add weight to the headstock.
    Is this common to PRS guitars?
     
  6. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    It's common to all guitars. Perhaps more to 24 fret ones so in that sense PRS may have more of them since they make more 24 fret guitars. PRSi also have more "wolf tones" which to my ears are a big plus. I love it when a sustained note turns into the harmonic and rings forever.

    My advice is to learn to play the riff with that note in it on another string to avoid the dead spot.
     
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  7. godoy.rafa

    godoy.rafa New Member

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    Never had this before in my cheaper Ibanez, LTDs and Jacksons. Bad luck then!
    Added weight to the headstock, dead spot shifted to 9th fret.
    Also found out that if I play the same note on G string for example, it sustains less than other notes. So it is frequency related.
     
  8. shimmilou

    shimmilou Established in 1963

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    Adjusting pup height have any affect?
     
  9. godoy.rafa

    godoy.rafa New Member

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    No. And it happens with both pickups.
    I have read this is called "wolf note".
     
  10. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    Yes, I see that sometimes too, but I think people miss-speak here. For me they are two different things. Maybe I'm the one who is wrong, but I hear two completely different things that I describe as "dead spots" and "wolf tones".

    A dead spot is a location on a fretboard where the note will not sustain as long as the rest of the notes around it. It just dies out and is gone. This phenomenon sucks! When using the note as a passing tone in a riff it usually rings long enough to not be a problem but if you end a riff on it and you need the sustain it's a bummer.

    A wolf tone is a location on the fretboard where the sustained note sheds off the tonic and is left with one or more harmonics and the sustain is just as long or longer than the rest of the notes around it. Under sufficient gain, the note will sustain forever. This phenomenon is very pleasing to my ears!

    Here's an example. At 3:20 to about 3:35. He sustains just one note but you will hear the original tone transition to an octave (or maybe two) higher and sustain. In my mind that is a wolf tone.
     
    #10 AP515, Feb 19, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
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  11. godoy.rafa

    godoy.rafa New Member

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    So mine is both! I have the harmonics, but with little sustain...
     
  12. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    I think that is just the tone of the dead spot. The tonic fades out first so you can hear the harmonic. The real problem is the note dies early.
     
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