I'm Going To Try Yet Another Modeling Plugin.

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Too Many Notes
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I have modeling plugins, and while I'm no fan of them, they sometimes good scratch pads for working out parts late in the evening.

When I upgraded my iZotope plugins last month, Guitar Rig 7 was part of the bundle - the bundle that included it was actually less expensive than buying the plugins I wanted individually. Since I own the license for it now, I downloaded it.

I'm a notorious tube amp curmudgeon who isn't into modelers. I had Guitar Rig 6 on my hard drive but removed it because I wasn't all that into it. I can't even remember all of the plugins I've tried that model guitar amps. A sh!t ton of them, in any case. Most leave the hard drive sooner or later - mostly, sooner.

Native Instruments (who now own iZotope) say they have an improved method of guitar amp modeling, using a kind component modeling technology similar to the one developers of some soft synths (for example XILS Lab) and recording hardware modeling plugins (such as Plugin Alliance) have used for years.

Instead of modeling just the input and output, the software models how each separate internal component behaves. Based on the software I have from those companies, this is a viable way to model.

Not as much like the hardware I've had of the same gear as I might prefer, but still viable.

Since GR7 cost me nothing because I'd have upgraded the software individually anyway, I'll try it over the next few days.

I haven't a clue whether or not this plugin sounds any better than Guitar Rig 6, which I previously had on my hard drive. NI says some of the amps are carryovers from the previous version, but others are new.

The plugin also loads in IRs. That's nothing new, of course; Waves and others already do that with their models, including the PRS models. But maybe this will be implemented in a different or improved way.

Maybe not.

I'll report back as soon as I get a handle on using this product in the real world; the software has an interface that must be learned, blah blah blah blah, etc.
 
I Will Be Surprised If You Like It.
So will I.

I just learned the interface, will test it out today.

I know I don't much care for the older simulations that are still part of the package. Maybe the new ones will be an improvement, though. There's always hope!

What I did like about the older versions of Guitar Rig was that the presets gave me some good ideas about effects chains to try. So that was kinda cool.

I guess we'll see later today.
 
I had time to poke around with Guitar Rig 7 today after learning how to use it (which was pretty easy). It's got an excellent new interface.

The new ICM modeling amps (there are only a handful, most are the legacy versions) sound a little bit better than the previous versions. They still sound like modelers, but I'm fine with it for the way I use plugins.

Nonetheless:

I had a lot of fun playing around with some of the presets! They did a nice job programming them, especially the stuff that's off the beaten path. I'll be able to re-create a lot of the effects chains with my main rig, and that's a nice thing.

Since it came bundled with the iZotope upgrades I needed, and didn't cost extra, I figure it's a nice bonus.
 
I used to be a tube snob but not any longer. Modeling plug ins are actually awesome for a quite a few applications like home recording and low level/high gain practice sessions. Not to mention they are fun just to sit down and play around with.
 
I used to be a tube snob but not any longer. Modeling plug ins are actually awesome for a quite a few applications like home recording and low level/high gain practice sessions. Not to mention they are fun just to sit down and play around with.
This isn't new for me.

I have used modeling as a scratch pad since the days of the kidney POD. I believe I've had every modeling plugin on the market; if not, I've come pretty close.

I think of it as Tube Preference, not Tube Snobbery. And the real thing is still much better sounding - to me. But the modelers CAN be fun, and can also be useful, as you say.

I've had a home studio I've used professionally for my TV ad work for going on 33 years. I still use the real thing for my recorded work. The modelers make excellent scratch pads for trying out parts, though.
 
This isn't new for me.

I have used modeling as a scratch pad since the days of the kidney POD. I believe I've had every modeling plugin on the market; if not, I've come pretty close.

I think of it as Tube Preference, not Tube Snobbery. And the real thing is still much better sounding - to me. But the modelers CAN be fun, and can also be useful, as you say.

I've had a home studio I've used professionally for my TV ad work for going on 33 years. I still use the real thing for my recorded work. The modelers make excellent scratch pads for trying out parts, though.
Wasnt implying that its new for you just my take on them.

They have come a long ways. I think that most players (let alone non players) wouldnt be able to tell the difference in a blind test.

For the average non pro home studio the advantages of modelers has really changed the game IMO. No need for expensive mics, amps, techniques, sound proofed rooms, baffles, processing equipment...etc. Plug n play with pretty amazing results. Just the fact that we can produce the quality that we can now a days with just a laptop and a DAW is amazing in itself....an artists/song writers dream come true.
 
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