Will a daily temp swing of 66 to 73 damage a guitar?

Rowan

New Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
2
This is my first post on the PRS Forum.

Did some searching, but couldn't find any posts on this temperature question.


I have a Hollow Body II that I've had for about 10 years I think. I've only recently started to wonder if I'm putting it, and my other guitars, under stress and at risk of damage by exposing them, daily, to a night time to day time temperature swing of 6 to 7 degrees.

We keep our house at 71 in the day time on weekdays, and 73 in the day time on weekends. Every night, regardless of day, we run the AC to get 'er down to 66 degrees at night. The guitars are in a music room, out on stands (not in their cases) and are exposed to this temp change, twice a day, every day of the year.

Heat pumps don't make rapid temp changes. It takes about 45 minutes at the fastest to make the temp swing one way, or the other. The guitars are not near the heat / cool register vents. I live in Eugene, OR. The humidity is not super high, or very low. Its pretty much Mama Bear porridge just right, and, it doesn't have a large swing change summer to winter. Certainly from any given day to the next, it basically just doesn't change but a tiny amount. So really, its just the temp swing I'm imposing myself that I'm wondering about.

I know.. To read it, 6 to 7 degrees doesn't sound like much of a swing, but, one of the rules I've read says, "Don't expose 'em to anything you wouldn't want". Well, to stand there in the room, middle of the night, and not be under covers.. 66 feels veeery cold (Can't vote to get it warmer. Others in house desire it that cold to sleep). Secondly, this isn't an occasional change. The guitars are exposed to this every night (many thousands of cycles over their life).

I haven't had a problem so far in 15 years for any of them. They don't even go out of tune from morning to evening (takes weeks to go noticeably out of tune).

Like to leave them out because I like to see them. Art work and all.

Umm.. am I blowin' it here?

If I put them in their cases, it wouldn't stop them reaching the two end points of temp. It would just lengthen the swing time a bit.

Thanks so much for your time.


- Rowan
 

SausageofPower

New Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
119
I'm almost certain that your guitars are in NO danger. Typically humidity is the main thing to be aware of (since humidity causes wood to swell and contract). And honestly, a daily temp variance of 6 degrees is nothing. If it was, we'd all be doomed. ;p
 

JMintzer

Bobble Head Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Apr 24, 2012
Messages
2,095
Location
Potomac, MD
Absolutely nothing to worry about.

Just try to keep the humidity constant...


Jamie
 

rugerpc

A♥ hoards guitars ♥A Soldier 25, DFZ
Moderator
Joined
Jun 26, 2012
Messages
6,905
Location
deep in the raspberry...
If your humidity is lower than 45%, you may want to consider a humidifier to get into the range of 45-55%.
 

LSchefman

Hears Tones
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
28,018
If you're concerned, the cases will buffer temp and humidity changes. You could just put 'em away at night.
 

Rowan

New Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
2
If your humidity is lower than 45%, you may want to consider a humidifier to get into the range of 45-55%.

Thanks everyone. I feel much better about this then. Its been on my mind for a while and I kept putting off a post.
I checked the stats, and it says that for Eugene the humidity average are; Lowest of 68 in August. Highest of 86 in February. And the change from month to month is very gradual.

We're moving to Bend in 5 years. Only 150 miles east of here, but its at 3,000 feet and is considered "The high desert" Humidity is much lower there (I've heard of folks saying, "When I first moved there, I wanted to crawl inside a bottle of hand lotion, my skin was so dry" ha..
But, it is very consistent from month to month. Still, I'll check in to getting a humidifier. Thanks for the advice!
 

Mikegarveyblues

Cream Crackered
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
3,060
Location
Warrington, Nr Liverpool UK
get yourself a good quality digital Hygromter/Thermometer.

It'll help you keep a check on the humidity and temps, although as has been pointed out, temps are less of an issue than humidity extremes.
 

garrett

...
Joined
Jul 27, 2012
Messages
6,014
Location
The southern tip of Tampa Bay
Thanks everyone. I feel much better about this then. Its been on my mind for a while and I kept putting off a post.
I checked the stats, and it says that for Eugene the humidity average are; Lowest of 68 in August. Highest of 86 in February. And the change from month to month is very gradual.

We're moving to Bend in 5 years. Only 150 miles east of here, but its at 3,000 feet and is considered "The high desert" Humidity is much lower there (I've heard of folks saying, "When I first moved there, I wanted to crawl inside a bottle of hand lotion, my skin was so dry" ha..
But, it is very consistent from month to month. Still, I'll check in to getting a humidifier. Thanks for the advice!

Man, I'd hate to see your electric bill in the summer! I suggest advising your housemates that there are such things as short sleeve shirts, short pants, light-weight blankets and fans. But I was raised in FL, where 66 degrees is winter weather. :laugh:

The outdoor humidity doesn't necessarily reflect indoor humidity. As someone mentioned, get a hygrometer and take a few measurements throughout the day/night. HVAC systems take some humidity out of the air inside the house. With the HVAC running like crazy, the air might be quite dry and you may want a humidifier for your guitar room.
 

Audiowonderland

New Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
10
Thanks everyone. I feel much better about this then. Its been on my mind for a while and I kept putting off a post.
I checked the stats, and it says that for Eugene the humidity average are; Lowest of 68 in August. Highest of 86 in February. And the change from month to month is very gradual.

We're moving to Bend in 5 years. Only 150 miles east of here, but its at 3,000 feet and is considered "The high desert" Humidity is much lower there (I've heard of folks saying, "When I first moved there, I wanted to crawl inside a bottle of hand lotion, my skin was so dry" ha..
But, it is very consistent from month to month. Still, I'll check in to getting a humidifier. Thanks for the advice!

Yes, but heating and AC can remove a lot of humidity from your home
 
Top