Why do people have more than one?

gemyneye

So many guitars, not enough time
Joined
May 7, 2022
Messages
661
Hi, ok, so I have pondered this and tried to understand. I have noticed that several members will have several guitars of the same model/type. I suppose if you have the means to buy a smorgasbord of guitars, there's that, but other than that, what is the reasoning for having more than one of, say for example, a Custom 24. I supposed if I got some sort of large windfall, I would buy one of each model starting with my most desired first, but even then probably wouldn't get more then one of each.
 

jak3af3r

Jake
Joined
Apr 16, 2018
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964
Location
Nashville, TN
Pairs and spares?

I don't have multiples of PRS but do strats and teles because they're different specs with neck shapes, pickups, bridges, fretboards, body material, etc.

I also gigged those a lot so I had backups in case something happened.

I may do the same later on with PRS too so I have a standard version to go with the "optioned" models I already have.
 

RickP

Established 1960, Still Not Dead
Joined
Dec 10, 2019
Messages
5,061
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Gulf Coast of Texas
I have backups for anything I gig. I always have two of whatever my main guitar is onstage. Most of the time they are the same make and model, but occasionally they are just similar enough to swap out. Usually they’re not the same color finish. This covers malfunctions, string breakage, and just a swap of look for the audience. I have two 513s, two HB Spruces, did have two 594 SCs, and am looking for a reasonably priced NF3 (or one I can trade for). “Two is one, one is none” is a good rule of thumb. As I’ve often said, we’re paid to make music, not excuses.

Guitars that don’t see the stage other than rare appearances are singles. The double thing only goes for “working” guitars. I’m definitely not rich.
 

gemyneye

So many guitars, not enough time
Joined
May 7, 2022
Messages
661
Ah, some points I hadn't pondered. I have never gigged, so I didn't think of that. I hope to, maybe, one day. I haven't broken a string on a guitar while playing in so many years I forgot that's a possibility. I also didn't realize (or didn't think it was possible) that the same model of PRS would feel different. I guess I presumed that the quality maintained that you could pick up any one and it would feel the same.
 
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JasonE

New Member
Joined
May 1, 2012
Messages
610
Location
South Florida
I don't know that I have two that are exactly alike. However, to the untrained eye, it could look like I have quite a few that are the same. A PRS double cut model looks a lot like other PRS double cut models. I have always found the PRS double cuts to be very appealing to the eye and once I got my hands on one, I discovered they play and sound awesome. I have some other brands that have some cross over but they are not exact duplicates.

I have seen a few of my friends that keep buying the same model in different colors. That I don't really understand but they like them and can afford them so they buy them. Sometimes is is all about what excites and motivates you to play your best.
 

Rdwest1

New Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2022
Messages
2
First; to each, their own…. That being said, I have a CE24. I keep that in the case unless I feel like playing it. Recently, I bought a used Custom SE24. The reason is I like to keep something out on a stand next to my desk for easy access. I did use a Mexican made Tele for that, but the differences in the necks was an adjustment. If the SE needs an occasional truss rod tweak, it’s no big deal. I still have American made Srat and Tele that stay in cases unless I specifically want those out.
 

LSchefman

Historical Entity
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
30,396
Location
Michigan
I have backups for anything I gig. I always have two of whatever my main guitar is onstage. Most of the time they are the same make and model, but occasionally they are just similar enough to swap out. Usually they’re not the same color finish. This covers malfunctions, string breakage, and just a swap of look for the audience. I have two 513s, two HB Spruces, did have two 594 SCs, and am looking for a reasonably priced NF3 (or one I can trade for). “Two is one, one is none” is a good rule of thumb. As I’ve often said, we’re paid to make music, not excuses.

Guitars that don’t see the stage other than rare appearances are singles. The double thing only goes for “working” guitars. I’m definitely not rich.
Back in the day, musicians felt lucky to have one nice guitar, and one amp. That's what we had, and that's what we brung.

I got used to that, and ever since I did my first gig in 1966, I've never, ever, gigged with more than one guitar, or more than one amp. This includes major ad gigs in Europe, and shows like SXSW. Lots of the 'name' pros I've hired for sessions have shown up for sessions with only one guitar, even for important jobs.

I always get kinda old-guy snarky when I see a band of dudes in a local bar gig show up with multiple guitars and amps like they're rock stars.

"When I was a boy, we had to walk ten miles to school, in the snow -- without shoes!"

"Yeah, well, your school WAS in a cave during the ice age, and it was before they invented the shoe..."

"OK, but I still have to laugh at the fact that they give children shoes and put them on school buses."
 

gemyneye

So many guitars, not enough time
Joined
May 7, 2022
Messages
661
Back in the day, musicians felt lucky to have one nice guitar, and one amp. That's what we had, and that's what we brung.

I got used to that, and ever since I did my first gig in 1966, I've never, ever, gigged with more than one guitar, or more than one amp. This includes major ad gigs in Europe, and shows like SXSW. Lots of the 'name' pros I've hired for sessions have shown up for sessions with only one guitar, even for important jobs.

I always get kinda old-guy snarky when I see a band of dudes in a local bar gig show up with multiple guitars and amps like they're rock stars.

"When I was a boy, we had to walk ten miles to school, in the snow -- without shoes!"

"Yeah, well, your school WAS in a cave during the ice age, and it was before they invented the shoe..."

"OK, but I still have to laugh at the fact that they give children shoes and put them on school buses."
You forgot "uphill both ways." lol
 

RickP

Established 1960, Still Not Dead
Joined
Dec 10, 2019
Messages
5,061
Location
Gulf Coast of Texas
Back in the day, musicians felt lucky to have one nice guitar, and one amp. That's what we had, and that's what we brung.

I got used to that, and ever since I did my first gig in 1966, I've never, ever, gigged with more than one guitar, or more than one amp. This includes major ad gigs in Europe, and shows like SXSW. Lots of the 'name' pros I've hired for sessions have shown up for sessions with only one guitar, even for important jobs.

I always get kinda old-guy snarky when I see a band of dudes in a local bar gig show up with multiple guitars and amps like they're rock stars.

"When I was a boy, we had to walk ten miles to school, in the snow -- without shoes!"

"Yeah, well, your school WAS in a cave during the ice age, and it was before they invented the shoe..."

"OK, but I still have to laugh at the fact that they give children shoes and put them on school buses."
Oh yeah, back in the 70s I just had an SG and a Lab Series L5 or Ampeg V4. I played lots of gigs that way. It was those gigs, whether through my struggles or those of others, that I learned that my life goes easier with some redundancy. With it, I’ve not only saved myself, but bailed out a few under-prepared band mates.

I know others, much better known than me, go without. It’s a choice. To me, it’s irresponsible to not put the client and audience first, so far as you’re able. Mishaps happen, and a toppled guitar with a broken headstock isn’t making anyone happy. It’s just my thing… my way of doing it. In my eyes, it’s professionalism.

I’ve never had any heartburn or bad feelings with guys who show up with just one of everything. But I have loaned out a lot of pieces over the years to those same guys. I respect their decision, but don’t emulate it.
 

gemyneye

So many guitars, not enough time
Joined
May 7, 2022
Messages
661
Ouch! Breaking a headstock during a performance? Must be one heck of a concert :p I suppose if you are doing a seated jazz concert could be different than a mosh metal performance. lol
 

LSchefman

Historical Entity
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
30,396
Location
Michigan
Hi, ok, so I have pondered this and tried to understand. I have noticed that several members will have several guitars of the same model/type. I suppose if you have the means to buy a smorgasbord of guitars, there's that, but other than that, what is the reasoning for having more than one of, say for example, a Custom 24. I supposed if I got some sort of large windfall, I would buy one of each model starting with my most desired first, but even then probably wouldn't get more then one of each.
I forgot to respond to the actual post!

It's occurred to me that there's no logical reason to have more than one electric guitar, let alone more than one of the same model. Yet I have a handful of guitars myself (though they're different models).

Because even my own behavior raises questions in my mind, I decided to get out the old Ouija Board, contact the Great Beyond, and ask my friend Dr. Freud for his opinion. Here's his reply:

"Hello again Les. There are actually several reasons. One buys more of the same model in part for the very same reason people take more heroin. One dose of heroin makes you feel good. But the feeling wears off. So you decide that a second dose will make you feel good again. Of course, it only does temporarily, and you need yet another dose. Et cetera.

"Rationalizations are made to justify these additional guitar 'doses', but none of the reasons are significant. They're excuses for irrational behavior. The attachment to one single model of instrument is really just more proof of this strong need to identify with and calm a longing to feel good in a particular way.

"However it is also the case that though the identification with a new and more perfect version of the same type of object, your unconscious mind wishes to assuage fears that you yourself are undergoing entropy and are headed down the road to old age and death. A new object is bought to subconsciously renew your own belief in your immortality, which of course is itself irrational.

"After buying more stuff, you have to prove the truth of these rationalizations to avoid feelings of guilt and shame, so you drag additional guitars to gigs. After all, if you say you need more than one guitar to gig, your own illogic demands that you follow through.

"Of course, it's somewhat painful and tiring to do that, which satisfies your subconscious need to punish yourself."

"Thanks, Doc. Well, at least buying more guitars doesn't cause health problems beyond having a bad back."

"I wouldn't say that, Les. Your wife wants to kill you every time you buy another instrument. You might be pushing your luck. Death isn't exactly healthy."

"So what's the cure, Doc?"

"We'll have to explore that. What's your earliest memory of your mother..."
 
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