Why are PRS Silversky Core backlogged for a year now? Aren't they made in Maryland?

LSchefman

Historical Entity
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
28,428
Location
Michigan
This can be a huge political rabbit hole, but I will offer these thoughts:

Undoubtedly there are people who found it easier to accept the "handouts" for the "free money" value vs finding work (either old job or a new one). But I don't think there are millions in this category. And the folks who do take that easy money might not be the best skilled workforce anyway - I assume the vast majority of jobs at PRS involve some level of skill, either through training or experience, and some combo of inherent talent. Or maybe I'm naïve.

I also suspect some people found that after losing their jobs (and maybe not even getting much in the way of handouts) that their quality of life didn't change, or perhaps improved, overall - the expenses and time associated with working were replaced by not having to spend on daycare, transportation, etc, combined with maybe they experienced an increase in general happiness level. Especially easy to transition if they have a working spouse.

And thirdly, I suspect some people decided to retire a bit early. So they just never re-entered the workforce.

And as a result, with fewer people in the available workforce, there is less desire to accept a lower-quality job. A minor glut in a workforce suppresses hourly rates easily ("Oh, you don't want to do that job for $8/hr? That's OK, I can find someone else hungrier."), whereas a minor drought in a workforce means many people have the opportunity to look around for something better, and because there aren't as many candidates, employers will pay more to attract and keep "talent". And turnover is an expensive hidden cost, so a smart employer includes that in their cost of keeping an employee at a higher salary vs replacement talent at a lower salary (you hope).

So, for example: If PRS pays what would normally be a competitive ("livable", "fair", whatever term you like) wage for the skilled labor they employ, then the should be able to maintain a stable workforce - but only if there is a suitably available local workforce. If Telsa starts building guitars in Texas and pays triple the normal salary, there might be a huge migration of the workforce from MD to TX, draining MD of a skilled workforce in building guitars. So even if PRS doubles their normal "reasonable" wage they might not be able to attract enough qualified personnel. Overpaying under-skilled workers generates problems for everyone (even the employee, who can feel frustrated at not being able to perform).
These are really good points.

My aim in my post (above) isn't at all political. I think until the topic is seriously studied down the road, we can only guess at whatever the motivating factors have been.

One thing I didn't mention in my post is the extent to which problems in foreign companies that supply parts, raw materials and labor for subassemblies have been affected.

One small example among many: One of the industries in Ukraine and Russia that has been greatly affected by the war is the production of automotive wiring looms that were previously supplied to automakers all over the world.
 

CVS

Not so new member
Joined
Jun 6, 2014
Messages
2,138
Location
Southern California
Thanks. It’s the first guitar I’ve ever bought where I haven’t been able to put hands on a similar one first. I have high confidence though
I have 2 SS's - one maple neck - one rosewood fretboard. If you have played Strat's, I think you will find the SS a joy to play and the tones are more Strat like than many of the Strats that I have played over the years. Can't wait to see pics and your thoughts.
 

CVS

Not so new member
Joined
Jun 6, 2014
Messages
2,138
Location
Southern California
Often overlooked is the fact that COVID hospitalizations by age group are pretty evenly distributed. While it's true that deaths predominate among older folks, there are currently as many 18-49 age group hospitalizations as those over 65. Add in the 50-65 age group and you have even more.

Throw in the people who stay home sick for several days but aren't hospitalized, and you have a pretty good-sized slice of working people whose absence has done a lot to screw up the supply chain.

Also, COVID has killed over 210,000 people under the age of 65 in the US. Dead people can't work (as far as we know...).



I realize you were half-joking, but it'll be interesting to see whether that's in fact true, when the statistics are analyzed. I have my doubts.

There have also been a ton of working mothers who were stuck at home, home-schooling their kids. That's a lot of lost productivity, and several I know personally decided to bite the bullet, quit their jobs, and just work part-time (if at all).
Just wanted to add on more through to the above - given the current cost of gas, there may be quite a few people deciding not to work or accept jobs with long commutes, as is the case for many people in my area. Just adds to the workplace shortage issues.
 
Top