Which era influenced you most?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by vchizzle, Feb 27, 2018.

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which decade influenced you most?

  1. 50's

    1 vote(s)
    1.8%
  2. 60's

    14 vote(s)
    25.5%
  3. 70's

    31 vote(s)
    56.4%
  4. 80's

    21 vote(s)
    38.2%
  5. 90's

    12 vote(s)
    21.8%
  6. 2000-2009

    4 vote(s)
    7.3%
  7. I live in the present!

    4 vote(s)
    7.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. 11top

    11top Cousin Eddie's cousin

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    While I liked earlier (and certainly later) music, this little band called the Beatles and the British Invasion took me to a place from which I could never return.
     
  2. Huggy B

    Huggy B Hmm... kinda tangy.

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    Of all the many Sergio posts over the years, and there have been many, *THIS* one took the words right out of my mouth. I think musical innovation really slowed down with automation's takeover of the music industry, samplers, drum machines & synths can mostly only recreate, emulate, fabricate, and manipulate sounds and beats that have already been created.

    My biggest influence was the 70's because it was the last generation of musicians that did it naturally, without programming machines. The 80's had some great stuff as musicianship and tech were neck & neck, but by the end of the decade tech had taken over. In the 90's there were some important things going on, Grunge, Neosoul, Acid Jazz, but they were short lived, mostly a tribute to past eras, and were overshadowed by the HipHop & TechnoPop that was taking over. What we're left with today.

    Being jazz fan, the 50's & early 60's are also influential to me, but that's a smaller slice of my musical DNA because it was before my lifetime and I was playing with my Godzilla toy and watching the Flintstones in the late 60's so I was never a Dead-head or Hippie. The 70's was the era of the Guitar gods and to this day, a rockin' song without a guitar solo seems always missing something to me.:cool:
     
  3. Bran_Flakes

    Bran_Flakes New Member

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    Lol I'm the first one to select what I assumed would be classified as "now". To start, the 80's explain themselves a bit more I think. I wasn't alive then, but Slash, Steve Clark, Neal Schon, and a whole other number of guitar players are why I play how I do today, albeit I don't listen to them much anymore.

    For the reason behind now, it would definitely be that I'm exploring the Christian sides of music, and there have been some pretty fantastic ones that have come out. There's fewer "guitar heroes" that exist in the genre, although they're still there (Lincoln Brewster is an extremely solid player). The main influence in this genre though is how well it all flows together imo. This genre has really gotten much more solid and more articulate with bands like Hillsong, Bethel, and others putting out fantastically crafted songs, so that's been a huge influence on the writing side of my playing.
     
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  4. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    I said 60s and 90s only because my band activity began in the 60s, and my scoring/production work got going in the 90s. So it makes sense that those two decades of “awakening” were influential for me.

    But if you think about it, music is a continuum that can’t be logically sliced and diced into “sounds of decades.”

    Every so often a few folks come along who change the game a little, and other people are influenced by them, and try to sound like them, but then someone else comes along, changes the game again, rinse and repeat. And meanwhile, some styles of music undergo minimal change, some undergo gradual change, etc.

    That’s got very little to do with the fact that, “wow, it’s 2018, let’s do something different,” and more to do with tastes and trends gradually tipping the balance.

    The 60s’ biggest hit was “The Twist” by Chubby Checker. Not The Beatles. The third biggest hit was “Theme From A Summer Place” by Percy Faith and his Orchestra. “Hello Dolly” outsold most rock songs and was #1 for a long time. “Sugar Sugar” by The Archies outsold every 60s band but the Beatles and Stones, and so did “Love is Blue” by Paul Mauriat and his Orchestra in 1968. But when we think of 60s music, most don’t think of Broadway, orchestral music and bubble gum, right? So, what’s the “music of the 60s?” Well, it’s everything.

    So was the music of every era. It was everything people listen to. And the longer you’re around, the more that music from various periods that you can relate to for whatever reason is woven into your life’s fabric and influences your work.

    A couple of weeks ago, Kraftwerk won a Grammy. It wasn’t a pity Grammy. They had a very successful tour and album of new versions of their 70s music, and echoes of their early work are all over various electronic music styles that people break up into what for me are indistinguishable from one another (funkstep vs darkstep vs hard step, really??)

    I think when we say the music of some little span of time was our influence, we’re focusing in on times in our lives when we woke up a little more to the music scene than usual, for whatever reason.

    And even then, we’re each focused on only a tiny fraction of what was happening then, as with my example of the hits of the 60s. When I say my inflences include 60s music, trust me, I’m not thinking of “Hello, Dolly”. But someone else certainly is. Sounds of the 70s? How many of you are saying, “The Captain and Tennile” influnced your music?
     
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  5. Wakester

    Wakester Re Member

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    You are correct about how Christian Contemporary Music really flows together. It's as if they have found the key to combine several genres and influences to make near perfect music. Third Day, Casting Crowns and even Toby Mac have excelled because they can get the message out, as well as blend their musical styles so that no one part or instrument is greater than another.
     
  6. DreamTheaterRules

    DreamTheaterRules New and improved member

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    White Cross and King James (Rex Carroll), Angelica, Narnia, Guardian... that should keep you busy for a while.
     
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  7. Bill SAS 513

    Bill SAS 513 Just another old guy in a T-shirt

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    Gotta Go 60's and 70's...60's simply for the love of early Clapton, Beck, Page stuff, and 70's cuz I think that's the tone I strive for when messing with pedals...OD/Dist. into some nice delay...than add other fx to taste. 70's Rush is the tone to die for...(chorus, flange, etc...)
     
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  8. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    I could make the joke that 70s Rush is the tone to die from, not for, but in truth I give them credit for a long career that any of us might envy.
     
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  9. alantig

    alantig SSBMA

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    I listen to satellite radio, although the merger of Sirius and XM really cut down their playlists - go figure, with Clear Channel so heavily involved. Bad enough they killed terrestrial radio. I do find some new stuff there occasionally, but it's nothing like it used to be. I can remember calling radio stations to find out who they'd played or what a given song title was or even where they found a rare track (like k.d. lang's live version of "Big Boned Gal", which turned out to be on a German CD single). Now I find out about most of the new music I find on a couple forums (like this one) or when I see a band live.
     
  10. vchizzle

    vchizzle Birdman.

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    [QUOTE="LSchefman, post: 374585, member: 812]

    I think when we say the music of some little span of time was our influence, we’re focusing in on times in our lives when we woke up a little more to the music scene than usual, for whatever reason[/QUOTE]
    This is really the point of the thread.
     
  11. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    This is really the point of the thread.[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, I was just pontificating. You know me. I can’t resist a good pontification.
     
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  12. Lister

    Lister Playing guitar badly since the 70's...

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    Ooh, tuff question...I'd have a hard time just picking 2...I was and still am influenced by everything from 50's music through bands like Blackberry Smoke today.
    My Dad had a very eclectic record collection that had everything from bluegrass, classic country, folk, crooners, surf and early rock. I would spend hours listening to Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Buck Owens(Don Rich for most underappreciated/forgotten guitarist?), Peter, Paul and Mary, the Kingston Trio, Elvis, Sandy Nelson, Fats Domino, and the Beach Boys while discovering bands like Led Zep, the Beatles, Stones, Cream, and Hendrix on my own. So if I had to narrow it down I could probably get by with 3, the 50's, 60's and 70's but even then, I'd be leaving out a portion of my influences: SRV for example, didn't come into his own until 83's Texas Flood, but he definitely had an influence on me.
     
  13. vchizzle

    vchizzle Birdman.

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    Yeah, I was just pontificating. You know me. I can’t resist a good pontification.[/QUOTE]
    Ha, I know there’s no Les response without pontification. :D
     
  14. Parralax view

    Parralax view New Member

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    It's something I think of often. I was not into Zep and many of the other bands that were automatic favorites of the era. I am now, but not then. I was more an old blues and old rock kid than I was anything else.I played briefly with a band called "Babes in black" way back as a kid, and they were more into Yardbirds, Beatles etc. I guess I just gravitated toward what I liked and left what is considered now, vital music to the side until later.
     
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  15. Bill SAS 513

    Bill SAS 513 Just another old guy in a T-shirt

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    Awwwww, C'mon man...Hemispheres and Permanent Waves...Great tones...all Alex! Ok, Waves was 80...but who's checkin`...
     
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  16. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Excellent tones and skillful playing. But as with most Rush music, it’s all very square-to-the-meter. From that era of Prog, I like bands like Yes, who had a different rhythm section focus.

    But I’m way overplaying my hand here, because it’s just about preferences. They’re certainly a good band, and wtf do I know, anyway?
     
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  17. bluefade

    bluefade New Member

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    The VENTURES and SURF music hooked me...Then along came JIMI and I began the endless journey...
     
  18. Bill SAS 513

    Bill SAS 513 Just another old guy in a T-shirt

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    Agree to most counts, Les...and I'd bet you know a good chunk or two about those prog days...with us being old and all that!!
     
  19. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Nah, you probably know more than I do. Also, I’m old, you’re not.
     
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  20. Dusty Chalk

    Dusty Chalk alberngruppenführer

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    Everyone always forgets the renaissance— I mean, c’mon people, the invention of polyphony and harmony! Before then, everything was played monophonically —if there were multiple singers, they’d all sing the same melody synchronously. And then one day Ishmael came in late and the round was invented.

    Also, late romantic—that’s when things really took off and started getting bombastic. I love bombast.
     
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