Well, This Is What Was Supposed to Happen...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by CandidPicker, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Feed & Seed

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    My boss had asked me if I might be interested in some extra paid hours for work this week, but realizing that it's Valentine's this week, work will be exceptionally busy and rather demanding, realizing I'd need to give my best effort several days in a row (which is next to impossible, knowing that no one can be next to perfect several days in a row).

    So I gave the boss a call...

    We settled on an extra shift of work after Valentine's Day also knowing that "truck day" would be the day previous, also when my work shift was included. ("Truck day" is when new product arrives from the warehouse)

    Usually, the boss doesn't need me the extra day, but thought to offer the extra hours because of Valentine's Day and that our business would be swamped with customers on "truck day" itself, which would mean the boss would need extra employees to cover in following days so product could be put out on shelves.

    I could use the extra money, but don't need the added stress.

    In your opinions, what is the polite way to let my boss know that "giving 100% all the time might lead to employee burnout?"
     
    #1 CandidPicker, Feb 11, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  2. xjbebop

    xjbebop Yippy ki yay!

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    If you like your job, you should say "Yes Sir, how can I help? I will do my best to meet your needs..."
    Unless you have a medical condition, there is no reason you shouldn't be able to " give my best effort several days in a row "...
    A lot of people have done exactly that for many, many years in a row, myself included.
     
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  3. veinbuster

    veinbuster Freeze zone

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    I generally felt that my job was to give 100% all the time I was working. I was prepared to decline invitations to give additional time on a frequent basis - I was protective of my family’s time.

    I did book all birthdays and anniversaries off well ahead of time to avoid potential conflicts.
     
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  4. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc Get in, loser, we’re going shopping.

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    Is this you, Bob?
     
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  5. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Feed & Seed

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    My job is enjoyable, and like many others, try to give 100% each day I work. That being said, my personal health condition is limited in that my work schedule allows me only 2 days (or 3 maximum) per week before experiencing any health problems. The downside is, the state regulates how much money I can earn per year.

    This is good to know. My boss is likewise flexible with my schedule and allows time away from work if requested at least 2 weeks in advance. He also allows me to choose my own work hours though we usually settle on at least one day that is required work.

    What about you folks? Do you experience health concerns if ever feeling that you might be pushing yourself beyond your own limits to do better?
     
    #5 CandidPicker, Feb 11, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  6. Rider1260

    Rider1260 New Member

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    Thats a tough one, I have been lucky is some sense as I have just passed my 36 yr Anv with the same company, and at present have no real health issue. My work is demanding mentally and physically but I enjoy the challenge and the folks I work with are a very interesting lot.
    I am working more now than ever often between 60 and 90 hours a week many away from home.
    Pushing my boundary's is what's kept me in demand all these years ( and into the future I hope )
    Best of luck in your future !!!!!
     
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  7. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Depends on the job. Being a former manager of teams from 5 to 85 employees I'd be fooling myself to think they always gave 100%. Expectations vary, depending on the time of the month (some parts of the month being busier than others), weather conditions, workload, etc. I was the manager that didn't want you in if you were sick. I don't need you spreading that crap to everyone else. "Stop being selfish and thinking of yourself. We can cover you". I get that people think the world will stop spinning if they aren't there, but that simply is false. AS long as you build a strong team, that is.

    It also depends on your manager. As a manager, I worked for a Director that was verbally abusive, harassing, and a micro-manager. Talk about loving the job, but hating to be there! That's a tough call. I will admit, there were days that I called in sick, or didn't give it my best, due to the hostile work environment. He was a top scorer in the stack rankings, and got a lot out of our employees (we managers took the abuse, he was great to the people that worked for us), and avoided a couple of brushes with HR. It finally got him, and he was fired.

    I'm still with the same company (working on year 32), but in a different role. One that allows me to work from home almost exclusively. I'm up and on line at 4:30 every morning, and shut down at 4:30 each afternoon. Do I work 12 hours straight? No. I obviously take time to roll through this forum several times a day (I am only active one other place, on-line). However, I am available for that time, and I get my work done, and then some. I'll say this, I've taken 3 sick days in the last 3 years (5 if you count two I took for Dr. procedures, but those were planned). I have certainly been sick more than 3 days, but now I can sit on the couch with my laptop and get my tasks done, and meet my objectives. That's a far cry from 28 years ago when I was pulling a cart with a tool kit, vacuum cleaner, and parts tub around the streets of downtown Chicago wrenching on copiers. There was no way I could do that job if I was sick.

    So, I guess it all comes back to individual circumstance!
     
  8. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Feed & Seed

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    I'm happy to hear your job is still keeping you busy and that you are a valued employee. My job is much like yours, though with less hours. The customer interchange is enjoyable, you meet a variety of people each day, speak with folks when you have time, otherwise, the same Q/A occurs most of the time, and mutual respect is given and taken.

    I think I've worked with the same business for coming up on 19 years now. And would like to keep my job if possible. I've got all my hair and my teeth, so I don't see why my employer would consider replacing me with a younger person. (My rugged good looks :rolleyes: aren't part of the job requirement, though my arriving for work is.)
     
  9. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Feed & Seed

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    I'd guess that there will always be tire-kickers now matter where you work or live.

    It seems your work ethic is a good one, though when folks invariably become tired, their immune systems are the first things compromised. I notice that on my off-days, if I ever start to nod, I'll power nap for 40 minutes. Although that sometimes messes up my sleep patterns, at least I'm not sleep-deprived. And yes, this is usually the reason why people go home after 1) working out , or 2) doing errands and preparing dinner, feeling tired knowing they've put in a decent day's work.

    My Dad usually worked a 9-hour workday at least 5 days a week from the time he was hired out of college until he retired in the late 80's. It took at toll on his health (Dad enjoyed a minimum of two 3 oz. cocktails each day to unwind, his heart, liver & kidneys) so I'd prefer to not follow that example too closely nor suffer the way my Dad did in his later years.

    Though my Dad didn't exercise, mow the lawn, or do yard work, though he did work in his garden and spent an inordinate time planning, planting, tending and harvesting. Dad assigned the tasks of yard work and mowing the lawn to members of the family and provided us with an allowance for our work. We learned the value of work and we were paid for our labor. I miss the old guy sometimes (wiping away a tear and a Kleenex).

    So, yeah. I sometimes wonder if my health will ever decline the way my Dad's did; if my health will follow that of my Dad's, or my Mom's side of the family? (My Mom is a strong woman and in good health). Perhaps if one practices good habits and avoids bad ones, perhaps that's a step in the correct direction.

    The remaining is only educated guesswork, smiling inwardly at foolishness, asking and answering questions, and correcting when necessary.
     
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  10. Moose6

    Moose6 New Member

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    Many probably won't like to hear this, but it's true. As a manager, those that put in 100% are those that have earned my trust. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on their point of view, I count on them to do the extra work. At the end of the day those that I don't trust, or don't put in 100%, ultimately are expendable. that being said, it is a delicate juggling act to determine when you can put in the extra work, and balance that with family time, personal time.

    as far as those people who think their stuff doesn't stink, I once had a professor say, "don't take yourself too seriously, it only takes 15 minutes to replace you on a bad day, because they are 10 other people out there waiting to do your job, possibly better than you can"!
     
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  11. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Feed & Seed

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    I think a positive attitude has a lot to do with that. One can be "serious" and hard-working, but still maintain a positive attitude. I usually remember to smile and greet people with a friendly manner, trying to identify when they might be having a tough time of things themselves. Sometimes you can draw them out a little, but if they're reserved, all one can do is offer your heartfelt wishes they feel better soon.

    And that is actually part of my job description, displaying empathy for others. In my job, one needs to remember that the job itself is not always about how much one accomplishes at work, but if the customers are happy and will be back again for more business. This is why I love my job...it affords me the opportunity to be a diligent worker who places importance on customer satisfaction first, and actual work output second. And that is how my boss thinks my job is to be done.
     

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