The Easiest Amps To Record With - Share Your Thoughts

LSchefman

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Another thread here on the Forum reminded me that amps can be extremely easy to record, or a bit more challenging.

I've always favored amps that could get great sounds on tape or hard disk without too much fussing around.

"What's meant by 'easy to record', Les?"

"Stick a 57 or a 421 in front of the cab, hit record, and it sounds like a record."

"Then what's 'fussing around'?

"Having to dick around with placement to the nth degree, set up a room mic, etc."

"Fine. Then what amps are easiest for you?"

"I'm going to let everyone else discuss this before I chime in. I've been blah-blah-blah-ing for way too long about this stuff. I want opinions from other people because it's an interesting topic! Therefore, I think it should be open to discussion without my comments influencing opinion."

"Dude. You NEVER influence anyone else's opinion."

"That's probably a good thing!"
 

Bogner

Redwood Original - Pure Blood
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Well, I will take the bait. :)

The Diezel VH4 is one of the best tracking amps I have ever played. Out of all the amps I have worked with it very well may be tops in this discussion for me. That doesn't mean it is my all time favorite amp to play but it is way up there on my list. Soldano SLO-100 is another amp that I found easy to track. I will leave it there for now and eagerly see how this thread/conversation progresses...it is a good one Les! :)
 

Black Plaid

Other Alan!
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I worked in a project studio long ago, and I cut a lot of tracks for bands using my Tri-axis, 50/50 and an old Marsha 1960 straight loaded with greenbacks.

Why did they use my amp so much? Cause they were small local bands to Santa Cruz and had ... iffy ... gear.

I think the easiest amp is the one you know.
 

goat-n-gitter

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My Mesa amps have always been very easy to record - Like you said, Les, just stick a 57 or MD421 in front of them and go to town. Or, I can use my Torpedo Captor X in place of speakers/mics and it sounds great. My AC-30 is a bit more fussy, but not too hard to capture.
I'll be honest though, when I am "scratch padding" parts, I often still use my old POD XT, and the couple of presets that I don't hate work well enough that if I get an inspired take, it may make it to the final mix.
 

LSchefman

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My Mesa amps have always been very easy to record - Like you said, Les, just stick a 57 or MD421 in front of them and go to town. Or, I can use my Torpedo Captor X in place of speakers/mics and it sounds great. My AC-30 is a bit more fussy, but not too hard to capture.
I'll be honest though, when I am "scratch padding" parts, I often still use my old POD XT, and the couple of presets that I don't hate work well enough that if I get an inspired take, it may make it to the final mix.
I sometimes write and work out parts using amp sims, too - they're great for that purpose, and several others - I just don't use them in the final recording.
 

veinbuster

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I sometimes write and work out parts using amp sims, too - they're great for that purpose, and several others - I just don't use them in the final recording.
I think that’s the way I would go. Then profile the amp as the piece was recorded so I could play that sound if anyone wanted to listen to it live. I think that’s what a modellers job is.
 

danktat

Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist
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On this album I have been working on over the past several months, I mainly used a Hot Rod DeVille. But also a Splawn, 2 Different Orange amps, A 65 Amps (which I must admit was GREAT when pushing it with an old Gretsch full hollow), and a Matchless. Here is the thing. What was "easiest"? Well for me, they were all equally easy as all I did was play. The producer and engineers did all the setup and miking. ;) I am pretty sure, if I had to do it all myself, it would be the DeVille. Not because it is the top of the line. Or the best of the lot. But because I know it front and back as it is my main gigging amp. So I know what it is "supposed" to sound like when I play it.

But, even after all this recording, I am still quite the novice when it comes to studio work. Fun, but I can't say that I actually "know what I am doing".
 

andy474x

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Hmm

My Custom 50 has always been a good one, and the new HDRX is seeing a lot of action, and working very well, on the piece I’m working on right now. It’s not long or complex, but there are several guitar layers.

There are many great things about those amps, but one of the big ones for me is that they don’t have an over-abundance of low and low-mid, which usually makes them semi track-ready. Certainly some light EQ often, but not having to totally mangle the sound. Playing mostly humbucker guitars makes that an important attribute.

They’re also very pliable when it comes to working with a wide range of the drive pedals I have.

I work very hard finding the right speakers for each amp, because that’s one of the big factors that can make or break the sound when I record. A person could probably EQ and mic manipulate around that if they were very smart and experienced. Those aren’t my adjectives!
 

LSchefman

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But, even after all this recording, I am still quite the novice when it comes to studio work. Fun, but I can't say that I actually "know what I am doing".
The good news is that you're learning by doing, and getting a feel for which amps deliver the sound to a recording medium in ways that work for you.

The key to the whole thing about recording is "Ways that work for you." Because the only rules that make sense in recording are the ones that you pick.

I work very hard finding the right speakers for each amp, because that’s one of the big factors that can make or break the sound when I record. A person could probably EQ and mic manipulate around that if they were very smart and experienced. Those aren’t my adjectives!
I've heard some of your recorded stuff, I would say you're smart and experienced enough! Besides, you're actually a very smart guy. And a good player. And the tracks I heard sounded really good.

PS - You're also talented.
 

andy474x

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I've heard some of your recorded stuff, I would say you're smart and experienced enough! Besides, you're actually a very smart guy. And a good player. And the tracks I heard sounded really good.

PS - You're also talented.

Ha!

My opinion on most fields of expertise... there are 4 levels of knowledge that one can progress through

1. Knowing nothing
2. Knowing something, and thinking you know everything
3. Knowing just a little more, and realizing you still know basically nothing
4. Knowing a lot, and still recognizing there's more to learn

Sometimes I make it to #3, and other times I get cocky and move down to #2!!!

Nonetheless, I should be happy to accept the compliment from someone who is a solid level 4!

Hopefully I'll have something to share soon. I'm off to work on it now!
 
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