Studio model (current style). Maple neck or mahog or doesn't matter?

dilznik

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So I've narrowed down my next purchase to a Studio. But seeing as there are narrowfields involved, is the sound going to be "better" with mahogany or a maple neck? I don't have access to a maple one to try out since they're Wood Library only. I've read some posts from people with the old Swamp Ash Studio who said they got Strat sounds out of the 2 and 4 positions with the bolt on maple necks. Would it make much of a difference coughing up an extra $1000+ for a maple neck or would it not really be noticeable?

Extra points if you can explain without using the word "warmth" because using a temperature to measure sound never made any sense to me.
 
I'd say it depends on what you want to get from the instrument. Maple necks have a more immediate note attack, which can add focus and help things "pop" more on neck and middle pickups. If you're hoping to get a lot of use out of all the pickups, and want to get closer to a Strat sound, I'd say go for the maple. If you want a fat sounding bridge humbucker most of the time, and occasional use of the neck/middle pickups, go hog.
 
I'd say it depends on what you want to get from the instrument. Maple necks have a more immediate note attack, which can add focus and help things "pop" more on neck and middle pickups. If you're hoping to get a lot of use out of all the pickups, and want to get closer to a Strat sound, I'd say go for the maple. If you want a fat sounding bridge humbucker most of the time, and occasional use of the neck/middle pickups, go hog.

Beat me to it. I’m a maple neck -addict- aficionado who would definitely steer you towards that on a Studio if the sound you’re looking for is “HSS hot Strat”. I actually had a Swamp Ash Studio until recently when it got replaced with an MEV. The SAS 2/4 position sounds were passable with low gain, but I always had to roll back the volume a bit to get clear quack out of them. Not to turn this into an MEV thread since the Studio is awesome and really has its own vibe…





Edit: now with more shameless, gratuitous, bad-ashery
 
When trying for Strat tones with a maple neck, I’d say an ash body is critical. Maple neck on a hog body is definitely tighter with a faster transient, though. The hog neck and body is rock and roll royalty with tones that are so hot, they’re less than hot at the same time, and never cool or cold . They’re TOASTY.
 
I'd pass on the upcharge for the neck and put it towards another amp or set of pedals. Whatever difference might exist between the two is most likely negligible to the majority of listeners by the time you go through amps and pedals.

Since temperature descriptions of sounds are unhelpful, how about actually hearing sounds...


This has 3 completely different guitars and so far only one person has correctly identified the 3 but not in the correct order.

At the end of the day, I'd buy the one that you like playing the best and worry about tweaking the sound later.
 
Beat me to it. I’m a maple neck -addict- aficionado who would definitely steer you towards that on a Studio if the sound you’re looking for is “HSS hot Strat”. I actually had a Swamp Ash Studio until recently when it got replaced with an MEV. The SAS 2/4 position sounds were passable with low gain, but I always had to roll back the volume a bit to get clear quack out of them. Not to turn this into an MEV thread since the Studio is awesome and really has its own vibe…





Edit: now with more shameless, gratuitous, bad-ashery
That top in teal fade looks unreal! I love when Brian does runs in that color.
 
I've had a couple of PRS models with both maple and mahogany necks (McCartys and 594s)

They sound a little different, especially on the neck pickup, which has a more "hollow" or "flutey" sound. A maple fretboard does add a sharper, more immediate attack, which most people interpret as brightness, but it's really just a different ADSR envelope.

You'll mostly hear the differences the cleaner you play. At higher gain levels it becomes a bit academic.

BTW, "Warm" in audio usually describes a frequency response where the high frequencies don't predominate over other frequencies. In other words, less brightness.

A warm microphone, for example, doesn't exaggerate high frequencies and often sounds more like a voice in a room. Etc.
 
Maple gives more pop and almost percussive quality to the attack and blossom of a note. Mahogany necks seem smoother and darker. I vastly prefer maple for clean tones especially single coil type tones. I strongly prefer mahogany for high gain rhythm work. I’ve found I’ll never get the perfect all in one guitar for my preferences so whenever I’m looking at a specific guitar I ask myself what I really want out of it and what it lends itself too. I would say the narrow fields have a sparkly sort of jangly sound (don’t you love the way guitarists describe tone?) so if you want to accentuate that then go maple.
 
Not to turn this into an MEV thread since the Studio is awesome and really has its own vibe…
Go ahead and sell me... I'm listening ;)

I'd pass on the upcharge for the neck and put it towards another amp or set of pedals.
ANOTHER amp? I already have 10, what am I going to do with another one?! And more pedals? I have like 100! Want to buy some pedals?
 
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