Random. No more or less

I mentioned this before but now this year I think if doing it a lot. After June I will be working somewhere part time for the sake of my sanity but I really thought of the idea of putting on a rock show with local area residents in our local park. No one has attempted anything like this ever before. It would a labour of love. I have a very good friend that is very knowledgeable in these matters and I know will help me.

A lot of hoops to jump through I realize but I really need something like this to focus on.
 
I mentioned this before but now this year I think if doing it a lot. After June I will be working somewhere part time for the sake of my sanity but I really thought of the idea of putting on a rock show with local area residents in our local park. No one has attempted anything like this ever before. It would a labour of love. I have a very good friend that is very knowledgeable in these matters and I know will help me.

A lot of hoops to jump through I realize but I really need something like this to focus on.
I say Go For It!
 
When someone tells you:

“You Look Great for Your Age."
This seemingly complimentary remark is a veiled reinforcement of ageism, implying that aging is undesirable and that value is tied to youthfulness. Instead, offer unambiguous praise like, “You look great,” which appreciates the person without age-related conditions.
  1. “She’s Too Old to Do That.” Such statements severely underestimate older adults and perpetuate outdated ideas of what aging “should” look like. Let's encourage and celebrate the diverse interests and capabilities of older adults, recognizing their right to engage in fulfilling activities at any age.
  2. “Senior Moment.” Describing memory lapses as “senior moments” not only trivializes the issue but also fosters negative stereotypes about cognitive aging. It's crucial to understand that while memory disorders are more common in older adulthood, they are not normal. Mindful language involves not attributing minor forgetfulness to age and recognizing that everyone, irrespective of age, can have moments of distraction.
  3. “Act Your Age.” This phrase often aims to regulate behavior seen as inappropriate for one’s age, reinforcing rigid and outdated norms. In my work on sexual health and aging, I encourage health providers to confront their biases about aging and sexuality. It’s important to support individuals in embracing their authentic selves at every age.
  4. “Old Dogs Can’t Learn New Tricks." This cliché wrongly suggests that older individuals are inherently averse to learning or new experiences. Research shows that resistance to change is less about age and more about individual openness. Let's shift the narrative to celebrate the ongoing potential for growth and learning in older adults.
 
When someone tells you:

“You Look Great for Your Age."
This seemingly complimentary remark is a veiled reinforcement of ageism, implying that aging is undesirable and that value is tied to youthfulness. Instead, offer unambiguous praise like, “You look great,” which appreciates the person without age-related conditions.
  1. “She’s Too Old to Do That.” Such statements severely underestimate older adults and perpetuate outdated ideas of what aging “should” look like. Let's encourage and celebrate the diverse interests and capabilities of older adults, recognizing their right to engage in fulfilling activities at any age.
  2. “Senior Moment.” Describing memory lapses as “senior moments” not only trivializes the issue but also fosters negative stereotypes about cognitive aging. It's crucial to understand that while memory disorders are more common in older adulthood, they are not normal. Mindful language involves not attributing minor forgetfulness to age and recognizing that everyone, irrespective of age, can have moments of distraction.
  3. “Act Your Age.” This phrase often aims to regulate behavior seen as inappropriate for one’s age, reinforcing rigid and outdated norms. In my work on sexual health and aging, I encourage health providers to confront their biases about aging and sexuality. It’s important to support individuals in embracing their authentic selves at every age.
  4. “Old Dogs Can’t Learn New Tricks." This cliché wrongly suggests that older individuals are inherently averse to learning or new experiences. Research shows that resistance to change is less about age and more about individual openness. Let's shift the narrative to celebrate the ongoing potential for growth and learning in older adults.
I am a decent amount older than I look. I get these types of things all the time. It usually happens when someone is talking to me and I pick up on clues that they think I am a good bit younger than I am. I get guesses as much as 10 years younger than I am. I will usually tell people that I am a little older than I look when I pick up on things in a conversation like this. I get a wow, or oh, every time. Then many say they would never have guessed that age. So, I guess I don't get any of these specific statements but I have this thing that happens to me all the time.
 
I’ve never been troubled by someone telling me I look good for my age. I’m happy to be recognized for aging well.

In my experience, a reference to a senior moment is self deprecating with friends. The older we get, the more there is in our brains to sort through. It takes longer to find things in a big library than a little one.

I do agree that age has little to do with what you should do in life. You’re never too old to have new experiences.
 
When I get the clearance from my doctors I am going sky diving. I have been talked out if it twice. I want to and need to go. If I die, I die. Sky diving is actually pretty safe. I want to try hang gliding as well.
Did it once and it was a blast! I must say, I was so glad there was parachutes on that plane, it was being held together with duct tape and vice grips which did not instill confidence in it's airworthiness!!
 
Did it once and it was a blast! I must say, I was so glad there was parachutes on that plane, it was being held together with duct tape and vice grips which did not instill confidence in it's airworthiness!!
I flew a jump plane once. ONCE. I honestly don't blame anyone for wanting to jump out of it. The thought crossed my mind too. Amazing that a piece of junk can get a C of A in this world.
 
I flew a jump plane once. ONCE. I honestly don't blame anyone for wanting to jump out of it. The thought crossed my mind too. Amazing that a piece of junk can get a C of A in this world.
I wonder if inspectors give them more leeway when they are going to be used for parachuting considering that everyone should then be fine! I am sure this is not true, but fun to think about ;~)) I have a friend in Cali who flew for United for 30+ years and now does plane inspections since he "COVID Retired" in 2021. I am going to ask him next time I type at him!!
 
When I get the clearance from my doctors I am going sky diving. I have been talked out if it twice. I want to and need to go. If I die, I die. Sky diving is actually pretty safe. I want to try hang gliding as well.
Something I have always wanted to do. There were a few guys at a place I worked at years ago that started doing it. It was kind of expensive to do back then so I never did it. Another thing I have always wanted to try is hang-gliding.
 
I am at the age whereby if I reverse the numbers I become considerably younger. The actual number is my biological age. The reversed number is how I see myself.
Hmmmm, 64, 46. At least for another 2 1/2 months or so. I like that logic. It starts getting worse from here though. I think I’ll do that just this one time.
 
I'm at one of those ages where it makes no difference if you reverse the numbers.
Of course in my head, I'm still in my 30's. My body tells my mind I'm a total a-hole!:D
Moondog Wily said:
"I wonder if inspectors give them more leeway when they are going to be used for parachuting considering that everyone should then be fine!"
I don't know about that. I rented a plane in Australia (a C172 like I had at home) and I was flabbergasted at the condition of it. Nothing was really suspect as I did my pre-flight walk around, but the condition of the plane inside was rather disconcerting. Gaps in the instrument panel where radios or instruments had been removed and not replaced, wire harnesses hanging down loose and unbundled, outdated (to me) placards... just a general unkempt interior and panel. Nothing like the 182 jump lane that I flew that one and only time though, she would have not gotten in that jump plane with me I'm sure. But the Aussie one still bothered my wife more than it bothered me, she was used to my pristine baby back home. Plane flew well and ran fine, if a bit of a dog compared to mine. I figured if they accepted my commercial credentials and handling of the bird on the check flight; one circuit (pattern for you US flyers, just a simple take off and landing with their chief pilot), I deemed the plane was sound enough and airworthy. But I kept a keen ear for untoward sounds and quirks in the controls. So off we went for a nice tour over Fraser Island and the channel looking for whales, sharks and such. There's a ton of tiger sharks in the wave breaks on the shore of Fraser Island! And besides, not everyone gets to fly a plane on a holiday in Oz haha.
 
I'm a critical thinker.

In case anyone is wondering:

What is critical thinking?

Critical thinking is an objective process of examining and evaluating an issue to form a judgment. It involves questioning, analyzing, and evaluating the facts and figures presented to make judgments based on these and other inputs. Critical thinking requires reasoning and being an active learner rather than a passive recipient of information. Critical thinkers identify, analyze and solve problems systematically rather than by intuition or instinct. It is a crucial process that helps individuals develop a deeper understanding of an issue or situation and make more informed decisions.


Read more here: How To Train Your Brain For Critical Thinking As A Manager


What is analytical thinking?

Analytical thinking breaks down complex issues or concepts into smaller, more digestible pieces. It is a logical process to solve problems in various aspects of life, including science, technology, society, business, and management. Unlike critical thinking, analytical thinking involves focusing on oneself to analyze an issue rather than looking outside of oneself to assess a problem. The core activities of analytical thinking include concentrating on facts and evidence, analyzing data or information, dissecting data/information, reasoning, partitioning and breakdown, eliminating extraneous data, and analyzing trends. With analytical thinking, individuals can approach complex problems logically and well-informedly.

 
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