PRS HXDA 30W Combo

Discussion in 'Amplifiers' started by Em7, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. Boogie

    Boogie SuperD

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    If you don’t keep the speaker amp level at 50% or less, it’s a giant helping of FM!!! :D (Honestly, the nominal rating is 1100W and peak 2000W)
     
  2. ViperDoc

    ViperDoc New Member

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    I can’t believe how relatively inexpensive that rig is. We would probably agree that modelers are subordinate to the real thing in all cases excepting practicality, and that’s why these platforms exist. Sounds pretty good too, but I’d love to hear one of those full range cabs...
     
  3. Steve's addiction

    Steve's addiction New Member

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    Les you are absolutely correct. It's a late 70's model with ss pre and tube power amp. Here's another reason to listen to les, he knows his stuff.
     
    LSchefman likes this.
  4. 11top

    11top Cousin Eddie's cousin

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    Yep. They are loud, and sound good. Boogie bought one too, and he seems to really like it with his Kemper. Nobody seems to be able to keep them in stock.
     
    #44 11top, Jul 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    It’s different with a solid state amplifier for a modeler; the wattage gives you clean headroom. The idea is the modeler is creating all the sound you want, and a clean speaker that stays clean is needed to reproduce what the modeler is putting out.

    My studio monitors are almost 500 Watts each. Similar concept.

    Doesn’t mean I play them loud; just means they have gobs of headroom.
     
  6. DreamTheaterRules

    DreamTheaterRules Archon owning member

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    Ok, I haven’t spent much time lately in the TGP Digital and Modeling section, but I hadn’t heard of these monitors and that’s way cheaper than the usual “good” suspects for FRFR, like QSC K.2 and Yamaha DXR. In fact, half or less!
     
  7. 11top

    11top Cousin Eddie's cousin

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    And why they aren’t sitting on any vendor’s shelf. “On back order” until August is what I’m finding. My 2nd one is ordered and due then.
     
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  8. Boogie

    Boogie SuperD

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    I had been eyeing the Yamaha DXR10/12s for the past few months as the beginning of a small band PA/monitor/Kemper monitor candidate. Dave Matthews - here on the forums, not the non-PRS toting touring artist - has one and has had nothing but high praise, but they're $500 each. The matching sub is way more. The Alto (who make the HeadRush private labeled models) TS312 is $299 MAP and the 12” matching sub is $399. Yes, this is a budget solution, but it sounds really good. And if you’re smart about limiting the bass response, you shouldn’t blow a driver. Match a few of these with a digital mixer and I have a fully functional live rig for the band...and me.
     
    bodia likes this.
  9. jxe

    jxe babe en der wood

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    the hell is an hxda thread all about modeling pedalboards? mods please close.
     
    LSchefman likes this.
  10. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Remember seeing Hare Krishna proselytizers in yellow sheets handing out pamphlets at the airport? This is the guitar version of that.

    They’re gonna show up at that damn airport regardless of whether they were invited to attend!

    Just avoid engaging with them and you’ll be OK. ;)
     
    #50 LSchefman, Jul 9, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
  11. Em7

    Em7 deus ex machina

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    That is because both amps are derived from the 5F6A Tweed Bassman. All of the Tweed amps react to changes in guitar volume this way. It is because they all have relatively short signal paths where the midrange is not strangled. A short signal path allows more of a guitar's individual characteristics to shine through. Fender posted a video that demonstrates the beauty of the Tweed circuits. All four amps have relatively simple circuits by today's standards. None of these amps have a signal loading non-buffered tone stack. There is nothing cluttering tone. The problem with high gain amps is that all of that compression and overdrive leads to a situation where guitars lose their individuality. A guitar is merely an input device.



    Another interesting thing is that Joe Bonamassa decided to switch from his Marshall-Dumble setup to an all Tweed setup and do away with his pedals.

     
    #51 Em7, Jul 10, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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  12. Em7

    Em7 deus ex machina

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    As Les mentioned, the difference has more to do with design goal than technology employed. The Music Man amps were designed for a big, punchy, clean sound. If you want to compare solid-state to tube head-to-head, compare a Mark II Boogie with a Trademark 60. I have used both amps, and the Trademark does a remarkable job of capturing the Boogie tone and feel (It can cop other amp tones as well), and it can easily do it at 65dB, which is the sound pressure level of a normal conversation at three feet.
     
  13. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Interesting explanation, and I completely agree with your description of the resulting tone; obviously I don’t have the technical background to fully explain why. I definitely find that higher gain amps do indeed cause the guitars to all sound very much alike! Not that it’s necessarily a bad thing, just that all those gain stages do stuff to the signal one may, or may not, want. Simple is good.

    In addition to the PRS single-channel amps I rely on, I’ve also got a Mesa Lone Star. One feature of that amp is that one can switch out the effects loop, boost circuit, and global master volume (all with a single switch). Switching that stuff out is plainly audible. It lifts a veil, though compared to the PRS amps, there’s still not the same clarity. It’s a nice amp, but I can hear a big difference in openness and detail. My guitars certainly sound more individual with a single channel PRS amp.

    Incidentally, my son tours with one of those tweed Champs in parallel with his Lone Star (one reason I got the LS was so he’d have a familiar amp to play when he’s in town). That little thing is hand wired and sounds good! He has a relationship with Fender, and likes to use their stuff. He cut his last record with a ‘63 Vibrolux, cranked.
     

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