PRS DGT vs. Suhr Standard Pro Strat

biblebound

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Ok, I know these are basically two different guitars with different pup configurations (yet, I would probably opt for a HSS config in the Suhr and I hear the DGT has unreal split tones), but these are the two guitars I am gas'n for at the moment. I figure one of these guitars might cure my electric gas (famous last words, I know, I know ;)). I already have a PRS Mira, a Duesenberg CC, and a Tele. I love all three, but the Mira I could perhaps part with if one of these gits could replace it. The Tele and the Doozy are definitely keepers. Even though I only have one guitar with single coils, I prefer a single-coil tone as I often use split tones on both my humbucker equipped electrics. I exclusively play gospel music, usually with more of a R&B feel.

I live in a very rural area and would have to travel hundreds of miles, perhaps even farther, to get my hands on a Suhr or PRS DGT. Over the years, most of my guitar purchases are made via the internet after making the most informed and educated choice; thus, the above inquiry.

So, anyone have any first-hand experience with these two guitars?
 

Ovibos

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One thing to keep in mind when comparing those is that the DGT frets are pretty big. I have similar on my SE Holcomb and I'm learning how not to sharp things with lighter pressure.
 

LSchefman

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A lot more is different between these two guitars than the pickups.

Suhr's guitars are essentially custom Fender style instruments, some in the classic style, some more modern. But they're Fenders when taken to their essence.

The DGT is in no way a Fender style guitar, even though the coils can be split. Its lineage is traceable to the McCarty Trem, a model based on the McCarty, named in honor of Ted McCarty, who was Gibson's president during its Golden Era of the 50s and 60s, the guy who developed the Les Paul, the Explorer, the Flying V, the SG, the 335...and shared a lot of guitarmaking info with Paul Smith.

Despite the influence, the DGT is not essentially a fancy Gibson. It's more of a synthesis of Paul's ideas, influenced by McCarty (and this is just my opinion, YMMV and all that).

That isn't to say the DGT can't do some nice single coil tones, it surely can. But if you listen to David Grissom's recordings, you can get a very good idea of what the guitar was designed to do, from the man who spec'd the instrument.

The fundamental question is what the guitar is designed to do, and how that meshes with your tastes and needs as a player. Forget the rest of the interesting stuff about each guitar; what is it you need?
 

biblebound

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The fundamental question is what the guitar is designed to do, and how that meshes with your tastes and needs as a player. Forget the rest of the interesting stuff about each guitar; what is it you need?

First, I'm interested in these two models because:

1. They are well-made, quality instruments built by reputable luthiers.
2. They are widely applauded for their versatility.
3. I am, among other things, attracted to the DGT because I own a Mira, which is the most comfortable guitar in my stable. I really like it (if I'm not mistaken, a similar scale length as the DGT). I also appreciate the split tones of the Mira. I assume the playablity and variance of tones would be, at the very least, comparable.
4. As far as the Suhr, I tend to gravitate towards single-coils, but like the idea of a humbucker in the bridge.
5. I know I might find these qualities in less expensive choices, but I just LIKE these two ;).

So yea, I realize they are completely different, but based on reviews and even listening to samples, it appears the DGT, with it's split tones, could perhaps venture into acceptable singlecoil Strat territory and the Suhr, with it's humbucker in the bridge, could perhaps satisfy my very limited humbucker needs.

You know, it's GAS;.it doesn't always make much sense. I suppose I'm hoping owners of these models will post on this thread promoting the virtues of their respected guitars.
 
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Huggy B

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Well, I would say you already know how a Suhr might feel if you played a strat type guitar, simply a high quality version of that. I think there one of the best at that type of instrument and I see a lot of fusion shredders playing them like Guthrie Govan. The DGT is essentially a core PRS 24 fret with that artists specs, you already know what split coils sound like, so in my mind it's a feel thing and you might not have to travel hundreds of miles to try a core PRS 24 fret.

The other thing to think about is what niche you want to fill in your arsenal of guitars. Your tele is a bolt on, your other instrument is a unique semi hollow, what other weapon to you want? Another bolt on? Or another instrument altogether that will do split coil and other sounds on the Les Paul side? Food for thought.
 

LSchefman

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The DGT is essentially a core PRS 24 fret with that artists specs, you already know what split coils sound like, so in my mind it's a feel thing and you might not have to travel hundreds of miles to try a core PRS 24 fret.

Actually, the DGT is a 22 fret guitar, not a 24 fret. That makes the neck a little stiffer, and it also affects the tone, and the position of the bridge pickup, which, in turn, affects the tone.

So the OP's Mira, for example, will not sound like the DGT, it'll sound different (of course, the pickups mounted on the pick guard, the different materials choices, etc., will also matter).

But the Suhrs are mainly 22 fret guitars, too, only with pickguard mounted pickups, different body materials, different neck materials, different fretboard materials (on some), and many other differences, will sound like completely different guitars.

I'm not going to promote the relative virtues of the guitars, simply because they're so darn different. I could tell you how great apples taste compared to oranges, but that only means I prefer apples to oranges. You might prefer oranges to apples.

If you're going to drop what many consider serious coin on a guitar, I think you owe it to yourself to play both, and come to a decision based on your own tastes and needs.

Who cares what a bunch of strangers on the internet say to feed your GAS? Different instruments speak to different people.

If you like the sound and tones Grissom gets with his DGT, well, there's your answer on what they are capable of. If, on the other hand, listening to Pete Thorn play his Suhrs seems much more in your direction, that's what you should explore.

If you can't decide based on the tones, and you want to see how they respond in YOUR hands, it's time for that hundreds of miles trip. Get in your car, burn some gasoline, and come to a decision.

"Gee, I like that pair of shoes. They look nice. Should I buy that pair or this other pair I'm looking at?"

"Have you tried them on? Which one fits your feet better?"

"I'm not willing to try them on. I just want to order a pair of shoes because I have shoe GAS."

"Ummm...OK...."
 

biblebound

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Who cares what a bunch of strangers on the internet say to feed your GAS? Different instruments speak to different people. If you like the sound and tones Grissom gets with his DGT, well, there's your answer on what they are capable of. If, on the other hand, listening to Pete Thorn play his Suhrs seems much more in your direction, that's what you should explore.

If you can't decide based on the tones, and you want to see how they respond in YOUR hands, it's time for that hundreds of miles trip. Get in your car, burn some gasoline, and come to a decision.

"Gee, I like that pair of shoes. They look nice. Should I buy that pair or this other pair I'm looking at?"

"Have you tried them on? Which one fits your feet better?"

"I'm not willing to try them on. I just want to order a pair of shoes because I have shoe GAS." "Ummm...OK...."

Wise counsel. I'm hearing you....
 

guitarman001

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Years ago I purchased a Cu24 over a pro s4. It was the right decision. I now have a pro s4, too. Totally amazing. I'd say more character per pickup position. But PRS cuts through in the band better. The suhr is thinner sounding. They're all great guitars, you can't go wrong. DGT sounds great but the feel wasn't for me.
 

PLuan

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All good guitars. If you buy just because GAS, then buy both of them. They are all good.
If you plan to play them, ask yourself you are a strat player or McCarty/LP player. Ergonomically they are quite different. For myself, a DGT is nice but I grew up playing strat. With a strat I can switch pickups, do volume/tone sweep in total darkness. I build my playing style, techniques around it. I know I am 100% with that. But DGT, the lack of confidence might screw up a song. Some people might be a McCarty guy who never adapted to a strat.
 

Boogie

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Personally, as an ardent DGT player considering a similarly complimentary guitar for a while, I can easily add: the two guitars are definitively different tools. There's plenty of room in anyone's stable for both. Each one is very versatile for different reasons, and if it's important to you, can be completely sonically different. With model and pickup selection, however, you can also get enough similarity where you wouldn't have to change amp/rig settings if you switched back and forth during a show. I don't see the two guitars as competing at all.
 
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itstooloudMike

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When I had my DGT, I also had a Suhr Classic-S at the same time. Both were wonderful instruments, but very different. I only used the DGT for humbucker sounds, because it did those well. And the Suhr (which was SSS) had the single coil thing to perfection. I compared them often, each having different strengths. And the thought often crossed my mind, "what if I had to choose only one". For me, that was a pretty easy choice. Partially because I'm a Strat guy at heart, and there isn't any kind of music I can't make with a good Strat. But aside from that, the playing experience with the Suhr was really just extraordinary. I loved the Suhr neck (even-C medium, with compound radius). And Suhr fret-work is second to none. For me, the Suhr really was so good that it allowed me to play better than my ability. I know that sounds goofy, but it was reality for me. I could play things faster, more accurately, and more cleanly with the Suhr. I've owned two Suhr guitars, and both were awesome. I no longer have a Suhr or a DGT. My only PRS is my '93 CE-24, which I dearly love. Personally, while I enjoyed owning and playing the DGT, I would probably not buy another. But I would have no hesitation to buy another Suhr. And again, that may be biased because I am really a Strat guy at heart. I've never played a better Strat-type than a Suhr.
 
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