prs all the way?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Archie090612, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. jcha008

    jcha008 New Member

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    PRS is my favorite brand by far, not even a question. But I'm too much of a slut to be 100%, I love guitars from just about every brand. My lot so far is mostly PRS, but I do have a couple Les Paul's, Jackson and Vik. They all get played, but no doubt less than the PRSi.
     
  2. Lee B.

    Lee B. I stitch my wings and pull the strings.

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    I used to be mainly a Fender player, had three of them over the years interspersed with Yamaha and Jackson superstrats. Both my current electrics are PRS, and all three instruments I plan to eventually add to my herd are PRS also. I love the comfortable neck shapes, the 25" scale, and vintage feeling radius that chord shapes just flow out of. The tuning and intonation are rock solid, even on the 1990 EG model I have with 27 years of play wear. They are such good instruments that I often get distracted at work thinking about playing them.
     
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  3. Rider1260

    Rider1260 New Member

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    99.9% PRS
    I have one Strat that my Dad painted for me that I can never sell but it is now mainly wall art
     
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  4. markd21

    markd21 New Member

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    Live and, 95% of the time, in the studio it's PRS. I made the switch about a year ago, and haven't really looked back - except to get another Gretsch Duo Jet. That's my 5%-er in the studio. While I thinned the herd a bit, I am always looking for the next "must have", lol. Right now I am eyeballing a Gold Top 408......
     
  5. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    I don't understand the need to ask the question. Yes my PRSi are better made, better playing, and except for when I need a big bottom end or some serious quack, better sounding. But that doesn't mean I should only have PRSi in the stable. I enjoy my Strats and my Heritage LP's and don't feel the need to sell them. They don't get played as much as my PRSi, but when I do play them I enjoy fighting the Strat and hefting that heavy LP. It is what I expect to have to do and I'm not disappointed. And I do think they have a sound the PRSi do not. Besides, if you never taste the bitter, you cannot appreciate the sweet.
     
  6. Herr Squid

    Herr Squid I was severely impressed

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    Not 100%, don't think I ever will be. Love me my PRSi, but I do have a couple of F-style solidbody electrics, a couple double-locking superstrats, some acoustics of other brands.
     
  7. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Curiosity is a good enough reason to ask, right?

    Any search for the holy grail is a fool's errand. But sometimes folks discover that one particular instrument maker's instruments best match up with what they like.
     
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  8. matonanjin

    matonanjin New Member

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    I have a PRS, Strat, Les Paul, Gibson 325 and a few others. I haven't picked up the LP in months; it is just too heavy. Probably haven't played the Strat in weeks. But because I have a TSA compliant hard case for it, the Strat, I grab it whenever I travel or go for a lesson. But I am falling in love all over again with my Gibson 325. I don't really know why. Probably my PRS gets played 62.7 % of the time and my 325 37.3% of the time.
     
  9. ReptilianNosewood

    ReptilianNosewood New Member

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    PRS and Strats. I had an olllld Les Paul i was in the middle of refinishing and i decided i didnt want it so i gave it to a friend. My next one may be a Skervesen, or an Ormsby. I need a high quality 7 and PRS does not make one for less than the price of a car.
     
  10. drawshot

    drawshot Just one more...and that's it!

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    This...precisely.

    I toyed around with others...but always pull my head out and realize my PRS toys outshine the rest.

    No way I can swing a PS acoustic, though...so I've put my faith in Taylor. I have 3, and love em.
     
  11. Archie090612

    Archie090612 New Member

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    I play my custom 24 most of the time I have a custom shop les Paul and a gretsch falcon I barely touch and there beautiful i sometimes contemplate selling them and using the money for other hobbies but I think I will regret it when I'm older in my settling down years lol
     
  12. walrus

    walrus New Member

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    Since I only have one acoustic and one electric, yes, PRS all the time for electric!

    walrus
     
  13. garrett

    garrett Not a New Member

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    I was fortunate enough to get interested in PRS guitars early in my guitar playing journey. Haven't owned a single Gibson and don't expect I ever will. I've had three Strats and two Teles, a couple of those were actual Fenders and the others were parts builds. I still have one Strat that I'm keeping for an E flat guitar or for when I really want *that* sound.
     
  14. goat-n-gitter

    goat-n-gitter Dismembered

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    It's like boxes of crayons - most of the time (particularly with my band) my PRS do all I need, like the trusty 16 color box. But sometimes (particularly for recording) you want the subtle shades like maize or raw umber, so the 64 color box is nice to have. I sold off several of my non-PRS electrics, but I still keep some of the others for variety.
     
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  15. Callan

    Callan New Member

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    My Les Paul recently became my project guitar. New nut, new pickups, new TRC. I might also put new electrics in with coil splits soon
    For my main band I'm 100% PRS, but I might bring something different jamming with friends.
    I haven't played my strat live in many years, it feels a bit awkward to play these days.
    My explorer has sat idle for even longer. I think it's time to sell that one.
     
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  16. GuitarDrummer

    GuitarDrummer Always learning more...

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    Not there yet. I can say that my PRS has taken a lot of attention, and has put other guitars on my "hit list" for sale or trade in. I'm relatively new to PRS, and I can easily say that my first PRS purchase is about as kick-ass as possible.

    I suspect that my "hit list" will grow over time, my collection will shrink, and every 2-3 guitars that ends up on the chopping block may very well get replaced with a PRS.
     
  17. starscream67

    starscream67 New Member

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    I came to PRS from the Gibson/Epiphone camp. In 1997 I got a Gibson Les Paul Studio - it was a very expensive piece of crap - I didn't know anything about guitars back then, but the nut was borked from day 1 and eventually had to be replaced. I got my first PRSi Custom 22 in 2006 and a Singlecut in 2011. In 2012 I ordered an Epiphone Les Paul and it arrived with the headstock broken off. I think that experience originally triggered my "don't buy anything but PRS" mentality.

    However, at the end of last year I really wanted to buy a new PRSi and despite the massive choice in the SE line up, I didn't like ANY of the options. So I ended up getting a Schecter KM-6 (which I do really like but despite my best efforts to setup correctly, still has far more fret buzz at a higher action than my PRSi's).

    So yeah, learnt my lesson. Will never buy anything but PRS again and super excited to see what 2018 brings us...
     
  18. Deli6505

    Deli6505 Rockin' the D!

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    Aside from my DGT and Tremonti SE (first gen), I also have a 2004 Les Paul Studio Platinum, Fender Stratocaster, Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR and a Squier Telecaster that my uncle gave me. Primarily for my band (which is metal), I mainly just use my Tremonti SE and Schecter because the DGT really isn't setup for metal (despite the \m/ pickup in the bridge), my beloved Les Paul is semi-retired for recording only and my Strat and Tele need some major repairs. But at home and for my other musical project, the DGT gets the most play time these days. I aim to add a Core-Tremonti or Singlecut to the mix hopefully before next year's end.
     
  19. alantig

    alantig Santana-free since '63!

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    An Explorer is one of the few models I've long wanted and never owned.
     
  20. crocker

    crocker New Member

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    Vela gets 95% of the play time, SC58 gets 4%.
    Fender Strat 50s classic series gets the last 1%. Just can't quit that one.
     

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