Our we addicted to guitar, or do we just like it?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Clashcityrocker, Feb 22, 2020.

  1. Black Plaid

    Black Plaid just another Alan

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    I don't know if it's an addiction, but it certainly fulfills a need.

    When I started, I lived and breathed guitar playing. From 16 up until about 26 when I started getting into software professionally. Even then I never event considered selling off my PRS or amps.

    Didn't really put any focus on playing though, was extremely busy keeping up with tech. Even landed a job writing music software and didn't make me want to go all in on guitar again.

    Until recently. Not sure what happened. Maybe it was finding this forum. Ya'll are a terrible bunch of enablers! I even started taking lessons to fill in the gaps.

    Or maybe it was the vintage guitar shop with the occasional PRS that's gotten me into it again. (BTW they have a certain braz neck PS in there right now if anyone wants a good deal, I can help. :D)

    If it is an addiction, I suppose there are worse ones.
     
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  2. Herr Squid

    Herr Squid I was severely impressed

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    Gosh there's a lot of words in this thread. For me, it's very simple.

    I heard electric guitar and loved the noise it made. I learned to play so I could make that noise. I love making that noise.

    I wouldn't die without it, so I'm pretty sure I'm not addicted. But if I couldn't do it anymore, I'd be very sad.
     
  3. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    \
    Might have just been that crew, I dunno. Possibly because they didn’t have a chance to practice over and over like a quartet does?

    There was indeed a click. I dunno. I never went into another session like that without an orchestrator and someone who could conduct.
     
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  4. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    It’s good to know you agree with me. ;)
     
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  5. Herr Squid

    Herr Squid I was severely impressed

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    OK, more words in this post!

    You ran into a massive cultural difference on that one. The skill sets and whole approach to rehearsal and performance are totally different.

    I played in school concert and jazz bands, which I think is pretty much the same gig: Conductor hands you sheet music, says "learn this." You go practice to that sheet music to get your individual parts down, then in week after week of rehearsals, you build the individuals all playing their parts into an ensemble piece of music. Then you perform that piece in one or more concerts. Then you're done. The cycle repeats.

    A few points:

    The parts are far more complicated than pop/rock/blues forms. Most players never memorize the parts.

    There is little or no idiom to fall back on and in fact probably none of those players can improvise or even play without sheet music in front of them.

    The flip side of that is that many of them were probably amazing at sight reading the parts you put in front of them.

    So those orchestral players were probably completely at sea in the situation they were first put in, but once they had somebody directing them they would be back in familiar territory. The fact that they did get it in just a couple of takes means that they were pros.

    I played piano and woodwind instruments up through school, and was drum major of my high school marching band, so I'm familiar with conducting a little bit. I started playing guitar in early high school, and when I did, I had no idea whatsoever how to play an instrument without sheet music in front of me. I was determined to learn to play guitar by ear, and I have kind of succeeded at that. But learning to play spontaneously has been a lifelong journey (I'm in my early 50s now) and jamming is still very difficult and foreign for me, even inside the cliched I-IV-V blooz format.

     
  6. danktat

    danktat Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist

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    This is my warm up / tune up song. It was the first song I was ever taught (ironically in a half way house when I was fresh out of jail and rehab). And to this day , I still use it to tune my guitar.
     
  7. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Open - Eared

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    Perhaps what we learn is that the guitars we own, the boxes of music gear we have stashed away, the infrequently used, the piles of junk we have, the disorganized places we keep stuff in, this is all part of the addiction.

    We need not remind ourselves that lack of organizational skills and self-control does not bode well for people. Please remember that being out of control is essentially the same as being highly disorganized, in thought, word and deed. As a result, what occurs is the mindset of GIGO. Garbage in, garbage out. You'll likely forget what occurred this evening, because of GIGO.

    A solution, at least for the interim, for many of us, is to spend some time with your storage spaces and organize them, whether that be your indoor storage area, your garage, your attic, or your shed. The benefits might be that you won't have so much junk lying around in places that aren't readily accessed. It might make it easier for both yourself and family to locate such items when they're needed, instead of trying to dig through piles of cardboard boxes or storage bins that don't have labels on them.

    Case in point: My dinky apartment has several places for storage, some racks, a dedicated storage room, and various shelving units. The storage area is almost the worst culprit, because my least used "junk" resides there. Part of my spring cleaning activities this year is to schedule a time when it may be possible to itemize and document what's there, then store things away in an organized fashion so these will be more easily accessed when needed.

    Got junk? We all do. Where's yours? Kept away so only you know where things are? Or the attic crawlspace, the land of misfit toys, unused gear, old clothes, garden tools and whatevertheheckyou'vegot already. Yes folks, we're not stupid or uneducated, we're just disorganized (tonight) and need to find a place to keep our junk so we know where the stuff is.
     
  8. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Open - Eared

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    Kudos for remaining clean during/following rehab. Try your hand at Harvest Moon, I think you'll appreciate the sentiments and theme better when compared to Needle. For many of us locals, it's a subtle reminder about Needle, without bringing it up conversation...which can be a conversation-stopper for some, because they don't know what to say next, rather than one that encourages discussion...
     
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  9. danktat

    danktat Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist

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    I wouldn't necessarily say "clean" as I do drink and I have a "medicinal" card. But I haven't done what I would call hard drugs since my late teens. I wasn't a needle user but I loved to smoke. Whatever drug it was, if I "could" smoke it, I "did" smoke it.

    But there was a guy there, in the half way house, that brought his guitar with him. He saw I was interested, and showed me my first D chord. So, I guess, in essence, he taught me to play guitar. He was all about The Eagles, CSNY, Beatles, etc............So the songs he would teach me were those kinds of songs. The arpeggiated chords would allow me to hear which string was out of tune, so I kept using that song as my warm up/tune up song.
     
  10. Clashcityrocker

    Clashcityrocker RedPilled

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    I would say I love to play guitar. I love to learn about gear and buy new gear. I am a songwriter so I can't say I love that because most of the time it's like as Goo Goo Dolls singer John Rzeznik once said "songwriting is like finding a diamond and then dropping it in an outhouse and trying to get it out of there." It's the hardest thing you can do in music. Writing a song that everyone will like as well as writing a whole album that everyone will like.
     
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  11. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Open - Eared

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    Well,

    Thanks for remaining free from the hardcore drugs...too many times good people who experience loss or pain self-medicate with recreational drugs, only to feel a need for something that will dull their pain and senses even more. (Please forgive the lecture, I only dabbled with pot years ago myself and contracted health problems resulting from that; years I wished I could have back again, but to no avail.)

    So to some extent, like you, I can say I'd been there...going into rehab and halfway houses for a while...no prison time, thankfully, but it's been a long climb out of darkness until seeing a better hope for the future...

    And yes, practicing guitar has been a significant way one can express their feelings via a safe avenue. Too often we see people on the news acting out their frustrations and anger...music may be only a connective way a person can express his feelings without browbeating a listener into submission...perhaps this is why there are so many genres of music, some of which are more tinged with angst than others...and why IMHO it's good to seek a calming inner peace that will help guard you against experiencing pain or suffering...some use yoga or meditation...others know when to shut off the chaotic, hectic way in which we receive our daily dose of information...

    My advice to you is that if ever you feel the need to self-medicate, ask yourself, "Why am I doing this? What causes me to reach for the drugs?" Perhaps this won't help you do away with the drugs altogether, but it may put you on the path towards an even better recovery in time. The reason I can say this is the last time I smoked pot was in 1993, and currently only drink a half-glass of wine, or 2 beers maximum. (My younger days was fraught with learning life's lessons the hard way, when I wished to be taken seriously and others thought I was joking...)

    My feeling was to recognize my limit and not overdo things (overdoing things is what causes the problem in many areas of life; learn from this and you'll know when to walk away from things in good health) :)
     
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  12. Parralax view

    Parralax view New Member

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    My dad should have been horsewhipped. He got me addicted to this drug when I was 8yrs. old. ;-) As long as I have been at it, I love it, I hate it, and I can't really do without it.
     
  13. Boogie

    Boogie Zombie Two, DFZ

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    Similar situation for me, too. I played in symphonic bands, wind ensembles, jazz bands, pit bands, heck, everything I could from 6th grade to junior year in college. There was no such thing as ‘memorization’. And there was no band without a conductor. No sir, it just can’t happen. But could I comprehend improv? Nope. And after 3 private teachers and several years, I gave up. That’s when I picked up a guitar. But this time I would refuse to read music for this instrument and resort to playing by ear exclusively. I felt liberated. At one point, I thought I could play anything on my instrument and was extremely confident sight reading most things put in front of me. But playing a Kansas (Livgren) tune after playing to the album a few times was the biggest rush I’d experienced. There’s endorphins involved in this feeling, so it could be an addiction.
     
  14. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Open - Eared

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    Not by comparison, but by contrast: My musical training began in 4th grade with the saxophone, but stopped several weeks later when my grade school music teacher asked why I couldn't play what was being taught: lack of motivation, fear of disturbing my family at home, and no practice. Well. The teacher then asked if I felt suited to the instrument any further, and my answer was a meek, "No, m'am."

    Within 10 days, my sax rental contract was cleared, though the deposit and previous 4 weeks rental fee was collected, and the sax returned to the rental company.

    Several years later, my grandparents allowed me to rummage up in their house attic, and that's when my Dad's old Sears Roebuck-ordered steel string parlor guitar was found. The guitar had languished for decades in both freezing cold and summer heat in a moldy old chipboard case. The guitar was bellied and the neck bowed, and I was able to eke out a poor rendition of "Secret Agent Man" as my first attempt at playing. As bad condition as the guitar was in, it was the impetus (read: motivation) that inspired me to begin my decades-old tone quest journey myself.

    Some lessons along the way helped in the late '90's, and many an afternoon in the mid to late 1990's was spent glued to my CD player and stereo, copping licks and learning how to play at a level I was modestly happy with. Although my ear training was never note-for-note because of the limited CD player technology then, this was the next step towards playing as an accompanist. In time (past the year 2000 mark) I learned how to play as a rhythm guitarist to better players at local blues jams. My lead playing was, and is still a work in progress, and there are many stories I could tell, but will refrain from because they do not pertain to my growth as a guitarist.

    As time wore on, from about 2006 until 2014, my Thursday evenings until 1:30 AM were part of the local open-mic jazz/blues jam in town. Ever aware of thinking that the best gear would produce the best tone, my spending habits followed suit and for several years I owned a string of Private Stocks that were bought and sold as my musical tastes changed over time.

    Once the open-mic folded because of the host guitarist's retirement due to health reasons, my mindset was to simplify what I owned to match my skill level...my PS guitars and fancy boutique amps eventually were downsized as my finances required. My lavish lifestyle could not be supported on my meager income, and although my finances are modestly stable at this time, they will never be what they were in the 90's-00's.

    I think the addiction we might all feel drawn into is, to buy the best gear you can possibly afford and employ that without reservation to make the best music possible. The reality is that if the cash cow dries up, so do your options for buying top-quality gear. Smarter and wiser now, I "make do" with 2 PRS S2 SC guitars, and one A60E.

    You might ask, what held me back from selling everything and giving up? The answer comes from within: We all desire to make a good name for ourselves in any way we can, whether it be by doing good things for others, treating people decently, working hard at our jobs, putting up with the undesirable aspects of our lives. Sometimes we get frustrated at what the world dishes out and we don't GAF as much as we used to. In my mind, that IS giving up, and letting the bad guys win. My strong feeling is that we continue to endure whatever posturing or game-playing the world counters with, and realize that the world we view on TV and the internet is opinionated and presents its own spin of things. What we view as TV entertainment is fictional accounts designed to thrill us and make us laugh.

    The addiction for me is not guitars, but trying to rid myself of my attachment to TV and falsehoods that are presented as facts, when indeed they are just someone else's own opinion, viewpoint or manner of storytelling. And perhaps that is what keeps us woefully hooked to TV and the internet: the thirst and hunger for knowledge, because we were given the gift of curiosity and wishing to know what we don't already know. Perhaps that is why mysteries are so popular these days. I personally tend to think of things as nothing more than giving someone a PBJ sandwich and a cup of coffee and letting them express their thanks for that.

    If someone gives you something, you thank them, yes? Remind me to feed you folks virtual lunch more often with a cup of coffee, it'll keep you happier than my not feeding you. ;)
     
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  15. dmatthews

    dmatthews Dave's not here...

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    One day at 13 years old I found an old and beautiful banjo in my dad's closet. It really was a peach of an instrument.
    I pulled it out and remembered the "my dog has fleas" tuning.
    After mucking with it for a couple of hours it hit me...
    I went to my dad and asked him if we could trade it for an acoustic, and he said Heck ya!
    I received a beautiful Hofner acoustic in exchange. I really wish I still had that guitar, but that's another story.
    I've been in bands as a drummer, and it wasn't until about 1999 that I joined a band as a guitar player.
    I've taught myself both instruments, and it likely shows but yes...
    I am addicted.
     
  16. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Yes, I am a dick
     
  17. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Open - Eared

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    How many medals have you won? ;)
     
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  18. dmatthews

    dmatthews Dave's not here...

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    Last name Ted?
     
  19. Alnus Rubra

    Alnus Rubra Loving nature’s wonders

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    I was about 10. My Dad had an old red Hofner Verithin (poor man’s ES335), that he owned since he was in his early 20’s. It featured in the film - St Trinians Great Train Robbery, that he wrote some music for and appeared in briefly.

    I would pick it up and mime, wishing I could play like Louie Shelton, on the Seals and Croft’s album that I’d love to listen to. Man I still love the guitar work he did on that album.

    He sold that guitar to fund the purchase of another. Shame, because it had some family history.

    So began my guitar journey......
     
  20. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Cool story!
     
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