New to PRS - McCarty 594 or Custom22

Discussion in 'Electric Instruments' started by DelMarDude, Feb 23, 2019.

  1. DelMarDude

    DelMarDude New Member

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    I did a search for this topic and oddly didn’t see it. Really looking at a Custom 22 or McCarty 594. I love them both, and probably will have both at some point. I mostly hear “classic rock” in my head - Boston, 38 Special, Stones, etc. I do like to toss in some jazz, blues and other stuff here and there. I am so torn which to start with. I have a couple of Custom Shop Fenders (‘60 Strat and ‘63 Tele). I was searching for Les Paul until I found PRS. I am very impressed with the quality and performance. I guess my question to experienced PRS’rs would be: what would one give me the other wouldn’t. I do see the 594 can provide more of that “special tone” reminiscent of a vintage LP. And from the classic rock point of view... seems an easy choice. They are both versatile and you aren’t stuck in a box. What would you say for a classic rocker who occasionally likes to toss in some jazz, blues, maybe a little Foo Fighters (about as heavy as I get) & even a little smooth jazz. I just see so many Custom 22/24 folks so passionate about them.
     
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  2. beckstriad

    beckstriad New Member

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    If those are the tones for which you're primarily going, it sounds like a 594 or DGT are more your speed. The DGT recommendation comes from reading reviews, not from first experience. I have two 594 type guitars, and they will easily do what you're asking here. The Custom 22 is a great guitar, but if you were thinking closer to LP, that's the 594.
     
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  3. Michael D. Carter

    Michael D. Carter New Member

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    My 594 McCarty's are far better made versions of Les Paul's I've owned, but with many significant design changes that make the guitar stay in tune, make string changes easier and just make it easier to live with. For me it's like comparing my Camaro I use to own with my Panamera I drive now. Both kinda do the same thing. Both can do it at the average to above average level. One of the two make is easier, is much better engineered and a hell of a lot more fun.
     
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  4. Rusty Chos

    Rusty Chos Don’t mean a thang if it don’t twang

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    McCarty 594 can definitely get LP sound, and the control layout is familiar to me.

    I have an older SC 58 stripped that is 24.5” scale and feels wunnerful. I sold my CS LP over that one.
     
    #4 Rusty Chos, Feb 23, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2019
  5. danktat

    danktat Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist

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    I'm a custom 22 guy myself, but you can't go wrong either way. The feel of the thinner body on the 22 is part of what I dig. I am 5'5" with a bit of a gut and that 22 snuggles right in there quite nicely. You might want to play both before making a choice, sometimes, the tone is closer than you think unless you are a/b comparing them side by side. But that feel....well, just a little bit of wood makes a good amount of difference sometimes. JMO. What ever you decide, just remember....I didn't happen without pix!
     
  6. pauloqs

    pauloqs PRS McCarty

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    For what you’re describing, 594 by a mile. That or a regular McCarty. Both will get you there, though the 594 will be closer to the vintage LP tone. But both have the vintage vibe to their tone. The Custom 22 is an amazing guitar and it deserves every ounce of love that it gets. Just from what you’re describing, I think it’s worth starting with one of the McCarty’s, be it the regular (the OG), a 594 double cut, or a 594 singlecut.
     
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  7. Callan

    Callan hack guitarist..

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    I generally take 2 guitars to every gig, sometimes they will be tuned different, but often they are tuned the same and I play both during the night, knowing I always have a backup.
    My go-to pair (at the moment) are my CU22 and SC594. They are both great and cover much of the ground you mentioned.
    In a live situation there isn't a great deal in it - at least to my ear and needs. (my Cu22 has 58/15 and 594 has 58/15 LT pickups - older CU22's might be more varied)
    The CU22 would be a tad more familiar to your fenders with the blade switch and the 594 would be something quite new - new positions to explore, new possibilities with the 4 knobs and individual pickup splits.
    The neck's are different too and this is such a personal preference - you need to get them in your hands.

    tl/dr : both are awesome, play both and take home the one that speaks to you, then sell off the fenders and buy the other PRS. Live happily ever after.
     
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  8. Mozzi

    Mozzi https://imgur.com/user/BAMozzy

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    For the more classic vibe, go for the McCarty 594 but if you want a more modern twist, look at the Custom 22.

    It also depends on whether you want a trem or not, whether you want a Les Paul style layout with independent volume/tone controls and coil splitting or the more scaled back single tone/volume and just a 5 way blade but do get the trem. Obviously there is a 'small' difference in scale length, 24.594" vs 25"and different neck carve as the 594 is the only model with Pattern Vintage.

    Really it does depend on whether you want a more classic 22 fret Guitar or one with a more modern twist - Both superb instruments so what ever you choose will be an excellent, high quality instrument - it just depends on whether you want the more 'vintage' feel and tone or a more modern twist on that...
     
  9. ieso

    ieso New Member

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    594 or keep your eye out for an SC58
     
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  10. Rider1260

    Rider1260 New Member

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    I like the CU22 better
     
  11. HANGAR18

    HANGAR18 What Would Evel Knievel Do?

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    I'm under the impression that if you use the tone knob on the 594, you will be able to do soft smooth jazz if you want to, or anything else you like for that matter. The 594's ought to be able to sound like anything except a Stratocaster or Telecaster.
     
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  12. Mozzi

    Mozzi https://imgur.com/user/BAMozzy

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    The 594's are like a Vintage Les Paul and as such offer the variety that they do - however, they also can offer reasonable SC tones too as they can be independently coil split. I know split Humbuckers don't really sound quite like a true Single Coil (except maybe Paul's Guitar) but even still, I don't think they offer quite the quack that a Strat does, It does open up more options and versatility than a traditional Les Paul though...
     
  13. HANGAR18

    HANGAR18 What Would Evel Knievel Do?

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    Yes, I essentially agree. The single coil tones on the 594 will have their own style of "good" tone. But if someone wanted a more of a Fender-ish tone from a PRS guitar, they would need to get either a Silver Sky or a Custom 24-08, Cu24, Custom 22 with a 5 way switch, Paul's Guitar, or a 408.
     
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  14. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Either way you’re good; it’s not possible to screw the pooch choosing between the two models. Both are superb.

    If you want a trem, get the CU22; it’s not available on a Core 594.

    If you want a stoptail, the 594 will get you closer to classic LP, and the stoptail isn’t available on the Core CU22.
     
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  15. danktat

    danktat Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist

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    If you get an older one, the stop tail was an option. That was one of the changes that I could have done without is eliminating the stoptail on the newer 22s.
     
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  16. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    I had probably 6 or 7 stoptail CU22s, starting with my Artist II back in ‘93 (pretty sure it was PRS’ first 22 fret model, and the body specs were like the 22). Great guitars. In fact, two were Dark Cherry Bursts - thought I saw that finish in one of your pics - what a classy color!

    I figured the OP was buying new.

    Truth is there’s enough overlap these days between the McCarty and CU22 that I can understand why PRS stopped offering the stoptail on the 22.
     
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  17. danktat

    danktat Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist

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    One of the things that I really like about the "cork sniffer" mentality of some PRS owners is that you can ALWAYS find a 10 or even 15 year old guitar that basically IS new. It will have been played two or three times a year, just when someone comes over that knows what they are looking at. And by the time it makes it to the used market, it is still basically a new guitar but at a better price.....and the woods have settled about as much as they are going to by then. Unlike a lot of [particularly] Fender fans, the idea of a guitar that is in "relic" condition doesn't seem to be nearly as big amongst the PRS people. And a pristine specimen is always available as a result. :) So, you CAN buy new if you want. But you don't really have to and can still get one in a "like new" condition.

    EDIT: YOu know I may just post this idea as a separate thread, just to get feedback from other people on this subject matter.
     
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  18. jvin248

    jvin248 New Member

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    .

    Do you use two sets of knobs or a single master volume master tone?

    I'd suggest keeping with the 22.

    Did you also test drive the SE 22?

    .
     
  19. pauloqs

    pauloqs PRS McCarty

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    I like the way idea. I’d be interested to see what people have to say.

    I’ve just seen two 2008/09 Royal Blue CU22 on Reverb sold as new. Probably new old stock. Personally I like a guitar that’s been played in and has some battle scars. The nice think is that even the older models seemed to have very durable frets. The CU22 I got used seemed to have been played and gigged a lot, but there is relatively very little fret wear. Interestingly I’m not into the over the top relic-ing that you get with some of Custom Shop Fender. I don’t condemn the people who like it, it’s just not my favorite brand of vodka. I just like to feel like the used instrument I’m getting has been favored by its previous owner.

    Edit: By the way, one of those new old stock CU22 had stoptail.
     
  20. danktat

    danktat Award winning tattoo artist ... Amateur guitarist

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    It has been posted in the General Discussion section :D
     
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