My band rejected my request to move from acoustic to electric guitar

I asked him point blank if he was taking the bullet for the rest and he initially said yes. But when I asked him what they exactly said, it was totally the opposite. The worship pastor said that I needed to be heard more. Funny how he lied initially and made it sound like this was everyone's decision.

Maybe I need to take a hint.

I would say, before doing what you said in your second quoted post here, talk to your worship pastor. Get his take on it. If he backs what they sound guy said, he very well could be the one telling the sound guy to do what he is doing. I would just tell the worship pastor that you need him to be very honest with you because you are not happy with the current situation and are ready to step away if you are not really needed there and are not allowed to move to an electric guitar, which the sound guys said is more appropriate for the music you are playing.

I know how disheartening these situations can be. I have been through a couple of them. The church that I walked away from is one that I helped save multiple times. We had a lightning strike that took out the sound system. I had a trailer full of PA gear that I used with my bands. I loaded the place up and got sound going in there that was better than what we had. People loved it. They had they bulk of my equipment in there for a few months. I finally had to tell them they needed to buy something because it was super inconvenient for me to have to keep hauling equipment back and forth when I needed it for gigs. Some of the less experienced sound guys managed to blow the horns out of two of my monitors. I had to replace the drivers on them. I unfortunately found out one was blown when we set up for a gig and couldn't hear any top end out of it. That put us in a pinch for monitors at the gig.

They had a sound guy there but he really didn't understand the equipment. He read some books and did some studying but I could tell by talking to him and seeing how he had the equipment connected that he didn't really understand things. He ran the board every weekend for a very long time. He got offended by something and stopped showing up. I ended up taking the board over and ran it for over a year and a half by myself every Tuesday and Sunday. I hooked everything up the way it should have been and was able to improve the sound by a lot. I also started training others to mix. The original guy decided to start showing up again. This looked like a really good thing. They were bugging me to be up on stage playing. His first night at practice, he started unhooking the outboard gear at the board and tried to hook it up the way it used to be. He jacked everything up and couldn't even get sound out of the system. We had to stop practice and I had to go back and hook it all back up because we couldn't' practice without at least monitors. I was nothing but nice to this guy but he seemed really ticked off that I knew more about the system than he did. He even said something to me to that effect. I offered to spend some time with him showing him how it all works and told him it has been running smooth for a good long while now. We used to have random issues when he ran it before. He got mad and stopped showing up again. I can't tell you how many comments I received about how much better things sounded and how people could hear everything much better than they could before I took it over.

I used to get positive comments from a number of people in the congregation about my playing when I was up with the praise team. They always wanted me to take solos. I tried to not do it and told them that I was supposed to be there to be a conduit and not get in the way of someone's worship. They bugged me to the point that I agreed that I would do one or two each week but wanted to keep it to a low number and would prefer it was something we were doing as a special instead of a worship song.

None of this mattered when the new guy came in. The thing that was the last straw for me is that one of the elders backed the new guy and didn't even try to be an advocate for me and everything I did in that church. All of the others on the praise teams were shocked that they were going to try to make me try out to keep the positions that I had already been doing there with great success. We even had a guy come in to evaluate the sound system at one point. He told our worship minister at that time to never lose me because I knew what I was doing and knew my stuff. It may have been a bit of ego on my part with not wanting to do the audition. I really didn't like the way it was presented to me. I had spent many tired mornings in there making sure things went off without a hitch. I felt like none of that mattered nor was it appreciated by the way they talked to me. I tried to work it out with them but the basically threw down the gauntlet. I wished them luck and took the rest of my equipment that I had been loaning them with me when I left.
 
Having been the Sound Engineer it always upsetting to me to have the worship leader tell me to turn someone off or down. It upset me more that it was me they were turning off, when it was them who asked me to be upthere and contribute to begin with. I eventually left my church after the hipocracy hit me between the eyes. But, that is a whole other diatribe.

I would recommend seeking a new house of worship, and get to know their team. Get permission, go to practices, play along with them. See if you are a good fit. Then ask the worship leader their thoughts and if there is an opening.
I've about had it. Folks here made me realize that I may not have been reading the room when all the signs were there.
 
Acoustic and electric guitar are very different instruments. A lot of guys coming from acoustic to electric confuse technology with technique. They cycle through pedals believing that they are the answer. I have been playing electric guitar since I was 15 years old and I am over 60 at the present time. I can play acoustic guitar, but not as well as electric guitar. There are just so many things one can do on a electric guitar that are impossible to do on an acoustic guitar. I am old school in that I rarely use a pedal board (I am a volume pot rider). I can understand the use of a pedal board in praise music. Quite a bit of that stuff sounds like a Muzak version of U2. Other than Lincoln Brewster, I have not been impressed by praise guitarists.
 
The funny thing is he is NOT credited with the work. He just mentions that he was part of the album.
I see a lot of "posers" hanging out a coffee shops Sundays with their scoots too. Doesn't mean they can hang with me on the racetrack. And just because I know how and am a licensed racer doesn't mean I'm a candidate for MotoGP either.
That "he" can run the mixing board doesn't mean he knows what guitar you can or should be playing either...
I'd pull a Pink Floyd and "Run Like Hell".
 
I would say, before doing what you said in your second quoted post here, talk to your worship pastor. Get his take on it. If he backs what they sound guy said, he very well could be the one telling the sound guy to do what he is doing. I would just tell the worship pastor that you need him to be very honest with you because you are not happy with the current situation and are ready to step away if you are not really needed there and are not allowed to move to an electric guitar, which the sound guys said is more appropriate for the music you are playing.

I know how disheartening these situations can be. I have been through a couple of them. The church that I walked away from is one that I helped save multiple times. We had a lightning strike that took out the sound system. I had a trailer full of PA gear that I used with my bands. I loaded the place up and got sound going in there that was better than what we had. People loved it. They had they bulk of my equipment in there for a few months. I finally had to tell them they needed to buy something because it was super inconvenient for me to have to keep hauling equipment back and forth when I needed it for gigs. Some of the less experienced sound guys managed to blow the horns out of two of my monitors. I had to replace the drivers on them. I unfortunately found out one was blown when we set up for a gig and couldn't hear any top end out of it. That put us in a pinch for monitors at the gig.

They had a sound guy there but he really didn't understand the equipment. He read some books and did some studying but I could tell by talking to him and seeing how he had the equipment connected that he didn't really understand things. He ran the board every weekend for a very long time. He got offended by something and stopped showing up. I ended up taking the board over and ran it for over a year and a half by myself every Tuesday and Sunday. I hooked everything up the way it should have been and was able to improve the sound by a lot. I also started training others to mix. The original guy decided to start showing up again. This looked like a really good thing. They were bugging me to be up on stage playing. His first night at practice, he started unhooking the outboard gear at the board and tried to hook it up the way it used to be. He jacked everything up and couldn't even get sound out of the system. We had to stop practice and I had to go back and hook it all back up because we couldn't' practice without at least monitors. I was nothing but nice to this guy but he seemed really ticked off that I knew more about the system than he did. He even said something to me to that effect. I offered to spend some time with him showing him how it all works and told him it has been running smooth for a good long while now. We used to have random issues when he ran it before. He got mad and stopped showing up again. I can't tell you how many comments I received about how much better things sounded and how people could hear everything much better than they could before I took it over.

I used to get positive comments from a number of people in the congregation about my playing when I was up with the praise team. They always wanted me to take solos. I tried to not do it and told them that I was supposed to be there to be a conduit and not get in the way of someone's worship. They bugged me to the point that I agreed that I would do one or two each week but wanted to keep it to a low number and would prefer it was something we were doing as a special instead of a worship song.

None of this mattered when the new guy came in. The thing that was the last straw for me is that one of the elders backed the new guy and didn't even try to be an advocate for me and everything I did in that church. All of the others on the praise teams were shocked that they were going to try to make me try out to keep the positions that I had already been doing there with great success. We even had a guy come in to evaluate the sound system at one point. He told our worship minister at that time to never lose me because I knew what I was doing and knew my stuff. It may have been a bit of ego on my part with not wanting to do the audition. I really didn't like the way it was presented to me. I had spent many tired mornings in there making sure things went off without a hitch. I felt like none of that mattered nor was it appreciated by the way they talked to me. I tried to work it out with them but the basically threw down the gauntlet. I wished them luck and took the rest of my equipment that I had been loaning them with me when I left.
What is wrong with these people. That was messed up what they did.

I was a PK and basically had no choice but to do everything from picking out the songs, setting up, setting up the board, doing the powerpoint, making sure everyone had copies of sheet music on their stands.
 
Acoustic and electric guitar are very different instruments. A lot of guys coming from acoustic to electric confuse technology with technique. They cycle through pedals believing that they are the answer. I have been playing electric guitar since I was 15 years old and I am over 60 at the present time. I can play acoustic guitar, but not as well as electric guitar. There are just so many things one can do on a electric guitar that are impossible to do on an acoustic guitar. I am old school in that I rarely use a pedal board (I am a volume pot rider). I can understand the use of a pedal board in praise music. Quite a bit of that stuff sounds like a Muzak version of U2. Other than Lincoln Brewster, I have not been impressed by praise guitarists.
I despise the ambient sounds or the Edge sound that these guitarists strive to reproduce. But sounds are chaning all the time in pop music so I feel like church music is stuck in the U2 area or by 20 years or more.
 
I despise the ambient sounds or the Edge sound that these guitarists strive to reproduce. But sounds are chaning all the time in pop music so I feel like church music is stuck in the U2 area or by 20 years or more.
Second that. While I do like the 80's pop guitar sound, with chorus and lots of verb, it is a bit dated...unless youre playing Rush, then its perfectly acceptable.
 
Assuming there's no biblical prohibition against being in more than one band (like Band Bigamy), you could play in your church on Sundays, but also join or put together a band where you can shine.

I mean, you don't really need to choose unless you want to.
 
Assuming there's no biblical prohibition against being in more than one band (like Band Bigamy), you could play in your church on Sundays, but also join or put together a band where you can shine.

I mean, you don't really need to choose unless you want to.
Maybe I should just create a gathering of people where people just sing without politics of church and the big drama...but that may be unrealistic.
 
Playing music in church should be an act of worship. If you’re not able to do that, then you shouldn’t be involved with a praise team. If the church is more concerned with production quality than it is with worship, then it shouldn’t call Itself a church, it should be called what it is -a concert venue and/or a business. I walked from a large church for exactly this reason.
 
Playing music in church should be an act of worship. If you’re not able to do that, then you shouldn’t be involved with a praise team. If the church is more concerned with production quality than it is with worship, then it shouldn’t call Itself a church, it should be called what it is -a concert venue and/or a business. I walked from a large church for exactly this reason.
This "business" music is a product of paid musicians who aren't believers and are just there to do a job.
 
This "business" music is a product of paid musicians who aren't believers and are just there to do a job.

If that’s the case, just get outta there. They aren’t going to treat you by the same set of rules you would treat them, they’re only going to make decisions based on producing what they feel they need to produce.

To have someone turn you down when you’re bringing a talent to share is really lame, as is no one having the guts to give you any constructive criticism, if any needs to be given.
 
This completely sucks.

A lot has been covered already. If I may put in my 2 cents: I believe it is not good for you to keep fighting it. On a personal or spiritual level. Something is completely skewed and being a guitar player in one of the biggest churches in my country: this kind of situations often come after there has been a tipping point, where a church is not stretched thin for volunteers, but has the luxury to choose from "talent".

Churches as a rule (big and small) have no problem with putting people on stage, but are notoriously bad being honest if (someone in charge) thinks it does not work, to take hem
off stage. Afraid to hurt feelings or (more often) shying away of their responsibility if it makes them feel uncomfortable.

However I do believe it is good to come up with a process how to handle this well. Who do you have to talk to, in order to prevent you from becoming bitter or angry and to get closure. How you want to do that is up to you, but be carefull to guard your heart. I have seen this go sideways way too often.
 
What is wrong with these people. That was messed up what they did.

I was a PK and basically had no choice but to do everything from picking out the songs, setting up, setting up the board, doing the powerpoint, making sure everyone had copies of sheet music on their stands.
Unfortunately I have a few more stories than the ones I shared. I was at the end of my patience with them when I finally walked. The forced audition was just the last straw for me.

The thing that bugs me about your situation is that those of us that were more advanced in our abilities at our church would take people under our wing and coach them to get them where they wanted to be. We never muted anyone, at least I didn't. I did lower some vocalists in the mix if I heard them having trouble staying on pitch during a song. I could usually hear these issues during the practice night and could talk to them about it. People nearly always know when there are issues like this. They feel it and feel that they are struggling with it. I always tried to turn it into a learning moment and offered assistance in helping that person improve. I built relationships with people through this and if they just couldn't get something right, they knew it and were very thankful for the help. You are not getting any of that and that bugs me. That is the thing that would make me walk away from this situation.
 
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