Music Rooms/Guitar Displays

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Solteroblues, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. Tucson Thump

    Tucson Thump New Member

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    Evidently you've "slip"ped up somewhere.
     
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  2. Tucson Thump

    Tucson Thump New Member

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    Wow! Green lawn, great guitar room, and a flashy shoe collection. My aspirations have been readjusted.
     
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  3. markie

    markie 11Top's personal Chauffeur

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    I just put up hangers on the walls of my basement. Works out pretty well................ Since that is where my wife makes me live!
     
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  4. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    ....and, if you heard me play, those aspirations would be dashed! :p
     
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  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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  6. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Mango.....???

     
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  7. WA Paul

    WA Paul It’s ok...I’m with Manny dog

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    Classic!

    Was thinking more like this though..

    [​IMG]

    Stained blue (also curly mango)

    [​IMG]
     
  8. jfb

    jfb Plank Owner

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    There are some sick rooms is this thread. Keep 'em coming!

    I keep all of my guitars in a closet. HAHAHAHA.
     
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  9. Alnus Rubra

    Alnus Rubra Loving nature’s wonders

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    When are they coming out?!:D
     
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  10. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    chuckle!
     
  11. WD 3D

    WD 3D Green is the new blue...

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    I just did some rearranging to get rid of the floor stands and clutter... there are still a few more guitars (like the Paul's Guitar from Experience this year and my telecaster that didn't make this wall).
    Top row are all PRSi, bottom row mostly autograph holders except my Breedlove in the middle.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Looking good!
     
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  13. Rider1260

    Rider1260 New Member

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    Great set up !!! my ceiling is to low to do the double row !!!
    Hmm that 3rd from the left looks familiar

     
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  14. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Speaking of studio decor, Mr. Les is fortunate, because he knows some gallery owners and artists, and has been given the Secrets of Hanging Artwork. Mr. Les is now going to give a short class in the Kollege of Artistic Knowledge, and give a pointer on How To Hang Artwork, Acoustic Treatment, And Speaker Placement. Maybe we’ll even get into Where To Put Amps For Best Sound at some point in this series.

    In galleries, museums, and homes of art collectors where professional art mavens hang work, there are some simple rules of thumb. One of them is that artwork should be hung so that the center of the work is 58” off the floor. This height is easy on the eyes, the neck isn’t craned to look at the work, and it’s also easy to view from a seated or standing position. It’s just one of those things that “works.” A good exception might be a very large work hung on a very large wall. There are always exceptions. But the rule of thumb of 58” to the center of the work is most often followed.

    If groups of work are to be hung, the center of gravity of the grouping should also be about 58” off the floor, if possible (again, there are always exceptions). The grouping should have some sort of unifying theme, say, similar frames, or several black and white photos, or several color photos, etc., to avoid looking like a random jumble.

    For good sonic reasons, acoustic treatment should be hung so that the center of the acoustic panel is around ear height when you’re seated. This will give you a balanced sound and maximize the effect of the acoustic panels.


    In a studio, artwork should not be placed where first reflections will bounce off the walls into one’s ears. First reflections off side walls should be where absorbent acoustic panels are hung (or placed on stands). There are lots of good sources to be found to help you determine mathematically where your first reflection points are, or how to locate it with a mirror. Look it up. I did it both ways and got the same location. Go figure.

    By and large, foam isn’t very good acoustic treatment, because it won’t handle the full frequency range, and is uneven at absorbing various frequencies, and works poorly at bass trapping. However, it beats a sharp stick in the eye if you have nothing else. The most effective acoustic treatments are membrane bass traps and absorbers, and where needed, diffusor panels (such as the stuff you often see on a studio’s rear wall with slats, or patterns of wooden blocks at different heights, etc.).

    Studio monitor speakers work best on stands 6” to a foot behind a work surface or recording console. The reason for this is it minimizes first reflections/comb filtering off the table, desk, or console. The purpose of nearfield monitoring is to hear mostly speakers, not reflections off furniture and walls. It’s the only way that good decisions can be made about mixes.

    Between the speaker and the stand, it’s best to have some sort of decoupling product. There are lots out there, and some work better than others, but that’s beyond the scope of this little episode. :) The point is that speakers vibrate what they’re sitting on, and stands will have a resonant frequency that will “ring” like a bell if the speaker hits a note that’s the same as the resonant frequency, and the speaker isn’t decoupled. Decoupling makes a difference.

    The speakers should be equidistant from the side walls - this is hugely important. If possible, they should be equidistant from the wall behind the speakers, and if they can’t be, the wall should be treated with bass traps and reflection absorbers so uneven bounce back doesn’t cause phase problems and weird comb-filtering issues.

    With most monitors, you want your ear to be just below tweeter level, and on a 2-way monitor, ideally right between the top of the woofer and the bottom of the tweeter. Again, this will maximize what’s coming off the speaker, and minimize what’s coming off the walls, ceiling and floor. If you can treat your ceiling, great, but that’s going to depend on a lot of things, and is beyond the scope of this little post.

    Some speakers with rear ports have different distance requirements from the back wall than others. Rear-ported Genelecs, for example, have very specific requirements. Other speakers do better with different distances. After much experimentation, every time I change monitors, I find that they sound better at different locations from the last pair of monitors. However, I like to have them a few feet from the back wall, and it also gives me room to get behind the equipment for wiring and the inevitable changes in the rack without killing myself. Just be aware that the distance matters sonically, and that treating that back wall is never a bad idea.

    The speakers are usually toed in to your head so that each speaker and your head forms an equilateral triangle.

    If your room doesn’t allow the speakers to be equidistant from the side walls, say, because there’s an open area on one side and a wall on the other, or a doorway is inconveniently located, try facing the desk into a corner, and put each speaker so that they’re equidistant from the walls on either side and the corner. And bass trap the Hell out of the corner, because that’s where bass builds up.

    Remember, you can’t mix what you’re not hearing accurately. No amount of gear can fix a poorly set-up room.

    Commercial studios that have large investments and lots of rooms, will generally have just the acoustic treatment on the walls (usually it’s built into the design), and not have cabinets and other junk around the recording space. It’s great to do that, but if you’re like me, and have “a” studio room, you need some cabinets for your mics and the junk that clutters up, the manuals, the extra pedals, tools, etc. I’ve found that sound pressure from guitar amps tends to make walls and ceilings buzz a little, so I like to have some mass along the walls to break that up. Bookshelves and cabinets aren’t bad at it (though they’re not really diffusers or absorbers, they’re simply mass), and they’re useful for storage, so have at it. Leave enough room on the top surfaces for being able to fiddle with mic mounts, working on a pedalboard, etc. But the point is that mass, and also stuffed furniture that absorb some of the sound pressure, is often a good idea if your room wasn’t designed by Russ Berger Design Group. ;)

    These days disk drives are supremely quiet, and SSD drives are dead silent. But if you have gear with fans, put it away from ear level, and if at all possible, somewhere you won’t be confused whether that noise is coming from the drives or from your monitors.

    That’s all I got for now. Next issue, Where The Hell Do I Put The Amps? :)
     
    #114 LSchefman, Jun 29, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
  15. Alnus Rubra

    Alnus Rubra Loving nature’s wonders

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    Rev. L. Schefman Esq. “mic drop”!

    Oh no that would never do, it would leave an unsightly mess on the studio floor and OCD will go into overdrive!

    The Scheff, out!!:p
     
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  16. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Hey. You want your walls to look as random as a hillbilly’s front lawn, knock yourself out. :)

    You don’t want to know how to set up the freakin’ studio monitors to get what you paid for, or place them in the room? Or to understand what acoustic treatment does, how it works, and where to put it? Not my call. All I can do is provide the info.
     
    #116 LSchefman, Jun 29, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
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  17. WA Paul

    WA Paul It’s ok...I’m with Manny dog

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    I just HAD TO go and measure nearly all of our wall art. Pretty scary that nearly all are within +/- 1” of the 58” rule! Some exceptions of course!:D

    Appreciate the speaker tips. I have small JBL LSR 305s with my toaster (Kemper) and putting them on isolation stands helped quite a bit. Also had to use low pass filter on the monitors to help cut some further frequency issues.
     
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  18. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    :) It’s the natural spot for the eyes to come to rest on, for some reason, right? I always wondered why galleries always looked so cool when the art was hung. So I found out.

    Sounds about right to me!
     
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  19. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    OK, so where’s the best place in a studio to put amps?

    And the short answer is, “Where they sound good.”

    The long answer is slightly more complicated if you want to capture the sound for recording. Some of it depends on room materials, such as carpet, tile or hardwood, some depends on room furnishings, some depends on construction methods and how well the room is treated.

    Ideally, you want to eliminate room modes and structural vibrations from interfering with the recording. You’re going to have the most bass reinforcement modes on the floor, in a corner, against the wall. It’s likely to be muddy sounding there, unless the corner and wall are acoustically treated.

    For the least room interaction, put the speaker cab on a stand about a foot or more off the floor. Put it away from walls and corners and...wait a second, here...in the middle of the room, you can get a lot of ceiling vibration that’ll rattle light fixtures, cause structural buzzes, etc. Think of the ceiling like a drum head. It sounds different near the rim, where it has less extension from striking with the stick, than it does in the middle. So sometimes it’s best to put the cabs somewhere between the walls and the middle of the room. Experiment.

    Sometimes the cabs are fine on the floor. Sometimes less so. Decouplers like the Auralex Grammas, and Isoacoustics products do a nice job of reducing mud in the room, and transmission of vibrations to the structure. If there’s too much mud/bass in a room, it’s going to show up on the track.

    Sometimes against the wall is OK, or even preferable.

    Sometimes you want to tailor the response using room acoustics to your advantage. Good. Great. Do it. You know what you want to hear. Try stuff.

    Too much bass, consider some decent bass traps. They cost about the same as a decent pedal, and you’ll probably have them longer. If the walls are shaking, put some mass between the cab and the walls. Bookshelves are fine, because books have a lot of mass lined up on a shelf, though don’t think of them as bass traps or diffusers. They aren’t. But mass helps with sound transmission to a degree (because sound is like water; if it’s not completely sealed off, it’ll leak through any opening, like wall plugs and switches, HVAC vents, under doors, through windows...you get the idea). Where you put the bookshelves matters. Move stuff around if you have to.

    Stuffed furniture can tame a room that’s too live. An old couch or padded armchair can help. As can heavy rugs (this is why you see rugs in so many studios).

    In a room that’s too dead (there are very few of these), put hard surfaces up to reflect sound.

    If your room is too small for the sound pressure levels, seriously, find a different room, unless you’re looking for the sound of a cab in a locker or small closet. Or use a modeler. A modeler is preferable to a really bad recorded sound.

    Hope this helps.
     
    #119 LSchefman, Jun 29, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
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  20. neokid2416

    neokid2416 New Member

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