Miley Cirus and the VMA's.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by ]-[@n$0Ma☩!©, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. vchizzle

    vchizzle Zomb!e Nine, DFZ

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    So your practicing...should we expect your 1st performance at EXP 13? :laugh:
     
    #21 vchizzle, Aug 27, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2015
  2. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    You bring up an interesting point. There are a ton of moving parts involved in record sales and promotion, and it's why very few independent recordings get noticed. The coordination is a massive effort.

    Bands work hard to make indie records, and struggle to get any airplay at all. But the fact is that music is still a major label game. While records aren't necessarily expensive to make in the greater scheme of things (though some of the good ones still cost a boatload), the machinery used to rise above the noise floor is very expensive.

    Labels pay radio promoters to break songs in most major markets. The cost of promoting a single that they think will be hot can run around $200,000-300,000 in a single market like New York or LA. Smaller cities often take their cues from these two, but radio promotion still costs six figures in markets like Philly, Denver, Pittsburgh, Dallas, Detroit, Phoenix, Miami, etc. That's six figures in each market, not six figures total.

    Even promoting to college radio (a proving ground for breaking new artists) costs around $20,000 for a single region, like the upper midwest, etc. Bands make great indie records and wonder why no one is picking up the music; well, this is one reason. You can make a great record, but then there's promotion that has nothing to do with touring, etc.

    These numbers are pretty accurate estimates as of as recently as 2010. And they don't even include billboards and other advertising.

    Before the record breaks, the publicists have gotten to work on the magazines. It's no coincidence that the covers of, say, Guitar Player, People, Rolling Stone, and more, of course, happen to be covering the same band at the same time. And oh yeah, the record just happens to be out that month.

    And while MTV isn't what it was, band videos from the majors are still watched like crazy on MTV and YouTube, and some are very elaborate. The good ones are expensive to make, using big time directors, art directors, and filmmakers. I just checked the video my son worked on, that won an MTV award, and it's gotten nearly eleven million views! That kind of thing certainly helps to sell a record.

    The labels and promoters arrange for live acoustic shows and interviews on radio all over the world as a tour progresses. This is good for both the radio stations with the exclusive interview with the artistt, whose fans tune in and don't change the channel for however long that lasts, and it's good for the artist to get that attention and exposure. It takes a little bit of clout to get these interviews all lined up in every city the band performs in.

    Meantime, deals have to be made to put the CDs out prominently on the remaining record stores' shelves. Yes, people still buy CDs (I for one can't listen to mp3s), and the prominent space takes some dealmaking between the chain and the label. And there is the in-store promotion as well, like posters, artist likenesses, etc.

    While all this is happening, the artists have to tour behind the record. Blanketing the US alone is hard work, and there's also the European. South American, Asian, and Middle Eastern markets (Turkey has huge fan bases for lots of rock bands, for example, and has a rock festival every summer, as do all of the European countries). Non-US sales are hugely important to the labels now that US profits have been reduced. Getting on one of the tour circuits for the summer festivals is a Big Deal. I don't know the amounts spent on touring, but imagine sending a large stage crew plus a band and all of its equipment all over the world, and you have a pretty expensive undertaking.

    So yeah, lots of money gets paid to an industry full of people. And with the proliferation of media outlets, more expensive now than ever. In the early days, there were maybe a couple of rock and roll stations in a market that played all of the rock, pop, and crossover records from genres like Motown or country. That is no longer the case. Now lots of radio stations, satellite radio, TV and internet have to be fed.

    A label like Sun could send an acetate out to a buddy at a radio station to break an artist like Elvis in 1956. If the phone calls came in, the label would cut the vinyl, and send more to other stations, creating a buzz. That almost never happens now. It really can't. There are too many artists, there isn't a truly "new" sound like there was in the early days when the electric guitar and rock combo were a novelty that is going to take the world by storm. Rock and roll is a mature business, and has to behave like other businesses, in a way. The investment level is a huge gamble.

    Then too, the world is down to what, three major labels and their subsidiaries? Warner, Sony, and UMG (which absorbed EMI's music division). That's it. It's very, very hard to be a player and to compete with these monoliths.

    This is why most small label deals are essentially "development deals," where the idea is to get the artist to a major label if the band can push, say, 10,000 or more CD/downlad sales, have people show up at its gigs, etc. That tells the labels that there's a buzz, and it might be worth investigating the artist for a deal.

    As I said, the investment is necessarily huge these days, and it ain't about ART. The investment has to be justified to the label's investors. And this is why there is a media push that is fairly obnoxious at times.

    Because for the most part, it's also necessary.

    For me the sad thing is that the labels don't continue to promote all the artists on their roster. It's always about the latest thing. So careers are short. A famous producer can have a long career, and the good ones have been making hits for 30, 40 years. Not so with many artists who've even sold a ton of records. And that's a shame. But the labels only have so many resources.
     
    #22 LSchefman, Aug 27, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013
  3. phillybri

    phillybri New Member

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    Who really cares what she did? She got into mommy's makeup and tried to act sexy and wound up looking quite stupid. BFD.

    What I'm sick of is groups like the Parents Television Council throwing a holier-than-thou hissyfit about this nonsense. If you stopped shrieking about it, nobody would give a sh*t!!!!
     
  4. rugerpc

    rugerpc A♥ hoards guitars ♥A Soldier 25, DFZ
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    Just watched the VMA video...

    When did it STOP being about the music??

    The VMA looks to be just as lame as Super Bowl halftime has become. Overproduced and gimmicky.

    GAG.

    Gimme just a plain old concert! I saw Chicago at the Meyerhoff in Baltimore recently - they just played their music. There was very little showmanship and glitz - there did not need to be. The music spoke for itself.

    Here's a little test. If the music sounds fine through headphones with your eyes closed, maybe there is something there. But if it takes skin and simulated sex acts, it is obvious that the music cannot stand on its own.

    YMMV
     
    #24 rugerpc, Aug 27, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013
  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Then again, there is skin and simulated sex; how is that a bad thing? ;)
     
  6. ]-[@n$0Ma☩!©

    ]-[@n$0Ma☩!© ▲▼▲▼▲▼▲▼▲

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    Gimmetry. :laugh:
     
  7. rugerpc

    rugerpc A♥ hoards guitars ♥A Soldier 25, DFZ
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    porn just isn't what it used to be.....
     
  8. JustRob

    JustRob Zombie Six, DFZ

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    You mean it used to have better music? Bow-chicka-wow-wow! :vroam:
     
  9. kevphol

    kevphol New Member

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    I get the hype and I get that at that level there is virtually no "bad" publicity. I just don't get her, not the music or the performance. Same thing with the performance from Niki Manaj a year or two ago. I think my age is showing. I can't get past that being "Hanah Montana" that my kids used to watch up there jumping around just acting and looking silly.
     
  10. RedGuitars

    RedGuitars Thread killer

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    Miley, and Niki Manaj for that matter, both make we want to vomit. Their 15 minutes are up.
     
  11. Jet Whitey

    Jet Whitey New Member

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    Didn't someone have to appologize to everyone a few years back for saying she'd end up a pole dancer????:iamconfused:
     
  12. jfb

    jfb Plank Owner

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    BRB learning how to twerk without dropping my PRS.
     
  13. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    I think we'll need a video once you have it mastered.
     
  14. Sekunda

    Sekunda Music is life

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    Yep, Jamie Foxx. Boy he was dead on :wave:
     
  15. cosmic_ape

    cosmic_ape Plays too many notes!

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    It's sad that the music business is no longer about music... Sad... It seriously makes me wonder why the hell I'm doing what I'm doing...
     
  16. jfb

    jfb Plank Owner

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    I believe it will take a life time.
     
  17. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc I like to party, mmm hmm, everybody does.

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    Any chance there's enough time to get the Official PRS EXP.2013 Twerk-off booty shorts printed?
     
  18. jfb

    jfb Plank Owner

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    I can make it happen.
     
  19. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Hey, no problem, I can wait for your 99 year old behind to twerk since I plan to live to be at least 1,000. :)
     
  20. alantig

    alantig Zombie Four, DFZ

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    "Simulated" makes it a bad thing.

    It stopped being about the music a long time ago.

    What's sad is there are artists out there who are much more talented and are producing much better music than the "flavor of the month" is. This past Saturday, I drove 2.5 hours to see VIntage Trouble for the fourth time in nine months. Worth every minute of the drive - they've yet to disappoint me. But I'll bet in their career they don't get the amount of attention that Miley Cyrus has gotten this weekend.

    Sadly, these scandals are what keep these people in the spotlight - would Britney Spears be much more than a footnote if not for all the goofy stuff that went on between albums?

    My favorite pics post-event:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

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