Let's see your rig

LSchefman

Historical Entity
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
29,375
Location
Michigan
I take the Kemper head/floorboard in one bag, two guitars in another (backpack style), and a Kabinet. Ready for sound guy, or no sound guy.
You, sir, are a better man than I!

Because I haven't gigged in a while.

"No one's asked you."

"That's not true! I got an email from a woman in Connecticut who heard my electronic music album and wanted my band to appear at her club!"

"But you don't have a band."

"Exactly. I had to tell her that. It was kind of embarrassing. But, true story!"
 

Bogner

Redwood Original
Joined
Jun 20, 2016
Messages
904
"How many amp tones did Jimmy Page need when he played with Zeppelin? Or Hendrix? Or The Beatles when they still toured? My son cut a major label record with one amp. You don't need every tone in the world to play guitar!"

"How many do you need?"
Jimmy used a ton of different gear for his sounds. If those people you mentioned were starting out today you can bet they would be using the latest gadgets available....amps, pedals, modelers, profilers, you name it. They used what they had back then because that is what they had.

How many sounds does a person need? Just the right one for what you are doing. It may or may not be the same sound for the entire song, set, record, etc. Options are good IMO. How else will I justify all my Kamps, Kedals, Kabs, Kuitars, Kempers, Kones, Kables, Kickups, Etc? :D
 

LSchefman

Historical Entity
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
29,375
Location
Michigan
How many sounds does a person need? Just the right one for what you are doing.
I've been on both sides of the 'how much stuff does one need' divide. I know this from long working experience in recording sessions:

The more stuff one has, the more difficult it is, and the more time is wasted, trying to find the right sound, instead of just getting on with it and prioritizing the music.

I also know that the 'right one for what you are doing' is whatever you have around that floats your boat that day, and if that's one or two things, it's always enough.

You probably know that over the past 33 years I've done a sh!t ton of soundtracks for Fortune 500 TV ads, broadcast documentaries, and film stuff. Lots of years I was asked to do music for international auto shows. My music has been part of a ride at Epcot Center of all things! I've been part of several Emmy-winning projects, as well as industry awards you no doubt haven't heard about. I've had the privilege of working with some of the finest session players in the world. While I play on my own tracks, there are times I bring in great players to work with, too.

I've always told my session players, just bring your favorite guitar and favorite amp, and we'll make it work. I hire them to sound like themselves, after all! No one's ever said they needed more than one of each. In fact, they expressed relief when I said that.

There have been many years I've worked with one guitar and one amp. In my Two-Rock days, 2003-2014, I had only one amp in the studio - whatever flavor of TR I was playing at the time. I did everything with it. The Artist II was my only electric guitar (other than a 12 String Rick, explained below) from 1992-1998; A Mira was my only electric for a year after it came out; my 30th Anniversary CU24 was my only electric for a year. The Artist V was my only electric for a year or more.

I've never owned more than one acoustic guitar at a time. Ever.

And there have also been years I've had a wider range of choices.

The choices have never meant that the creative work got any easier, or any better. One year I counted up my amps and I had 8 of the damn things. That was WAY too much for me; paralysis by analysis. I've never had more than a handful of electric guitars, though.

Sometimes it was just a tiny bit more fun to screw around with the gear, I'll grant you that. And yes, one can be inspired in different ways by different sounds. But no serious musician on this planet needs hundreds, or thousands, of amp sounds to be inspired to make music, and certainly not to record music. If you need more than one, you find a few and get on with it.

My experience has taught me that deeper experience with a smaller number of instruments and amps is a better choice for really good players doing original music, than a whole bunch of stuff where only the surface gets a shallow scratch.

I've only once had a client ask me to use a different guitar - the guy wanted a 12 string Rick on a track. This was in 1995. Every so often someone will ask for a little more, or a little less, gain from my amp sound.

Of course, I'm in the business of writing original music. No one has it in their heads that I don't sound like the guy on the record, because I'm the guy on the record. My choices shape that sound, and not someone else's.

Perhaps my perspective is different, but I've devoted most of my adult life to creating music, and this is what I've learned. Do you know more? Maybe. But I've made an awful lot of recordings since 1989, and have been well paid to do it. YMMV.

Edit: I'd like to make one more probably unwanted observation:

For some reason that I consider ludicrous, musicians want to be pigeonholed, guided by statistical metrics instead of artistic sense, and for that reason tend to sound alike.

What serious artist wants to sound like the same homogenized Michael Britt sound pack that everyone else uses? What serious artist doesn't want to carve out a chunk of sonic territory for themselves, and achieve a signature sound? What the hell is the point of the flavor of the month?

I'd rather listen to a Larry Carlton (just an example, don't get bent out of shape, insert name of favorite artist here) with his unique tone, than some person trying to cop that tone and mimic him.

There's an online service that bands and artists can use to determine what other bands they sound like. I understand why they do it, but I think it's a bad idea to invite the comparison, because most musicians don't really stack up very well against their purported stylistic sound/style marker, and would probably be better off promoting their uniqueness.

It's amusing that we live in a world where people can't even take a dump without their freaking smart phones in their hands to be entertained for ten seconds on TikTok, so I get folks' impatience with doing one thing well, but it ain't good for the world, and it certainly ain't good for artistic achievement.
 
Last edited:

dmatthews

Dave's not here...
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
10,906
Location
Vancouver, B.C. Canada
What serious artist wants to sound like the same homogenized Michael Britt sound pack that everyone else uses? What serious artist doesn't want to carve out a chunk of sonic territory for themselves...
The same kind of person that buys a HXDA or DG30? I dunno... We both know we won't sound the same either way. :)
 

Bogner

Redwood Original
Joined
Jun 20, 2016
Messages
904
I've been on both sides of the 'how much stuff does one need' divide. I know this from long working experience in recording sessions:

The more stuff one has, the more difficult it is, and the more time is wasted, trying to find the right sound, instead of just getting on with it and prioritizing the music.

I also know that the 'right one for what you are doing' is whatever you have around that floats your boat that day, and if that's one or two things, it's always enough.

You probably know that over the past 33 years I've done a sh!t ton of soundtracks for Fortune 500 TV ads, broadcast documentaries, and film stuff. Lots of years I was asked to do music for international auto shows. My music has been part of a ride at Epcot Center of all things! I've been part of several Emmy-winning projects, as well as industry awards you no doubt haven't heard about. I've had the privilege of working with some of the finest session players in the world. While I play on my own tracks, there are times I bring in great players to work with, too.

I've always told my session players, just bring your favorite guitar and favorite amp, and we'll make it work. I hire them to sound like themselves, after all! No one's ever said they needed more than one of each. In fact, they expressed relief when I said that.

There have been many years I've worked with one guitar and one amp. In my Two-Rock days, 2003-2014, I had only one amp in the studio - whatever flavor of TR I was playing at the time. I did everything with it. The Artist II was my only electric guitar (other than a 12 String Rick, explained below) from 1992-1998; A Mira was my only electric for a year after it came out; my 30th Anniversary CU24 was my only electric for a year. The Artist V was my only electric for a year or more.

I've never owned more than one acoustic guitar at a time. Ever.

And there have also been years I've had a wider range of choices.

The choices have never meant that the creative work got any easier, or any better. One year I counted up my amps and I had 8 of the damn things. That was WAY too much for me; paralysis by analysis. I've never had more than a handful of electric guitars, though.

Sometimes it was just a tiny bit more fun to screw around with the gear, I'll grant you that. And yes, one can be inspired in different ways by different sounds. But no serious musician on this planet needs hundreds, or thousands, of amp sounds to be inspired to make music, and certainly not to record music. If you need more than one, you find a few and get on with it.

My experience has taught me that deeper experience with a smaller number of instruments and amps is a better choice for really good players doing original music, than a whole bunch of stuff where only the surface gets a shallow scratch.

I've only once had a client ask me to use a different guitar - the guy wanted a 12 string Rick on a track. This was in 1995. Every so often someone will ask for a little more, or a little less, gain from my amp sound.

Of course, I'm in the business of writing original music. No one has it in their heads that I don't sound like the guy on the record, because I'm the guy on the record. My choices shape that sound, and not someone else's.

Perhaps my perspective is different, but I've devoted most of my adult life to creating music, and this is what I've learned. Do you know more? Maybe. But I've made an awful lot of recordings since 1989, and have been well paid to do it. YMMV.

Edit: I'd like to make one more probably unwanted observation:

For some reason that I consider ludicrous, musicians want to be pigeonholed, guided by statistical metrics instead of artistic sense, and for that reason tend to sound alike.

What serious artist wants to sound like the same homogenized Michael Britt sound pack that everyone else uses? What serious artist doesn't want to carve out a chunk of sonic territory for themselves, and achieve a signature sound? What the hell is the point of the flavor of the month?

I'd rather listen to a Larry Carlton (just an example, don't get bent out of shape, insert name of favorite artist here) with his unique tone, than some person trying to cop that tone and mimic him.

There's an online service that bands and artists can use to determine what other bands they sound like. I understand why they do it, but I think it's a bad idea to invite the comparison, because most musicians don't really stack up very well against their purported stylistic sound/style marker, and would probably be better off promoting their uniqueness.

It's amusing that we live in a world where people can't even take a dump without their freaking smart phones in their hands to be entertained for ten seconds on TikTok, so I get folks' impatience with doing one thing well, but it ain't good for the world, and it certainly ain't good for artistic achievement.
I agree with everything you said. I also agree with my comment you replied to. ;)

We have kind of delved into the needs vs wants territory a bit. I can make a lot of things work and I can also do a lot with very little. I also agree on simpler is better and of course in studio, time is of the essence so knowing you gear and how to use it and do what is needed/required quickly is crucial. I don't dispute that by any means but in some ways we are talking different things. As far as sounding like somebody else, who the hell wants to do that? Not me! I am the best me in the world and that is a fact. Nobody else can do what I do like I do it. (that may be good or horrifyingly bad) ;) But it is me and I own it. :)
 

LSchefman

Historical Entity
Joined
Apr 26, 2012
Messages
29,375
Location
Michigan
The same kind of person that buys a HXDA or DG30? I dunno... We both know we won't sound the same either way. :)
They're just amps. They respond more to the player than a model. It's just the truth.

I agree with everything you said. I also agree with my comment you replied to. ;)

We have kind of delved into the needs vs wants territory a bit. I can make a lot of things work and I can also do a lot with very little. I also agree on simpler is better and of course in studio, time is of the essence so knowing you gear and how to use it and do what is needed/required quickly is crucial. I don't dispute that by any means but in some ways we are talking different things. As far as sounding like somebody else, who the hell wants to do that? Not me! I am the best me in the world and that is a fact. Nobody else can do what I do like I do it. (that may be good or horrifyingly bad) ;) But it is me and I own it. :)
Yes, it's definitely not a very serious disagreement with you either, due to anomalies in the needs-wants continuum. ;)

I think we all have to do what works for ourselves as players. Just reporting on what I do, why I do it, and what I see players I work with doing.
 

Anachronism

Bassist with a guitar habit
Joined
Jun 12, 2018
Messages
68
full

full
 

Ivancy

New Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2022
Messages
10
Location
Spain
- 2005 Prs McCarty 20th anniversary with \m/ bridge pickup.
- Fractal Axe FM3 for FX and amp sims.
- Warwick gnome 300w class D bass amp for power.
- 4x12 Mesa Boogie Rectifier Oversized with v30 speakers.

I was using a Diezel Einstein tube amp before but recently went all digital with the FM3 and love it. It sounds as good plus it’s more versatile and much easier to carry on for gigs.
 

Bogner

Redwood Original
Joined
Jun 20, 2016
Messages
904
- 2005 Prs McCarty 20th anniversary with \m/ bridge pickup.
- Fractal Axe FM3 for FX and amp sims.
- Warwick gnome 300w class D bass amp for power.
- 4x12 Mesa Boogie Rectifier Oversized with v30 speakers.

I was using a Diezel Einstein tube amp before but recently went all digital with the FM3 and love it. It sounds as good plus it’s more versatile and much easier to carry on for gigs.
Nice rig! The Einstein is a cool amp. I don't think it ever got the credit it deserved.
 

Daryl Jones

non-practicing pacifist
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
572
Location
Alberta Canada
You, sir, are a better man than I!

Because I haven't gigged in a while.

"No one's asked you."

"That's not true! I got an email from a woman in Connecticut who heard my electronic music album and wanted my band to appear at her club!"

"But you don't have a band."

"Exactly. I had to tell her that. It was kind of embarrassing. But, true story!"
You can get over that, look what happened to Alan Parsons...(em, just saying):D
 

markd21

New Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2015
Messages
2,058
Location
St. Petersburg
I use a Line 6 Helix. I am currently going through schematics and layouts trying to decide what amp I want to build. I am torn between a Vibroverb w/mods, a clone of ODS 124, and a clone of any amp with an ef86 front-end.
 

Bogner

Redwood Original
Joined
Jun 20, 2016
Messages
904
I use a Line 6 Helix. I am currently going through schematics and layouts trying to decide what amp I want to build. I am torn between a Vibroverb w/mods, a clone of ODS 124, and a clone of any amp with an ef86 front-end.
You should do an updated version of a Mesa Road King...that'll learn ya. ;)
 
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