Is the current 57/08 bridge pickup warmer than the current DGT bridge pickup?

One of the things this video demonstrates clearly is that the DGT pickups sound a lot more like single coils when split than the 57/08s.

Probably the upper midrange and high frequency characteristics help a lot in that.
And that is one reason I have been thinking of trying the DGT pickups in my SAS with it having a single coil in the middle. I put a Fralin Blues Special in the middle of it years ago too.
 
I have a set of DGT pickups here and I have an SAS that I put 57/08s in years ago. I am very tempted to swap the DGTs into the guitar to see what it sounds like. The thing slowing me down on that is I like the sound of the 57/08s in that guitar. I have also wondered how the original SAS pickups sound in the guitar. I changed them so long ago that I don't remember them. I just remember I didn't dislike them. I changed them because I was trying to achieve more accurate split tones. I know now that can be done with resistors in the circuit. I have already installed the resistors with the 57/08s in it. If I get bored, I may do some experimenting with the DGTs and the original pickups. I know the 57/08s measure just a little higher than the original SAS pickups but I don't know if that will even matter... Decisions, decisions.
I understand the hesitance. Swapping pickups can really become routine if you do not enough. I’m only halfway there. Can’t blame you if you keep the 58/08s in, but I suspect the ash body could boost the midrange of the DGTs even a touch more. It could be awesome….
 
One of the things this video demonstrates clearly is that the DGT pickups sound a lot more like single coils when split than the 57/08s.

Probably the upper midrange and high frequency characteristics help a lot in that.
It's not all in the pickups tho. The DGT uses a unique coil splitting system. Uses capacitors.

I have not played a DGT.

But that method of splitting the humbuckers is a different method than splitting them through a 1.1K or 2.2K resistor to ground when the switch is flicked...PRS's other method.
 
It's not all in the pickups tho. The DGT uses a unique coil splitting system. Uses capacitors.

I have not played a DGT.

But that method of splitting the humbuckers is a different method than splitting them through a 1.1K or 2.2K resistor to ground when the switch is flicked...PRS's other method.
The DGT uses the resistor method. Mine has the same value resistors in it that my 594 has in it, which is different than the current 1.1k, 2.2k used in the current models. My DGT has an 8.8k and 2.2k in it.
 
The DGT uses the resistor method. Mine has the same value resistors in it that my 594 has in it, which is different than the current 1.1k, 2.2k used in the current models. My DGT has an 8.8k and 2.2k in it.
Hmmm...I thought that was the case. The DGT info I had is why I use that method with the resistors.

But someone posted yesterday that the DGT and Paul use capacitors!

Maybe I remembered wrong.

Sorry.
 
Here's the latest PRS DGT wiring diagram:

https://d159anurvk4929.cloudfront.net/documents/dgt_2017.pdf

Resistor taps (1k1/2k2) on the tone pot, standard 22nF tone cap, 180 pF treble bleeds. The only way to accurately test the resistance of a suspected 8k8 resistor is to disconnect one leg before reading with a DMM. A55pain!
Exactly the same way I wired my Black Bernie Marsden.

With one change. I didn't use 180 pf bright caps on either volume pot.

None of my Bernies came with bright caps, probably because of the "50's Mod" tone control wiring the Bernie's use that helps retain treble when the guitar's volume pots are turned down.

But the DGT's tone control is connected the same "50's Mod" way!

And the DGT does use bright caps on the volume pots to retain treble when the volume is turned down.

(They're not part of the coil splitting system tho)

Notice that the tone control is connected to the output of the switch, which also goes directly to the output jack and down your guitar cord.

So the tone control is connected at the very end of the guitar's circuit and after the volume controls. Most tone controls are connected to the INPUT of the volume control which is BEFORE the signal has passed through the volume pot.

Gives a different sound to the guitar and to the tone control.
 
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Here's the latest PRS DGT wiring diagram:

https://d159anurvk4929.cloudfront.net/documents/dgt_2017.pdf

Resistor taps (1k1/2k2) on the tone pot, standard 22nF tone cap, 180 pF treble bleeds. The only way to accurately test the resistance of a suspected 8k8 resistor is to disconnect one leg before reading with a DMM. A55pain!
Or read the color code on the resistor to find it's value. I can also tell you they are using carbon comp and carbon film resistors.
 
Or read the color code on the resistor to find it's value. I can also tell you they are using carbon comp and carbon film resistors.
Usually that is true, however they can occasionally be mislabeled at the factory, or change value over time (mostly carbon comp resistors). A properly used DMM tells no lies.
 
Exactly the same way I wired my Black Bernie Marsden.

With one change. I didn't use 180 pf bright caps on either volume pot.

None of my Bernies came with bright caps, probably because of the "50's Mod" tone control wiring the Bernie's use that helps retain treble when the guitar's volume pots are turned down.

But the DGT's tone control is connected the same "50's Mod" way!

And the DGT does use bright caps on the volume pots to retain treble when the volume is turned down.

(They're not part of the coil splitting system tho)

Notice that the tone control is connected to the output of the switch, which also goes directly to the output jack and down your guitar cord.

So the tone control is connected at the very end of the guitar's circuit and after the volume controls. Most tone controls are connected to the INPUT of the volume control which is BEFORE the signal has passed through the volume pot.

Gives a different sound to the guitar and to the tone control.
The tone pot is connected to the output of the 3-way switch so as to remain active in all switch positions. Not to debate the position of the tone pot, but since the circuit is passive, I'm not sure what difference that would make.

The way the leads cross in that diagram makes it difficult to differentiate between the switch's common vs. ground lugs, so it's confusing to look at. The ground wire from the bridge volume pot does not connect to the output, it connects to the switch's ground lug. Otherwise, you'd have a shorted circuit. Come on, PRS!
 
The tone pot is connected to the output of the 3-way switch so as to remain active in all switch positions. Not to debate the position of the tone pot, but since the circuit is passive, I'm not sure what difference that would make.

The way the leads cross in that diagram makes it difficult to differentiate between the switch's common vs. ground lugs, so it's confusing to look at. The ground wire from the bridge volume pot does not connect to the output, it connects to the switch's ground lug. Otherwise, you'd have a shorted circuit. Come on, PRS!
Try it both ways and hear for yourself.

The location of the tone pot makes a difference.

Most tone controls are connected at the INPUT of the volume pot along with the pickup.

All you have to do is unsolder and move the tone pot from the INPUT of the volume pot (same terminal the pickup is connected to) and resolder it to the MIDDLE terminal. The middle terminal is the OUTPUT of the pot and places the tone control AFTER the pickup signal has passed through the volume pot in the circuit.

You'll hear a difference and probably like one sound more than the other.
 
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Considering I have the same resistors in two PRS guitars, I trust the color codes on them.
No worries, Jason. I've found when building amps, even the markings on components are incorrect, most often the factory foil hash on a capacitor. I always confirm and mark the foil with a sharpie marker, and it's wrong about a third of the time. I would agree the resistor color code is most likely correct, taking the batch tolerance into consideration (it could be more than 20%). I have a batch of 100K carbon comp resistors that test between 72-85K. OLD! And you'd expect them to become more resistive over time, not less. An 8K8 resistor to ground on a tap sounds like it would function as a boost! But the only thing that matters if whether it sounds good, and if you like it, rock on, brother! :cool:
 
No worries, Jason. I've found when building amps, even the markings on components are incorrect, most often the factory foil hash on a capacitor. I always confirm and mark the foil with a sharpie marker, and it's wrong about a third of the time. I would agree the resistor color code is most likely correct, taking the batch tolerance into consideration (it could be more than 20%). I have a batch of 100K carbon comp resistors that test between 72-85K. OLD! And you'd expect them to become more resistive over time, not less. An 8K8 resistor to ground on a tap sounds like it would function as a boost! But the only thing that matters if whether it sounds good, and if you like it, rock on, brother! :cool:
I am not saying that the actual value is 8.8k. What I am saying is that is what they decided to use and they use different values now. The 8.8k that they used in both of these guitars that I have are carbon comp. They used carbon film for the 2.2k resistor. I completely understand that they can be higher or lower due to tolerances. I am not trying to say that the actual value is what they are labeled. I expect they were within tolerances when they installed them.

I am by no means a master electrician. I am sure you have spent more time with a soldering iron in your hand if you build amps. I have built some pedals and fixed some amps but it is a side hobby for me. I am pretty decent with a soldering iron and have a bit of experience using one. I know about these components but I am sure there is more I could learn.
 
I am not saying that the actual value is 8.8k. What I am saying is that is what they decided to use and they use different values now. The 8.8k that they used in both of these guitars that I have are carbon comp. They used carbon film for the 2.2k resistor. I completely understand that they can be higher or lower due to tolerances. I am not trying to say that the actual value is what they are labeled. I expect they were within tolerances when they installed them.

I am by no means a master electrician. I am sure you have spent more time with a soldering iron in your hand if you build amps. I have built some pedals and fixed some amps but it is a side hobby for me. I am pretty decent with a soldering iron and have a bit of experience using one. I know about these components but I am sure there is more I could learn.
Jason, are you saying that PRS used to use 1.1K and 2.2K but now use 8.8K to ground to split humbuckers?

If so, how about the Paul and the DGT now? Are they split with 8.8K resistors too?
 
Jason, are you saying that PRS used to use 1.1K and 2.2K but now use 8.8K to ground to split humbuckers?

If so, how about the Paul and the DGT now? Are they split with 8.8K resistors too?
The other way around. My DGT has an 8.8k and 2.2k in it. The new ones use the 2.2k and 1.1k. My 594 has the 8.8k in it as well.
 
I have a set of DGT pickups here and I have an SAS that I put 57/08s in years ago. I am very tempted to swap the DGTs into the guitar to see what it sounds like. The thing slowing me down on that is I like the sound of the 57/08s in that guitar. I have also wondered how the original SAS pickups sound in the guitar. I changed them so long ago that I don't remember them. I just remember I didn't dislike them. I changed them because I was trying to achieve more accurate split tones. I know now that can be done with resistors in the circuit. I have already installed the resistors with the 57/08s in it. If I get bored, I may do some experimenting with the DGTs and the original pickups. I know the 57/08s measure just a little higher than the original SAS pickups but I don't know if that will even matter... Decisions, decisions.

I’m new to this forum and to PRS guitars so hopefully this isn’t a dumb question. Are you trying to achieve the partial split coil by wiring resistors in the circuit? Does anyone know the percentage of signal from the second coil that is included in the DGT partial split coil? I’ve never played a guitar with split coils that were as usable as the DGT. I’m guessing the ratio of the 2nd coil for the partial split has a lot to do with this. Would the resistor you’d need to achieve a similar percentage with another pickup like the 57/08 be different depending on the pickup?
 
I’m new to this forum and to PRS guitars so hopefully this isn’t a dumb question. Are you trying to achieve the partial split coil by wiring resistors in the circuit? Does anyone know the percentage of signal from the second coil that is included in the DGT partial split coil? I’ve never played a guitar with split coils that were as usable as the DGT. I’m guessing the ratio of the 2nd coil for the partial split has a lot to do with this. Would the resistor you’d need to achieve a similar percentage with another pickup like the 57/08 be different depending on the pickup?
I used 1.1K and 2.2K for both sets of pickups I've split.

One set is a Bare Knuckle Abraxas and the other set a Duncan 59 and JB.

Both sets are pretty different but sound great split (especially the 59 and JB set!) so the next set I want to split, I'll do it the same way.
 
The tone pot is connected to the output of the 3-way switch so as to remain active in all switch positions. Not to debate the position of the tone pot, but since the circuit is passive, I'm not sure what difference that would make.

The way the leads cross in that diagram makes it difficult to differentiate between the switch's common vs. ground lugs, so it's confusing to look at. The ground wire from the bridge volume pot does not connect to the output, it connects to the switch's ground lug. Otherwise, you'd have a shorted circuit. Come on, PRS!


It's connected to the output of the switch and guitar because that's the only way it can be done and have one tone control for both pickups.

Three knob Flying V's and Explorers are wired the same way.

There's no other way to do it.
 
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