Is fading finishes still a problem?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Erik, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. Erik

    Erik New Member

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    I know this was pretty common with the 90s and early 2000s guitars but have prs actually taken steps to prevent this?

    A little fading is expected but some of the pictures ive seen of <10 year old guitars are kind of embarassing.

    From what i've read it doesnt help that my favourite stains are variations of blue.
     
  2. ReptilianNosewood

    ReptilianNosewood New Member

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    I have a 2008 in Santana Yellow that has no fading whatsoever, but yellow is not prone to fading anyway.
     
  3. PeteHill

    PeteHill Been hanging around a while

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    I find my CE24 in Whale Blue too dark, would it 'lighten' if I exposed it more to UV?
     
  4. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Lots of sunlight would do the trick
     
  5. Bill SAS 513

    Bill SAS 513 Just another old guy in a T-shirt

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    I have a 513 in Whale that has an awesome darker top, but the light has to be just right to see it...I have considered it...but haven't had the guts, yet...maybe this summer...direct sun lite might just make it perfect.
     
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  6. charliefrench

    charliefrench New Member

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    Color fade seems to happen with just about everything that is out there. Clothes, cars, beach balls, etc. I cannot comment on the steps PRS R & D may have done to prevent this but they do supply a case or a gig bag with each guitar. If we keep our guitars protected from UV by storing them in their cases when not in use the fade will be minimized. Some colors may be more prone than others. Blues, for example.
     
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  7. charliefrench

    charliefrench New Member

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    Almost certainly, it would. Check it into your local UV tanning salon for a weekend if you want quick results :eek:
     
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  8. bluefade

    bluefade New Member

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    From DUST to DUST...
     
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  9. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Fading finishes were never a "problem" except with folks who don't get what's involved.

    That's because what makes PRS colors reveal the wood so well necessarily involves photosensitive, organic stains and dyes. You want transparent beauty, you need certain stuff to achieve it, and the price is a certain amount of sensitivity to light.

    Here's the deal: transparent stains and dyes are usually organic; opaque stains can be organic or inorganic. With a PRS, people tend to want to see the wood grain. So organic dyes and stains get used. But the wood grain shows through better.

    There aren't any miracles to be had here. It's purely a matter of chemistry and physics.

    If you want permanent colors, you need inorganic stain that is far less transparent, or you need to pick a color that's less photosensitive. Or you need a painted guitar.

    If you want to show off the grain of wood, organic stains and dyes do this job. Certain colors, like blue, green and purple, fade more than others. Browns, reds, and yellows tend to fade gracefully.

    You can minimize fading simply by keeping a guitar cased when not in use. The more light it sees, the greater the likelihood that the stains or dyes react to the light. Sometimes the reaction to a certain amount of light triggers a certain amount of chemical activity that continues even when the light source is removed.

    My suggestion is to get a guitar whose tone and feel you like, and worry about more important stuff, like how you're going to put together a stash of money for your next guitar.

    One of my Private Stocks is all blues, greens, and violets. It's gonna fade. Sounds incredible, plays great. It'll outlive me by hundreds of years, and sound great until it's eaten by worms.

    So it goes. ;)
     
    #9 LSchefman, Mar 12, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2017

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