In Honor of Ukraine: Orchestral Piece

LSchefman

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I've had a really hard time thinking about the consequences of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. It's been hard to be creative, since usually I have to be calm to enjoy creativity,

But somehow this is the result of the last three weeks or so. It's an invasion tone poem, if there can be such a thing. I honor the freedom of Ukraine and their resistance, and needed to put it musically. If by some miracle this hits home for you, feel free to share it.

My music isn't political, because I don't think of peace and freedom as politics. I think of these things as the essence of existence on this earth.

 
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LSchefman

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Thanks all. I feel a special affinity For Ukraine. My paternal grandmother was Ukrainian, but that's not really the important thing.

The Ukraine has struggled to maintain its identity and its freedom for the last 1000 years. Over and over, its allies and the world have abandoned it to megalomaniac despots.

It breaks my heart to see it happening now. Their bravery in the face of the current assault is an inspiration to me.
 

DreamTheaterRules

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My paternal grandmother was Ukrainian, but that's not really the important thing.
Well, it is AN important thing, even if not THE important thing. :(

I realized tonight that one of the people who sings in our choir and plays in our orchestra at church, is the daughter of the missionary that I mentioned previously in [email protected] Romania! I previously said Ukraine, he's not there, he's in Romania. I spoke with my brother again about this last night and he corrected me. He is in the northern section, close to Ukraine boarder, and is helping people that get across the boarder. His daughter is here while in college and I knew it was “family” but didn’t realize it was her dad!

The closer this gets to home, the more angry I get.
 
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LSchefman

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The closer this gets to home, the more angry I get.
Here are a few salient facts people aren't aware of that they should know; before I begin though, nations enter into treaty relationships only with other sovereign nations. Russia's claim that Ukraine is part of Russia is nonsense; they recognized Ukraine's sovereignty in no fewer than 5 treaties before the current invasion.

1. In 1994 Ukraine signed a treaty with Russia known as the Budapest Memorandum. This treaty guaranteed Ukraine's security, and as a result Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons. The three powers that guaranteed Ukrainian security were the Russian Federation, the UK, and the US, and this treaty specifically prohibited using military force or economic pressure against Ukraine.

This treaty was violated by Russia, although, the US and UK haven't exactly followed through on their guarantees, limiting their reactions to sanctions.

2. In 1997, there was the Russo-Ukrainian Treaty, including the recognition of the inviolability of Ukraine's existing borders, and pledged other cooperation.

3. In 2009, Russia and the United States released a joint statement that the memorandum's security guarantee would still be in place following the START treaty.

4. These treaties were violated in 2014, when Russia subsumed the Crimea, and they were violated again in 2017's proxy war via so-called 'breakaway republics' began, and disguised and mercenary Russian troops began a shooting war. In addition, two additional treaties entered into by Russia in 2014 and 2015, Minsk I and Minsk II were violated by Russia immediately and in 2017.

5. All of these treaties and assurances by Russia were violated by Russia. There are significant parallels between this gradual dismemberment of Ukraine, and Germany's dismemberment of Czechoslovakia in 1938-9 in violation of the Munich Accords. Putin learned his lessons well, including the claim that ethnic Russians were being mistreated - a lie, and the very same pretext used against Czechoslovakia when Hitler claimed ethnic Germans were being mistreated. I guess there aren't all that many pretexts out there, because Putin couldn't think of anything original.

6. Under the terms of the Budapest Memorandum, the UK and the US have every right to assist Ukraine's defense of its territory, and in fact, I'd suggest they have the obligation to do so. Additional signatories were China and France, though their responsibilities under the Budapest accord are lower.

7. In 2014 Ukraine got rid of a Russian-backed government that took orders from Moscow; this is when Russia chose to invade the Crimea. In 2015 and 2019, Democratic reform governments were elected, Zelensky's government being the more recent one.
 
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aphantomvaper

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I'm with you Les, on an internet forum, and agree. The composition is haunting and resolved positively!

I hope the resolution in the conflict is the same. I've been telling people about the pre WW II Checkloslovokia maneuver in comparison to the current state of affairs and few remember the history.

Thanks for sharing that! Did you play any of these parts, or all of them, yourself? It's really fantastic!
 

LSchefman

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I'm with you Les, on an internet forum, and agree. The composition is haunting and resolved positively!

I hope the resolution in the conflict is the same. I've been telling people about the pre WW II Checkloslovokia maneuver in comparison to the current state of affairs and few remember the history.

Thanks for sharing that! Did you play any of these parts, or all of them, yourself? It's really fantastic!
Yup, played all the parts - using a keyboard.

Thanks for the very kind words, everyone!
 

LSchefman

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Great job Mr. Les! My heart is with the Ukrainian's all those throughout the world who are suppressed by their and other governments!! May peace and freedom reign in the near future!!!
Thanks, Moondog. Much appreciated!

My heart breaks for the suffering in Ukraine. Indeed, may peace and freedom return!
 

Mike J.

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Wow. As others have said, very haunting. All I could picture was those millions of faces who couldn't even begin to tell you why their lives are being destroyed. But at about the 2:18 mark I could hear that bit of hope make its entrance.

Very well done.
 

LSchefman

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Wow. As others have said, very haunting. All I could picture was those millions of faces who couldn't even begin to tell you why their lives are being destroyed. But at about the 2:18 mark I could hear that bit of hope make its entrance.

Very well done.
Thanks, Mike, glad you liked it!

One change I'd like to make is to work on the more positive part and develop it more. Not quite sure where I want to go with it.
 

McMahon67

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Holy cow…… that was amazing sir! I loved how it transitioned from dark and overwhelming to bright and hopeful…. Well done!
Thank you!
 

Mike J.

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Thanks, Mike, glad you liked it!

One change I'd like to make is to work on the more positive part and develop it more. Not quite sure where I want to go with it.
The thing I like about where the hope comes in is: this may be hard to explain but it's like, the war and the conflict are over. We're standing here looking at the ruins of our country and while it's a dismal sight at least we can start rebuilding our lives. It's going to be tough but we'll do it.

So while it wasn't a total "jumping for joy hope" the optimism was there. A weary optimism but a step in the right direction.

Right or wrong that's my take on it.
 

LSchefman

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The thing I like about where the hope comes in is: this may be hard to explain but it's like, the war and the conflict are over. We're standing here looking at the ruins of our country and while it's a dismal sight at least we can start rebuilding our lives. It's going to be tough but we'll do it.

So while it wasn't a total "jumping for joy hope" the optimism was there. A weary optimism but a step in the right direction.

Right or wrong that's my take on it.
You're not wrong, it's exactly the feeling I wanted to convey. You're a very perceptive listener, as are others here who've contacted me about the piece. It's really interesting for me to hear how other people feel about a project. It seems to help and inspire if other people 'get it'. And you get it. That's awesome.

I was thinking if I could incorporate a musical reference to the Ukrainian national anthem, it might be moving.
 
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