I caved to a modification

Discussion in 'Electric Instruments' started by danktat, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc Get in, loser, we’re going shopping.

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    Interesting, I’ll have to read up on that.


    I’m severely disappointed in how my public schools presented science. I failed so many science classes as a kid because I thought it was so boring! In reality, that stuff is fascinating.
     
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  2. Tone-y

    Tone-y New Member

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    Yeah but apart from the windows and the aqueducts, what have the Romans ever done for us?
     
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  3. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    My wife headed up a science and math mentoring program for kids in our county, and I understand that these real-world mentors got a lot of kids interested, and many achieved scholarships to prestigious colleges.

    I think that the problem with most science classes is that the material is so theoretical, and except for kids who are really into the language of science, it all seems boring and irrelevant. So a few kids who are naturally inclined in science do well, and the rest struggle with the concepts - there’s no apparent purpose for knowing all this!

    I used to literally fall asleep after about page two of my science textbooks, and I was actually a good student! But there wasn’t anything that ever told me what all this stuff was for, so I was bored to tears.

    Granted, that was a VERY long time ago, and maybe things changed by the time of the Renaissance. ;)

    Wouldn’t it be more fascinating if there was a project incorporating math and science. Here’s an example: “We want to make a guitar amp. Let’s start with the basics. What does a guitar amp actually do, and how does it work?” And then the class can be taken through the basics of AC, DC (basic electricity stuff); vacuum tubes (electrons in a vacuum, heated); other parts of the circuit (resistance,and so on), etc.

    And there could be stuff like acoustics, and signal distortion, and all kinds of interesting side-trips, right down to what glue consists of, and how to make Tolex stick to wood.

    Seems like there’s a lot of good science to learn that way, plus it could be fun.

    I’m sure my example sucks and is put in an un-scholarly way, but you get the basic idea. I will bet that the engineers on this forum would have some great ideas, and probably many of them had excellent teachers who got them interested. If I was a teacher, and knew scientists and engineers, I’d want to know what got them interested.
     
  4. Tone-y

    Tone-y New Member

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    There, fixed it for you
     
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  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Here are a few things of interest, of course there are many more:

    1. They invented the representative form of government known as a republic, as opposed to participatory democracy a la the Athenians. We live in a republic.

    2. Justinian’s Code and other Roman law was a basis for European legal systems until largely modified by Napoleon’s Code. You’d be interested to know that Code law (as opposed to the common law) was the basis of law in originally French Louisiana.

    3. The system of dioceses and officials running them was adopted by the early Roman church, and still exists.

    4. They invented the pipe organ.

    5. We still use the Roman alphabet.

    6. The Roman calendar was still in use until about the 18th Century (I think that was around the time it was switched).

    7. The Romans were into cleanliness, and had bath houses for the public.

    8. The Romans invented plumbing, and even invented the valve for use with it.

    9. The Romans had heated flooring in places like bathhouses.Unfortunately, you wouldn’t have wanted to be a slave making sure the heat was working underneath the flooring, but you know..

    10. They had perhaps the first professional laundries.

    11. Rome invented the shopping mall, and Rome had a huge three or four story one (Trajan’s Market).

    12. Most ordinary Romans didn’t often cook in their apartments (that were multi-story, though they didn’t invent the apartment); they ate at street cafes.

    13. Roman legions had running water in their latrines, and cleaned themselves after doing their business.

    14. Roman medicine wasn’t surpassed until after the American Civil War. They could operate on cataracts, invented the use of sutures, knew about poppy derivatives for anaesthesia, had primitive antiseptics even though they didn’t understand germs, knew about various herbal remedies, were the first to use dissection to understand how the human body actually worked, etc., etc. A Roman soldier was more likely to survive a wound than a Civil War soldier. Think about that!

    15. By the third century AD, Roman cavalry adopted the heavily armored cataphract idea from the Parthians, and improved on it, creating plate armor, etc. The Romans also used chain mail before the time of Caesar. The cataphract was the ancient world’s human tank.

    16. Roman legions invented the idea of the salary, so called because the soldiers were partially paid in salt (salarium). Salt was valuable.

    17. The Romans built paved roads all over Europe, so that their armies could move freely. Their roads were so solidly built that some have lasted until the present day. They invented a machine to measure mileage where a wheel turned a gear, and the gear spilled a little ball into a basket after intervals of one mile (which was mille passum, or 1000 paces). Mile markers were erected to show distances.

    18. They invented concrete that could solidify under water to build piers and docks. And the dome, and probably the curved arch, as opposed to post-and-lintel.

    19. Roman basilicas were large, multistory public buildings that had courtrooms and other government facilities that would look familiar to us. And some had stores and shops on the ground floor. So yeah, if you want to blame ‘city hall’ on someone, blame those guys!

    20. They invented the true stadium, which is in itself a Latin word, and not only that, the Coliseum in Rome had a retractable canvas roof over the stands that could be used to shield them from the sun and rain. They held re-creations of sea battles in the Coliseum - this was once doubted by historians, until during the 20th Century, they found the actual plumbing pipes that brought in the water!

    21. They also did a bunch of stupid stuff. Everyone does. :)

    I could probably think of other things, but I have to actually work today at some point! ;)
     
    #45 LSchefman, Jun 20, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
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  6. Tone-y

    Tone-y New Member

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    Actually, where I live quite a few remains of Roman villas have been discovered. Mosaic floors are found by farmers plowing their fields. I'm also near the city of Bath, named after the Roman baths that are still there, fed by hot springs
    https://www.romanbaths.co.uk/walkthroughs/great-bath
     
  7. Ryan Murphy

    Ryan Murphy Stares at bright lights

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    Romans. The original turd herders.
     
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  8. Alnus Rubra

    Alnus Rubra Loving nature’s wonders

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    Fun fact #4: Getting high is probably most fun.

    Well there was the wine!
     
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  9. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc Get in, loser, we’re going shopping.

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    Absolutely.
     
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  10. 11top

    11top Cousin Eddie's cousin

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    You forgot Noble Roman’s pizza.
     
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  11. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Booze and weed....nuff said.....:cool:
     
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  12. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    We don’t have that here.

    However, we have Papa Romano’s pizza, and Romanoff vodka. Yeah, I know. ;)
     
  13. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    The Roman baths there are incredible! Most Americans don’t know that Britain was a Roman province for hundreds of years.

    Have you been to Vindolanda?
     
  14. Herr Squid

    Herr Squid I was severely impressed

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    You're so right. I had decent science teachers in public school, but the way history is taught sucks so badly. I picked up an interest in history because my father was in the US army, stationed in Germany in the early 70's, and that was just so weird to me I had to find out why that came about. That kindled an interest in World War II history that carried over to other periods in time. One of my favorite college courses was a course in Greek and Roman literature that was taught by a pretty amazing professor. So there were all these incredible stories, drama, history, poetry written by the people living in those times. And the thing that struck me was how smart, clever, generous, ruthless, and just plain cruel people have been for the last 2 or 3 thousand years. Our technology has come a long way, but a genius of old could hold his own against today's, I'm quite sure. It's also pretty impressive that while a lot of ancient authors (i.e. Herodotus) have been debunked in "modern" times, but as we make more and more archaeological discoveries we find more and more evidence that those authors were not making their stuff up.
     
  15. Herr Squid

    Herr Squid I was severely impressed

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    Most? MOST!?

    I'd believe "some" and be OK with that. But... see Sergio's remarks about how much history education sucks in these parts.
     
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  16. Herr Squid

    Herr Squid I was severely impressed

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    That is stunning! I went to Herculaneum instead of Pompeii when I was in Naples a few years ago. I didn't see anything in nearly that condition. Perhaps I chose poorly...

     
  17. Glide-bpm

    Glide-bpm We were small but we were slow...

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    Somebody say weed???........ o_O:confused::D
     
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  18. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Well, a 2008 study mentioned in Smithsonian Magazine found that only half of Americans can name the 3 branches of government.

    A Texas Tech study found that more students failed to know who won the civil war, didn’t know that the emancipation proclamation came after the American Revolution, etc, than knew these facts. And these were college students. However, they did really well when questioned about reality TV shows. :rolleyes:

    Another study found that only 38% of American citizens could pass a citizenship test. o_O

    And you think the majority of Americans know anything about Roman Britain?
     
    #58 LSchefman, Jun 21, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2019
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  19. Tone-y

    Tone-y New Member

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    I'm afraid not. It's a bit too far up north for me. I'm a southerner
     
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  20. Alnus Rubra

    Alnus Rubra Loving nature’s wonders

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    ....and por...... oops!:oops:

    The Romans didn’t fair too well north of the border!

    Hail Caledonia!:D
     
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