How to Save your Guitar from Summer Heat Damage

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by CoreyT, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. CoreyT

    CoreyT PRS Addiction

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Messages:
    5,211
    Likes Received:
    423
    Taken from a newsletter I just received in my email.
    Article by Ted Drozdowski 8 12 2013

    Great advice here although from a different guitar maker.
    Anyone who has seen my pic of guitars can probably guess what newsletter it was in.

     
  2. clcwarlock

    clcwarlock New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2012
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    16
    I have been wondering about the humidity situation for my electric guitars. We got a lot of rain on the east coast this year and I notice my humidity going up to 60% to 70% Max. I have been thinking about getting a dehumidifier just wondering if I really need it? I have a humidifier for Winter so I already got that covered.
     
  3. CoreyT

    CoreyT PRS Addiction

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Messages:
    5,211
    Likes Received:
    423
    One thing a reader commented on over where this was posted was that people often play their guitars out in the heat such as at an outdoor venue, or if it is high humidity.
    What do you do then since the guitar can be exposed to high heat and sun when playing outdoors?

    Fortunately all of my playing is in my living room where the humidity is around 49 to 50%, or out on my porch when it is nice out, but out of the direct sunlight.
     
  4. frankb56

    frankb56 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2013
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    5

    Got the same problem and also wondering what to do. I keep my regulars on a six guitar stand (five guitars and a bass) with the lights out, shades down, door closed and A/C set at 74 Degrees all day. Still notice that the humidity level in the room stays at 70%. However, I have not noticed any warping or fret rise, etc. So, I'm not sure if I should worry about this.
     
  5. vchizzle

    vchizzle Zomb!e Nine, DFZ

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    7,777
    Likes Received:
    6,552
    Not sure that it's that big of a deal. I mean, probably don't leave it sitting out in direct sun at 100 degrees for 12 hours, but better that than in a trunk of a car. Typically you want your guitar out in the room or environment you're playing in for an hour or 2 so it acclimates. Tune, play a bit, check tuning. I honestly haven't had any issues with any PRS in this regard. If a guitar is well built, you shouldn't have any major issues. They're less delicate than one thinks.
     
    #5 vchizzle, Aug 17, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013
  6. dogrocketp

    dogrocketp I drank the PRS kool aid, and it was tasty!

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2013
    Messages:
    3,813
    Likes Received:
    5,986
    Personally, I play a plywood arch top in extreme conditions when I'm playing jazz, and either a Mahogany or Korina SE when it's an electric gig. My theory is that if it's not my best guitar, I won't go crazy. Also, the guitars I mentioned all have a thick polyester finish that seems to hold up better in bad weather. A laminated neck seems to be more stable as well.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice