Help With a 1991 PRS Custom 24

Discussion in 'Electric Instruments' started by Don, Aug 31, 2016.

  1. Don

    Don New Member

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    Hello all,

    I'm new to this forum and have been a Gibson user for many, many years, now interested in finally playing a better made guitar - a PRS.

    I've found a guitar that the owner says is a 1991 Custom 24 with a Brazilian rosewood fretboard. S/N is 111167. From what I can gather, it appears to be all original.

    Can anyone tell me about these early guitars that were made at the original Annapolis shop? And how do they compare with the PRS Custom 24 models that are built today? Did the trem stay in tune well? Is that sweet switch difficult to use? And I see that the top tuners seem to have been modified to fit the headstock. Was that common back then? Approximate value for this instrument?

    Any and all information would be greatfully appreciated.

    Thank you.

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  2. Don

    Don New Member

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    Anyone?
     
  3. jay

    jay Happy Member

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    I'm pretty sure it stays in tune well. Compared to the ones produced today, the tuners, the pickups, the finish and the p.u. switching systems are different. I can't tell what does this mean in terms of sound.
    About the tuners, why are you saying that they have been modified?
     
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  4. Don

    Don New Member

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    By modified, I meant, that if you look at the photo of the back of the headstock, it appears that the mounting hole on the top 2 tuners had to be cut in order to fit on the headstock using just one screw. When I look at newer models, it appears that the headstocks are now wider.
     
  5. brado

    brado New Member

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    Tuners look normal, but it looks like your guitar does not have a sweet switch. Sweet switches were replaced by tone controls in late 1991, but could be ordered that way as an option prior to that. Also, your guitar will have the small neck heel which some say is desirable to the large heel which was introduced on custom 24's in 1993. As far as value, I think not having the sweet switch lowers the value, and it does not look like a 10 top. In todays market, around $2,000. max. If it is a 10 top, there will be a 10 impressed in the headstock next to the serial number.
     
    #5 brado, Aug 31, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
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  6. jay

    jay Happy Member

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    Yeah, tuners were simply made in that way and the top two ones were fixed with just one screw. Headstock is similar but present tuners are fixed differently and they don't touch each other.
     
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  7. Don

    Don New Member

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    Is that 3rd knob a pickup selector?
     
  8. brado

    brado New Member

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    Yes , it should be a 5 way rotary selector.
     
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  9. Don

    Don New Member

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    Any idea what pickups these would have been?
     
  10. brado

    brado New Member

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    Early 1991 - Standard Bass, Standard Treble, Late 1991 - HFS treble, Vintage Bass
     
    Don likes this.
  11. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc Get in, loser, we’re going shopping.

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    Bangin'! That's a cool guitar.
     
  12. JoeDirt

    JoeDirt New Member

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    Very good looking guitar. Love that finish, wonder what is the name of the finish?
     
  13. brado

    brado New Member

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    That's probably Scarlet Sunburst
     
  14. dogrocketp

    dogrocketp I drank the PRS kool aid, and it was tasty!

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    The changes made to PRSi through the years are considered by many to be improvements. I believe that you buy what you like based on sound, weight, and feel. My 2003 CE24 has supposedly been improved many times since then. I don`t care. The one I have is beautiful and sounds fantastic. It doesn`t mean I won`t buy a newer one if the opportunity (and money) arrive at the same time. I love the one I`ve got. That`s the goal, in my book.
     
  15. BMiller

    BMiller New Member

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    Funny....I was asking the similar questions when I snagged my '91 CU24! Mine has the sweet switch, birds (optional at that time) and gold hardware (optional as well). My pickups are labelled Hot Vintage Treble and Vintage Bass (another option?)

    For the tuners, PRS ground off the ears on the top tuners so that they could be installed with one securing screw. This is normal for that era. We can go back and forth on the trem and how it compares to later eras, but that is a Mannmade Millcom one piece (or should be!). Very high quality trem....and I have no issues with tuning stability. I mean, drop the arm down to where the strings are flopping all over the pickups and the bring it back up....still in tune. Compared to the Core CU24s made today, well I can only compare it with the two Anniversary CU24s that a buddy has, we are talking higher end guitars. Despite differences in pickups, neck carves, and woods (Brazzy fretboard man!), they all compare equally and are down right amazing compared to the many others I have owned over the years.

    For value, an above poster was pretty on the mark. The lack of the Sweet Switch makes it a more "common" guitar. Also, it doesn't appear to be a 10 top. Suggestion though, under good light, look at the back of the headstock and look to the upper right of the serial number. If it is a 10 Top, you should see the 10 stamped in the finish. When I found mine, the retailer didn't pay much attention and did not see the 10 thereby reducing the price. As a 10 it is worth more on the open market (although I think that the 10 top really only contributes to the visual and not the tone). You can send PRS support the serial numbers and detailed pictures of the guitar and they can tell you quite a bit about what you have. The inside of the pickup cavity's contain a lot of information!

    None the less, it is an awesome instrument and appears to be super clean! Play it, love it, live it!!
     
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  16. WiredGuitarist

    WiredGuitarist Authorized PRS dealer
    Authorized PRS Dealer

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    There is no difference in quality between older and newer PRS in my experience. PRS is well-known for being one of the only guitar manufacturers able to consistently put out amazing guitars. There has never been a real "dark" period for PRS unlike Fender/Gibson.
     
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  17. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    Agreed, but PRS has only had one guy at the helm. The true test will be when someone else takes over the decision making process. Will the next guy be a CBS or a PRS(H)?
     
  18. WiredGuitarist

    WiredGuitarist Authorized PRS dealer
    Authorized PRS Dealer

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    Good point. With that said, Paul seems like a true entrepreneur versus someone like Leo who was more of an engineer type. I think Paul has done a great job managing the business itself and hiring good people too. Everyone I've talked to working at PRS is very competent. In fact, I even stole the dealer system from Jim at PRS and implemented it into my men's hair product company because it was so well done.
     
  19. Don

    Don New Member

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    Thanks everyone for your responses.
     

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