Help- not bonding with my Core Paul’s Guitar

Well i can relate to the OP's situation since i have the same issue with my Brent Mason. It's more complicated than just turning the tone down. I love my BM but i can't use it on every amp, but I definitely use the 'hi-fi" tone as an advantage sometimes. I'd imagine that if I only had that one guitar, eeesh....but...that's why you don't keep only one.

I mean no offense, but please understand that my point was to not overthink things. Many times it really is simple. And built into the design of the instrument itself. The OP stated that the frequencies on his new guitar seemed too bright, and there's a built-in cure for that right inside the guitar - the tone knob. It seems silly to me that people don't use it more.

FWIW, I've got a lot of guitars, too, some for practical reasons, some for sentimental reasons, and some for the sheer hell of it. But on all of them I'm aware of the range of tones/sounds I can get from them and know how to tweak my playing or how to use the instrument differently to get the sounds I want.

OP - apart from using what's already there to control the tone, there are also a ton of tweaks and mods that can be made to alter the guitar's overall sound - thicker picks, picks with rounded edges, picks made of softer materials, thicker strings, changing from steel core to nickel-based strings, lowering the pickup height, changing the bridge saddle material, changing the way you actually fret your notes, changing capacitors on volume/tone pots, lowering the treble / presence on an amp, using longer instrument cables with a lot of resistance... all of those things can lessen the brightness of a guitar with little or no cost.

And don't get me started on the importance of using the volume knob... :cool:
 
No offense taken. Good discussion!

I think that a pickup's properties are a pickups properties...and the tone knob just give some adjustment to those properties. My Brent mason's issue would not be solved with the tone knob, no matter where it is set it still has my BM's flavor overall.


I mean no offense, but please understand that my point was to not overthink things. Many times it really is simple. And built into the design of the instrument itself. The OP stated that the frequencies on his new guitar seemed too bright, and there's a built-in cure for that right inside the guitar - the tone knob. It seems silly to me that people don't use it more.

FWIW, I've got a lot of guitars, too, some for practical reasons, some for sentimental reasons, and some for the sheer hell of it. But on all of them I'm aware of the range of tones/sounds I can get from them and know how to tweak my playing or how to use the instrument differently to get the sounds I want.

OP - apart from using what's already there to control the tone, there are also a ton of tweaks and mods that can be made to alter the guitar's overall sound - thicker picks, picks with rounded edges, picks made of softer materials, thicker strings, changing from steel core to nickel-based strings, lowering the pickup height, changing the bridge saddle material, changing the way you actually fret your notes, changing capacitors on volume/tone pots, lowering the treble / presence on an amp, using longer instrument cables with a lot of resistance... all of those things can lessen the brightness of a guitar with little or no cost.

And don't get me started on the importance of using the volume knob... :cool:
 
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Hey GJ .. Can you post a pic of your BM harness (I have failed in the post pic ability test) so that the learned folk here can let me know which lead to unsolder ?

cheers Wailing

Pics posted and I pointed out the cap on the volume pot that was mentioned. I probably won't touch mine since I have the other solution to the problem...actually the solution to a lot of problems...more PRS guitars.
 
Are you already using pure nickel strings? If not, give them a whirl.
That is an easy thing to try. I think it is interesting that so many string sets are marketed as helping bring out the highs. I am always looking for a mellow tone. Maybe I should throw a set of flat wound strings on and see what happens.
 
Another approach might be to change the values of the volume and tone pots. Fender generally went for 250K for single coil guitars, Gibson for 500K for their HB loaded guitars. The higher the value, the wider the high frequency band that is retained in the pickups’ tone. I don’t know what value comes stock in the Paul’s, it should be marked on the back of the pot body. If you’re up for the challenge, you can do 2 things: replace the volume pot with an even lower value (replace a 250K with a 100K), or 2) solder a resistor of a calculated value across a 500K pots inner and outer lugs to fine tune to a desired target using a parallel resistor calculator (i.e. a 300K across a 500K pot will “make” a 188K pot). Or you could just use an EQ pedal. Or find the guitar that suits you better.
 
There's a couple of videos of my guitar up on YouTube. One with the treble bleed cap connected and several after I'd disconnected it. Now I know these samples are through different amps, and played by different people, but I think these videos do give an impression of its before and after sound.

As new with the treble bleed connected

Recently with the treble bleed disconnected

And here from 6'42"
 
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OP here with an update. I got my hands on a 594 so that I could compare it to my Paul’s Guitar. The 594 is fantastic but it gave me a new appreciation for and way to view the Paul’s Guitar.


The Paul’s Guitar’s neck is a little smaller than the 594, but it’s perfect and feels like home. The neck pickup on the Paul’s Guitar is a little brighter and a little less muddy than the 594. The bridge pickup on the 594 has more balls and is a great pickup. At first I liked it better. But then I raised the pickup height on the Paul’s and it came back to life and was just as good. I like the toggle switches on the Paul’s better than the push pull pots in the PRS. The split tones are a wash between the guitars. The 594 is about 0.5 lbs heavier.


Ultimately, there’s something special about the Paul’s that adds something unique to my collection. The 594 is great but doesn’t do anything an LP or SG don’t do, other than the splits. I’d miss the Paul’s if I sold it, not sure I’d miss the 594.

Ultimately I realized that the Paul’s Guitar is its own thing and shouldn’t be compared to my other humbucker guitars. It’s more Tele-like than LP-like, or maybe leans more P90 than humbucker, if that makes sense.

I haven’t messed with clipping the treble bleed and may try that soon. But I have started to bond with it once I saw it through a different light.
 
That's great feedback.
Yes it's a mistake to try and think of the Paul's guitar in terms of a Les Paul, there's just too many differences. And certainly thinking in terms of a P90 might help.

I wouldn't clip the treble bleed cap if you do decided to go down that route, but rather just de-solder one side - much easier to put back to normal that way. Of course this does a assume you have the equipment to do this.

Did you watch the videos I posted just above your comment? I think these do reflect my experience of the sound before and after modifying my guitar. Just generally warning up the sound a bit and removing some top end presence
 
OP here with an update. I got my hands on a 594 so that I could compare it to my Paul’s Guitar. The 594 is fantastic but it gave me a new appreciation for and way to view the Paul’s Guitar.


The Paul’s Guitar’s neck is a little smaller than the 594, but it’s perfect and feels like home. The neck pickup on the Paul’s Guitar is a little brighter and a little less muddy than the 594. The bridge pickup on the 594 has more balls and is a great pickup. At first I liked it better. But then I raised the pickup height on the Paul’s and it came back to life and was just as good. I like the toggle switches on the Paul’s better than the push pull pots in the PRS. The split tones are a wash between the guitars. The 594 is about 0.5 lbs heavier.


Ultimately, there’s something special about the Paul’s that adds something unique to my collection. The 594 is great but doesn’t do anything an LP or SG don’t do, other than the splits. I’d miss the Paul’s if I sold it, not sure I’d miss the 594.

Ultimately I realized that the Paul’s Guitar is its own thing and shouldn’t be compared to my other humbucker guitars. It’s more Tele-like than LP-like, or maybe leans more P90 than humbucker, if that makes sense.

I haven’t messed with clipping the treble bleed and may try that soon. But I have started to bond with it once I saw it through a different light.

I find the PG narrowfield pickups that I have on a PS model (pre TCI) to be great because they eliminate mud in a recording. They also have a beautiful shimmer, drive a good amp very nicely, and the guitar has paid for itself in session fees, as well as demo tracks that got me some nice ad projects.

So I record with it quite a lot. I have other PRSes as well, and love them, but won't be without that guitar as it's SO useful!

I'm also big on using the tone controls on all of my guitars.
 
That's great feedback.
Yes it's a mistake to try and think of the Paul's guitar in terms of a Les Paul, there's just too many differences. And certainly thinking in terms of a P90 might help.

I wouldn't clip the treble bleed cap if you do decided to go down that route, but rather just de-solder one side - much easier to put back to normal that way. Of course this does a assume you have the equipment to do this.

Did you watch the videos I posted just above your comment? I think these do reflect my experience of the sound before and after modifying my guitar. Just generally warning up the sound a bit and removing some top end presence


Thanks Tone-y, yes I watched your videos and the change from removing the treble bleed seems very subtle. I do intend to try it.


One negative to the Paul's that I should point out that does bother me is the pickups are very noisy, better in humbucker mode rather than split, but still noisy nonetheless. It's a single coil type of hum that can be eliminated by turning 90 degrees, but I find myself annoyed by it and wishing it were quieter. I don't expect humbuckers to be noisy.
 
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One negative to the Paul's that I should point out that does bother me is the pickups are very noisy, better in humbucker mode rather than split, but still noisy nonetheless. It's a single coil type of hum that can be eliminated by turning 90 degrees, but I find myself annoyed by it and wishing it were quieter. I don't expect humbuckers to be noisy.

Well of course in single coil mode they are in fact, 'single coils!'. I think on normal PRS humbucker pickups, when put in single coil mode they have a resistor connected that brings in some of the signal of the turned off coil, so I'm fact you never have just a single coil on (they do this to stop the big drop in volume level with just one coil on) and there is a degree of noise cancelling still.

With the Paul's guitar (and others with pickups like the 58/15 multi tap) in single coil mode you are getting truly just a single coil - the volume difference is compensated by extra windings being engaged on the coil. This does of course mean you are subject to the same issues that single coils have
 
Pickups height make a huge difference. I recently received a Paul's 85 that sounded way louder and warmer than my Core Paul's Guitar; it also plays like butter though the PG felt very good 'as is' (good enough I was waiting for the neck string change to set it up).
Looking more closely at the two the P85 was setup perfectly (as you'd hope for a PS) and the pickups were way closer to the strings as a result. Once that setup was replicated on the Paul's Guitar the two became quite similar sounding, as much as they could given the fairly drastic difference in natural/acoustic tone of the two.

For reference the setup of the Paul's 85 is:
- Action with 1st fret pressed (and neck relief already adjusted): 4.5/64" at 17th fret on both e and E strings
- Pickup height with 1st fret pressed (with above action):
Neck: 8.5/64" for E, 9/64" for e
Bridge: 5/64" on both e and E
 
Well of course in single coil mode they are in fact, 'single coils!'. I think on normal PRS humbucker pickups, when put in single coil mode they have a resistor connected that brings in some of the signal of the turned off coil, so I'm fact you never have just a single coil on (they do this to stop the big drop in volume level with just one coil on) and there is a degree of noise cancelling still.

With the Paul's guitar (and others with pickups like the 58/15 multi tap) in single coil mode you are getting truly just a single coil - the volume difference is compensated by extra windings being engaged on the coil. This does of course mean you are subject to the same issues that single coils have

thanks, just to be clear, I expect noise in single coil mode, I am experiencing single coil type noise when in humbucker mode.
 
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