HELP 2/vol 2/tone

Andrew Paul

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I posted my recent purchase Stripped 58. First time since the 90s I’ve had a Les Paul style with two volumes and two tones. (Did own 594 for a very short time). Perhaps I’m ignorant or just don’t remember but what’s the purpose of two volumes? I assumed that with the pickup selector selected in the middle with both pickups on you could blend the volume of each pickup but with this guitar it doesn’t work that way. This guitar with selector in the middle the volume of either pickup effects the overall volume. In other words if I happen to turn the Bridge pickup volume all the way down with both selected the neck pickup is also affected and you can’t hear it. Maybe a better way to explain is when both pickups are selected turning down either volume all the way acts like one volume control for both. Is this the way it supposed to work? I looked at the control cavity it’s all original factory wiring.

Thanks
 

ViperDoc

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The knobs will function according to their wiring. In the middle position, both volume pots’ ground connections are in the circuit, so either will cancel the signal if turned down. Then there’s the “channel switching” option as above, it’s very useful live. You can get tones on a 4 knob setup that you can’t get with a single volume control.
 

RickP

Established 1960, Still Not Dead
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Volume swells, kind of a pseudo-violin sound, are really effective with this layout. Bridge pot all the way up, neck pot at zero, pick the note then roll up the neck volume. Because the bridge pickup then come on full, you get the attack-less note without having to roll the neck knob all the way to 10.

A real inspiration to me, Phil Keaggy, uses this technique to great effect on several recordings. He demonstrates it in this video from the 80s. Although the whole thing is worth the watch, he discusses this subject from about 44:00 in on the video.

Keaggy Video
 

Andrew Paul

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The knobs will function according to their wiring. In the middle position, both volume pots’ ground connections are in the circuit, so either will cancel the signal if turned down. Then there’s the “channel switching” option as above, it’s very useful live. You can get tones on a 4 knob setup that you can’t get with a single volume control.
Thanks Doc
 

Andrew Paul

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Joined
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Volume swells, kind of a pseudo-violin sound, are really effective with this layout. Bridge pot all the way up, neck pot at zero, pick the note then roll up the neck volume. Because the bridge pickup then come on full, you get the attack-less note without having to roll the neck knob all the way to 10.

A real inspiration to me, Phil Keaggy, uses this technique to great effect on several recordings. He demonstrates it in this video from the 80s. Although the whole thing is worth the watch, he discusses this subject from about 44:00 in on the video.

Keaggy Video
Wow… Phil Keaggy, that’s a name I haven’t heard in years. I saw him live when I was in high school. It was at Kings college when there was a campus in Briarcliff NY, he was so impressive! I bought his album, Town to town I think that was the name of it I remember there was a song called town to town on it. Good song. I will watch the video thank you so much and now I’m sure I’ll be searching him on YouTube watching other concert videos. Thank you so much!
 

RickP

Established 1960, Still Not Dead
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Wow… Phil Keaggy, that’s a name I haven’t heard in years. I saw him live when I was in high school. It was at Kings college when there was a campus in Briarcliff NY, he was so impressive! I bought his album, Town to town I think that was the name of it I remember there was a song called town to town on it. Good song. I will watch the video thank you so much and now I’m sure I’ll be searching him on YouTube watching other concert videos. Thank you so much!
Just love the guy. I’ve seen him many times since the 70s, and have most of his albums (many re-bought on CD, now recorded to digital). I met him years and years ago at a gig he was playing in Angleton, Texas and he was such a unassuming and humble man. After a killer set, while shaking his hand I said “I hope some of that playing rubs off” and he laughed, saying “brother, if it’ll come off you’re welcome to it!”

Town to Town, Play Thru Me, Phil’p Side, The Wind and The Wheat still see regular rotation in my music players. His earlier stuff also brings back a lot of great teen memories. “Time” and “Just The Same” were early faves.

Phil and Dana Key from the DeGarmo & Key Band are two guitarists I always enjoyed in this genre.
 

Andrew Paul

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
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Just love the guy. I’ve seen him many times since the 70s, and have most of his albums (many re-bought on CD, now recorded to digital). I met him years and years ago at a gig he was playing in Angleton, Texas and he was such a unassuming and humble man. After a killer set, while shaking his hand I said “I hope some of that playing rubs off” and he laughed, saying “brother, if it’ll come off you’re welcome to it!”

Town to Town, Play Thru Me, Phil’p Side, The Wind and The Wheat still see regular rotation in my music players. His earlier stuff also brings back a lot of great teen memories. “Time” and “Just The Same” were early faves.

Phil and Dana Key from the DeGarmo & Key Band are two guitarists I always enjoyed in this genre.
Thanks for sending me a list of other songs I’ll be listening to them tonight!
 

Andrew Paul

The cat's meow
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
2,093
Location
New York
Volume swells, kind of a pseudo-violin sound, are really effective with this layout. Bridge pot all the way up, neck pot at zero, pick the note then roll up the neck volume. Because the bridge pickup then come on full, you get the attack-less note without having to roll the neck knob all the way to 10.

A real inspiration to me, Phil Keaggy, uses this technique to great effect on several recordings. He demonstrates it in this video from the 80s. Although the whole thing is worth the watch, he discusses this subject from about 44:00 in on the video.

Keaggy Video
Rick, Thanks again for sharing that video. he truly is an amazing guitarist. On a different note... it was like going back in a time machine looking at that pedal board, rack effects, A/B switches, Roland switch pedals..... how I forgot about all we used to go through to achieve a variety of switchable sounds that we take for granted now. I wish I had then what I have now. One thing I will be doing... I'll be buying and experimenting with an E-Bow. ;):cool:
 

RickP

Established 1960, Still Not Dead
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Gulf Coast of Texas
Rick, Thanks again for sharing that video. he truly is an amazing guitarist. On a different note... it was like going back in a time machine looking at that pedal board, rack effects, A/B switches, Roland switch pedals..... how I forgot about all we used to go through to achieve a variety of switchable sounds that we take for granted now. I wish I had then what I have now. One thing I will be doing... I'll be buying and experimenting with an E-Bow. ;):cool:
Phil inspired me to get one back when, and it was lots of fun! I never was as musical as he is with it, but made some great noise.

He’s got quite a few acoustic records as well. If you get a chance, look up a live version of him doing Salvation Army Band. Looper craziness, and getting the most out of that awesome Olson acoustic.

On the equipment… he was one of the first using a non-tube pre, but ran it into that Mesa 295 into Thiele cabs. What a great sound! Of course, when you can play like that it makes almost anything sound incredible.
 
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