Heavier Gauge String differences

Discussion in 'Electric Instruments' started by Jock68, May 30, 2020.

  1. Jock68

    Jock68 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2014
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    13
    New HB ll, Is it my imagination or do you need to hit them harder than a lighter gauge string? I also feel that i need to build up more strength in my fingers. Is this a first day thing, and I will not notice tomorrow, or is it something that you need to learn and adapt to ?
     
  2. jak3af3r

    jak3af3r Slightly Older Than New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2018
    Messages:
    441
    Likes Received:
    997
    First question, I don't know for sure.

    About the strength, yes you'll need more if you're trying to play the same way. If you didn't set your guitar up after you put the heavier strings on, that could contribute to it feeling more difficult to play as the higher tension strings may pull the neck more and raise the action.

    On a side note, heavier strings allow for slightly lower action because the arc they make when vibrating is a little smaller. If you ever get the chance to play some jazz-cat's guitar that's well we'll set up with super heavy strings, you'd be surprised how easily they play.
     
    dogrocketp, LEscanilla and RickP like this.
  3. colinkanders

    colinkanders Compulsive Noodler

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2017
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    73
    I have different gauges on different guitars and it takes a few minutes of playing to get my hands/fingers to adjust when switching between them. If you're completely new to the heavier gauge, your hands/fingers will need to learn how to work with it but that should only take a couple days.
     
    dogrocketp, LEscanilla and RickP like this.
  4. LEscanilla

    LEscanilla I hear dead people

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    65
    I don’t remember if I had to pick heavy strings any harder but it was an adjustment in feel.

    It would probably depend on what you’re used to. If you’re changing from.008’s to .012‘a you may feel you have to fret harder. If you going from .010’s to .011’s, not so much. As was mentioned, it helps to lower the action.

    If you play a lot I would assume it might be a first day thing. You’ll learn to adapt. I have .009’s on my electrics and .011’s on my acoustics. If I don’t play acoustics for a while it still takes a few minutes to get used to.
     
  5. iLookLikeElvis

    iLookLikeElvis New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2019
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    388
    Agree with the above - you'll adapt pretty quickly. I have 11s on my 594 and 10s on my Strat - the difference isn't stark (perhaps down to different scale lengths) but I feel like the 593 with the 11s is easier to control, e.g. less tendency to over-bend or pull too hard on strings when chording. I do tend to have a bit of a heavy hand though.
     
  6. Jock68

    Jock68 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2014
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    13
    Cheer for the feedback, love the guitar, just need to get it to love me and make me sound good.
     
    dogrocketp likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice