Gibson conversation

tbp0701

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My dad has a 1965 B25 acoustic he bought in a pawn shop in the 1970s. It's a good example of how sloppy Gibson could be at the time, with large gobs of glue in the bracing, and a thick top that is a bowed between the soundhole and bridge. Yet it is very fun to play. (It also evidently once belonged to a nun, as the back of the headstock had a labelmaker sticker).

I've convinced myself to get a 335 or Les Paul on a few occasions, but I've yet to buy one. I tried out several, but the ones I liked were more than I could justify spending. A couple 335s did come close, though.

Maybe it's a good thing, as I thought I'd take care of both my LP and 335-itch for a reasonable price when I bought a '95 Hamer Artist Studio. I've never quite taken to it, however. Maybe as its my only short-scale guitar, or some painful memories of things that happened around the time I bought it. Whatever the case, I never play it for very long.

Anyway, as for Gibson, the company has gone through a lot of leadership changes, crises, and assorted other problems (like delving into consumer electronics when the market is becoming increasingly commoditized), but through it all its continued to make (and presumably sell) hundreds of guitars every day. I've read over 500? Thinking of how many Gibsons have been built during my lifetime is a bit astonishing.
 

Rider1260

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andy474x

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The regular production Gibson and even Epiphone stuff I’ve played in the last year or so has actually been pretty good, and I say that as someone who tried to buy an LP on and off for a couple years and had a lot of problems with their QC. Of things made during the Henry years, the only great Gibsons I played were a Bill Kelliher Explorer (and it was GREAT), and last year I let a used CS 339 slip through my fingers, and shouldn’t have, it smoked.

Still would like to get my hands on a good 335 or 339. They have a sound that isn’t recreated in the PRS lineup, IMO.

All that being said, the thing that hurt Gibson wasn’t PRS... it was Gibson.
 

dogrocketp

I drank the PRS kool aid, and it was tasty!
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Andy, I’d recommend you try the core and SE Hollowbodies. I found that I prefer a 25” scale. I had a pre-Gibson Riviera, an old 330 in high school, and a Casino about 20 years ago. All nice, but my SE Hollowbody piezo actually has a better sound to me. It sings, but with greater clarity than the others.
 

Austin_Taunt

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I’ve had great luck with the Gibson Les Paul Classic. 3 out of 4 I have owned has been keepers. The fourth had P90s and was the only reason I let it go. The one I have now is a 2019 and is the most resonant Les Paul ive ever played. It’s an amazing guitar I’ve now begun modding for me. Installed Grover locking tuners and Suhr Thornbuckers. About to change out the harness and considering putting on a Faber bridge master kit with the hybrid saddles. Funny thing is I used to think the same thing about PRS. Could not find a good one for me until I found my current 513. I love the 513. Actually, my main three electrics I absolutely love and all could be my #1(third is an Anderson Tele) Took a lot of searching to find the lineup but I’m a believer in all three brands I play.
 

Tony M.

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Steve said,

"And while Gibson has nowhere near the choices of great wood offered by PRS, every once in awhile even the blind sow finds an acorn (I’ve been lucky enough to find a few)."

Tony M. agrees with Steve.
Sometimes Gibson gets it very right indeed.


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Texsunburst59

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Feb 14, 2013
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And this is the beast. While Gibson has nowhere near the choices of great wood offered by PRS, every once in awhile even the blind sow finds an acorn (I’ve been lucky enough to find a few).






That's a beauty 11.

VERY NICE!!!!
 

RevBillyG

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I wouldn't call myself a Gibson guy. But when I want a Les Paul, only a Les Paul would do. I've got three Les Pauls, two copies & a flying V.

I don't think I'll ever be a one brand guy. I love all my guitars. PRS, Fender, Dean, BCRich... one day I'll even buy an Ibanez
 

AP515

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I don't think I'll ever be a one brand guy.

Who ever said we had to be? If you find a guitar that pushes your buttons, get it! It's simply been my experience that the ones that do the most button pushing have had PRS on the headstock. But I've got others that I don't intend to sell.
 

tbp0701

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I wouldn't call myself a Gibson guy. But when I want a Les Paul, only a Les Paul would do. I've got three Les Pauls, two copies & a flying V.

I don't think I'll ever be a one brand guy. I love all my guitars. PRS, Fender, Dean, BCRich... one day I'll even buy an Ibanez

Who ever said we had to be? If you find a guitar that pushes your buttons, get it! It's simply been my experience that the ones that do the most button pushing have had PRS on the headstock. But I've got others that I don't intend to sell.

I also like having several brands, as there's so much to experience. Of the seven times I've bought a guitar I've only repeated a brand once, but they were made in different places. (Fender, Martin, Fender (Japan), Hamer, Collings (acoustic), G&L, PRS). And I've learned a lot about what I like, especially as my playing developed.

While I play them all the PRS and Collings have me lose track of time and just keep playing. So I occasionally entertain thoughts of selling others and getting a second PRS. (Probably not a Collings as the entire line has gotten so expensive).

Or go ahead and find a 335, as when I was a kid playing air-guitar, that's the model I envisioned.
 
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