DGT Electronics

tommytone32

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I am really excited about getting a PRS DGT. I have two options, A 2011 model or a newer 2015 model. I was wondering if anyone knows of any significant differences between the different years and if any major changes took place between 2011 and 2015 in the design of the electronics, i.e., 2011 vs 2015 models. I am about to pull the trigger but was wondering if there exist any major opinions between the two specific years designs..
This is my first post so I hope these questions are within proper protocol....................
 

jfb

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Welcome to the forums. Perfectly reasonably question. I do not know the answer, but I am certain someone here does. I am unaware of any changes to the electronics at this time. The DGT is a beast of a guitar. Mine is from 2010 and I love it.
 

John Beef

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I think it was 2011 that they made the switch from nitro to the newer V12 finishes. So, the '11 could be either one.

In 2012 they started putting resistors on the split coil switches. So, the '11 won't have that but it's an easy and cheap addition.

Otherwise they should be pretty close.
 

Ralphinator85

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My 2011 DGT has the more recent resistor update. Verified it with the wiring diagram on this site. I wonder how the older electronics sound?
 

tommytone32

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Thanks so much for the input. So, would that make less noise in switching between splitting coils and not splitting ? Or just make the split more "electronically efficient" ?
Either way, sounds like it can be done by the player, or is there soldering involved ?
 

hackenfort

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I'm curious about this too. I haven't looked at the diagram, only because I don't know where to find it. What do the resistors do? I know Gibson (les paul) put a cap on the single coil side to reduce hum, that just kills the single coil sound.
 

John Beef

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Say you have a pickup that measures 9,000 ohms (9k). You split it, you get a 4.5K single coil. If you add on a resistor, it lets some of the second coil through so you get something more in the 6 to 6.5K range. Beefier sounding, less volume drop, less hum, and IMHO a heck of a lot more like a true single coil.

Yes, it can be done by the player, and yes, soldering is involved.
 

phillybri

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I'm of the mindset that newer is better. The tweaks and improvements that PRS has made from 2011 to 2015 only serve to make the newer guitar better, IMHO.
 

tommytone32

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FYI; The PRS tech guy told me yesterday that it's just as you mentioned. The only down side without the resistor upgrade is the signal loss drop. I have experienced that (signal loss) before with other switching effects and if it's noticeable at all, it's really a moment killer.....
I'm gonna go ahead pull the trigger on the 2011 DGT and get the upgrade done. It's a gorgeous looking and sounding piece and the upgrade can be done right here in my town in Oregon. Thanks for all the help with your responses.. :)
 

Boogie

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The resistor selection is perfect and the signal drop is no more or less than any other hummer being split. I love it and think you will too.
 
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LSchefman

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I'm of the mindset that newer is better. The tweaks and improvements that PRS has made from 2011 to 2015 only serve to make the newer guitar better, IMHO.

Aw come on, we all know that "pre-this or that" is always better in the world of guitars! Haha!

;)

Actually, I agree that they're always improving things at PRS. But the individual instrument always trumps everything.
 

Lkdog

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Does anybody have the part specs and pics of where to insert and solder the resistor?
I just picked up an 09 DGT, and really like the split tones.
I actually think the volume dropoff is not an issue.
Best split tones I have ever had on a humbucker guitar.

It seems to me they are tapped, not split and already keep more than half of the humbucker output.

Does the resistor change that even more??
 

Mixstar

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Generally, for the bridge, you'd use a 1.1K and for the neck a 2.2K and they're soldered in series with the switched ground. But . . . try it without first, if it works, leave it at alone. I added the hotrodded Seymour Duncans to my Tremonti SE (they're fantastic BTW and were just fine as they arrived with me) and coil split them by grounding the centre tap. Afterwards, being a bit of an experimenter, I thought I'd try the resistor trick and it made absolutely no difference so I took them out again.

 
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Lkdog

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Here's the official PRS schematic. Focus on the push-pull pot where the resistors are added when the pups are split. They are truly split, not tapped, and yes, the resistors filter off some of the harsh frequencies leaving the sweet-spot. We get to enjoy what took them years to refine.

Quick question on the mod. I picked up some resistors from Radio Shack.
Opened up my 2009 and compared it to the schematic you linked.

I do have the white pickup wires on the lower posts pair.
The middle posts pair are kind of pushed together and have a single ground wire connected to them which goes to the lower right post as in schematic which then has a ground wire to the Vol pot casing.
The top posts pair have nothing connected to them.

The middle post on bottom three tabs has the .022 cap going out to 3 way toggle.

Where should I solder the ends of the resistors??
Sorry if ignorant question.

Thanks!
 
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Boogie

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Just to make sure I'm following you, are we talking about the pickup switch or the coil split switch? Any chance of posting a pic?

The resistors are soldered to the coil split switch, which is integrated with the tone potentiometer. One end of the resistors is soldered to the center lugs of the switch...NOT soldered together...and the other soldered to the chassis ground of the switch. Anywhere on the metal case is fine. The white pup coil tap wires are soldered to the switch lugs closest to the tone pot.

if the middle two switch lugs are pushed together and soldered, you'll have to de-solder them and carefully pry them apart. Use care because they are easy to break off at this stage.

dgtswitch.jpg
 
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