Dead spot on 594, B string, 12th fret?

iLookLikeElvis

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Agree with you guys with each guitar needing what it needs to sound best in our own hands.

On some I like high action, others low. String gauge I'm not terribly sensitive to, but prefer heavier to lighter (at least 10s). Straps for some, others not (for sit down playing).
 

Dirty_Boogie

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Hi all,

Noticed last night that I have a dead spot on my new 594, B string at the 12th fret - the fretted note quickly decays/has little sustain. This also happens at the 11th fret to a lesser extent. I haven't really noticed it anywhere else on the fretboard.

When I place the headstock against a wall and fret the note, it rings much truer, suggesting this is a resonance issue (I guess). It also is alleviated if I tune the string higher.

I know this happens with guitars, but this location is pretty annoying. Any suggestions to minimize the impact in standard tuning? Would moving to heavier strings help (I use 10s, wouldn't mind 11s)? The intonation seems ok on the string as well, but I might try resetting it to make sure there's no quirk in the bridge saddle.

Thanks!

Justin
Have a dead spot on my McCarty (non-594) in the exact spot - 12th fret on B string. Decays super-quickly on a guitar that otherwise has wonderful sustain. No cure for it - it's just inherent to my guitar.
 

AP515

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Have a dead spot on my McCarty (non-594) in the exact spot - 12th fret on B string. Decays super-quickly on a guitar that otherwise has wonderful sustain. No cure for it - it's just inherent to my guitar.
You can move it one fret if you really need sustain on that fret. Add heavier or lighter tuner buttons and the dead spot will move up or down one fret. It is interesting that it's the 12th or 9th or 10th frets usually, and wolf tones are around the 7th fret. I have some ideas why. It's an interesting problem to contemplate.
 

Rider1260

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I have NEVER had a guitar that I could not get rid of " dead notes " on some guitars it has been more difficult , wider and or lower frets make some guitars more touchy IMHO.
The higher strings with their lower mass and then moving higher on the neck means there is less energy , less sustain.
On many 2 piece bridges ( not PRS yet ) I have had to raise the bridge , then slowly slot the saddle and or change the nut height to get the proper break angle on the strings to get them to ring out and still have great action.
My course of action on something like this is first figure how many fret range is this happening sometimes just a fret polish or dress on the offending fret is all it takes or a small tap of a fret hammer and in some cases its a pickup or pole piece being to high.
 

iLookLikeElvis

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So I slapped some heavier (11-49) strings on, raised the action (I like it a little high) with a small turn of truss rod and raised the bridge a hair, re-intonated.

Dead spot obviously still there but seems less noticeable. Gonna try to forget it now.

Guitar feels a lot better to me with the 11s though, like it's ready to be dug into.
 

Warmart

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Oh, any issues going to 11's? I have a feeling my soon to arrive 594 is going to spend some time at D standard. I'm sure I'll have to tweak the truss rod but has your nut and saddles agreed with the 11's?
 

LEscanilla

I hear dead people
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I have the same issue on the 14th fret on the G string. It rings for 2 seconds then dies. I’ve tried .08’s, .09’s and .10 gauge strings with no difference. Adding a weight made a slight difference but not enough to move the dead spot down a semitone. I’m leery about adjusting the truss rod because everything else is perfect. Disappointing to hear there’s no “cure”.
 

iLookLikeElvis

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When I was adjusting the truss rod I noticed the dead spot disappearing if I left the wrench attached to the truss rod screw. Dunno if that served to damped neck vibration via the rod itself or was just an effect of added mass. But was thinking of how I might add mass under the TRC somehow to achieve a more permanent effect. Like a small lead weight or something.

Dunno. Just thinking out loud...
 

DreamTheaterRules

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I’ve read (at The Gear Page, so it must be true) that ALL guitars have a dead spot somewhere. The theory was that you just find one that has that dead spot in a range you don’t live in, so yeah for me an octave fret would be a bad one.

I have not tested this idea thoroughly, and only seem to think about it when in fact I find a dead spot somewhere that I like to play.
 

iLookLikeElvis

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I’ve read (at The Gear Page, so it must be true) that ALL guitars have a dead spot somewhere. The theory was that you just find one that has that dead spot in a range you don’t live in, so yeah for me an octave fret would be a bad one.

I have not tested this idea thoroughly, and only seem to think about it when in fact I find a dead spot somewhere that I like to play.

This reminds me of Animal Farm: all frets are equal, but some are more equal than others...

Like why can't this thing show up on the A string at the 21st fret?!
 
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