CU24 has tight fret spacing. Would CU22 solve the my problem?

CalvinF

New Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
6
Dear PRS owners,

I have a CE24 with pattern thin neck and I love it. I am planning to get a CU24. However, I am noticing a slight discomfort when I am sitting down with CE24 and accessing the higher frets 20+.

When I am standing, my left hand can be angled perfectly perpendicular to the neck on 20+ frets. If my fingers are perpendicular to the neck, the surface area of my finger tips touching the fret board is exactly the size my finger tip.

When I am sitting, due to the 25'' scale length, my fingers are angled slightly. This is requiring a greater fret distance/area to avoid my fingers accidentally touching other strings on high frets. I am experiencing a similar problem on Les Paul. But LP is worse because of the chunky design near the neck/body joint.

This problem goes away with Strat. Although PRS has a Silver Sky, I don't like its fret board radius, I'd prefer something flat.

Do you think CU22 would address my problem? Alternatively I can just stand and play CU24 but that may be tiring for a 2 hours long practice session.

My only concern with CU22 is that it doesn't have a pattern thin profile.

Thank you
 

GuitarJammin

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Nov 14, 2015
Messages
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Location
Corpus Christi, TX
Fret spacing = scale length. That is why the problem goes away when you play on a strat. A strat has a 25.5" scale length vs the 25" on most but not all PRS guitars. The longer the scale length the more space between the frets.
 
Last edited:

GuitarJammin

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Nov 14, 2015
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Location
Corpus Christi, TX
https://reverb.com/item/10999695-prs-mark-tremonti-baritone-10-top-cherry-sunburst

This PRS tremonti is labeled a baritone due to it's 25.5" fret spacing. You can string it and tune it just like a regular guitar (most people use it for down tuning since longer scale length also adds string tension).

Also the SE Mark Holcomb is 25.5". Additionally older PRS bolt neck guitars are 25.25"...NF3, Brent mason, ect.

There may be more I'm not aware of, but these guitars will have more space between the frets.
 

alantig

Zombie Four, DFZ
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Apr 28, 2012
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When you’re sitting down, are you putting the guitar on your right leg? If so, try putting the guitar on your left leg so the lower bout is between your legs. This way, it’s a little more like where it is when you’re standing. If you can put it on a strap while you’re sitting, that can be even better. It’s an adjustment, to be sure, but it’s worth the effort.
 

Allstarrme

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Joined
Sep 16, 2019
Messages
26
The 513 & 509’s are 25.25” scale length as well But they do have a bit of a heel on the neck and they are pattern which isn’t as thin, or as wide as a pattern thin. Also only 22 frets.
 

Perry

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Sep 29, 2013
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Location
Hampshire, UK
This has me thinking. Standing or sitting, the frets on my CU24 never fall quite where I want them, even though this is my main gigging guitar and the one I have owned and played the most. The frets on my 22 fret 513, however, always seem to fall to hand perfectly. I have just measured both necks from the nut to the 22nd fret and the CU24 is 45.6cm, whereas the 513 is 46cm. The ergonomics of this is probably more to do with me (arm length/body width/hand size) than the guitars. For me, the 513 fits like a glove.
 

CalvinF

New Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2020
Messages
6
Thank you everyone for sharing your valuable experience with me. Looks like CU22 isn't going to help much. It seems to me that PRS discontinued 513 and Tremonti Baritone. But I can find a 509! It is a very attractive option. Also thanks for the suggesting the sitting posture, I have to try it for a bit. I have never put my guitar on the left leg (classical style) I need to dig a bit more into 509. But CU24 still got the look I like, that 35th Anniversary version with Aquamarine is just gorgeous...
 

Aahzz

Bluebeard Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2012
Messages
5,658
When you’re sitting down, are you putting the guitar on your right leg? If so, try putting the guitar on your left leg so the lower bout is between your legs. This way, it’s a little more like where it is when you’re standing. If you can put it on a strap while you’re sitting, that can be even better. It’s an adjustment, to be sure, but it’s worth the effort.

I always play with a strap, sitting or standing - I noticed very early on that keeping the guitar on my right knee as most players do just didn't work for me - it's always felt awkward. Using the strap keeps it in roughly the same position as standing and makes everything easier to reach.
 

shinksma

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Mar 20, 2014
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4,852
FWIW, and I know no-one asked, but:

I play standing 99% of the time. The only time I am sitting is when I am transcribing a new riff or song, and need to be able to scribble on a pad of paper or type into my computer.

I find sitting to be awkward, no matter which guitar - not just the high frets above 20, but the overall neck access seems weird. Cowboy chords are OK.
 

alantig

Zombie Four, DFZ
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
12,834
I always play with a strap, sitting or standing - I noticed very early on that keeping the guitar on my right knee as most players do just didn't work for me - it's always felt awkward. Using the strap keeps it in roughly the same position as standing and makes everything easier to reach.

Growing up, I played w/the guitar on my right leg. I know there are several pictures of that. But as I grew up - and more importantly, grew out, that became more problematic. A guy I took lessons from played sitting with a strap and said it helped him because it kept the guitar pretty much where it is when he stands.
 
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