Bucking the Trend: .008's

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by CandidPicker, Jul 8, 2021.

  1. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Energized

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    Gonna hazard to say that intonating a guitar is much like maintaining your car. You listen to the engine for unusual noises, add fluids, check the brakes, and of course, check the horn. There are other things, but this will suffice.

    Correct neck bow will prevent fret buzz and/or too-high action. Saddle adjustment will bring the string length correctly proportionate for 12-fret harmonics, and lastly, the pickup height tweak will be like increasing or decreasing the volume/tone of your horn. No one wants a little bicycle horn, or worse, foghorn, so correct adjustment is needed.

    Off to the "garage" for a bit. Will report back once some .008s have made their way onto my McCarty.
     
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  2. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Are we somehow brothers?

    You’re absolutely right, once again! For every Rick Beato video, there’s a Pedal Show video that “proves” that heavier strings have a different tone.

    Notice, I’m not saying ‘better’. The question isn’t better, it’s simply what works for each player.

    I have nerve issues in my hands, but I play .010s because on rhythm parts .009s and smaller feel like rubber bands and go out of pitch while strumming. I couldn’t play .008s without making a lot of stylistic changes to how I play.

    I also prefer the tone of heavier gauges. But that is just me talking about my personal choices. There is no right, there is no wrong!

    Hey, we are all different - thank goodness - and it’s every player for themselves.

    Seems to me that there should be no rules. Do what works!
     
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  3. Simon Says

    Simon Says New Member

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    I play 11's. 3rd year now. I was always 10-52 type of a guy. Since I tried Daddario 11-50 balanced set it all made sense to me. I'm applying same pressure to bends across all strings so my fretting hand is more relaxed. I'm downtuning to Eb with my main guitar and Db drop with my standard. I'm changing the .050 to .054 on this one. I don't see 11's as thick strings. 12's on acoustic is being seen as a light gauge, remember

    My point? There is no point - whatever makes you play better, man
     
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  4. andy474x

    andy474x Knows the Drill

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    This is exactly why I play 10’s for standard tuning, and really, probably why 9/10/11 sets are most popular in general. They strike a balance between easy to play and staying in tune when picked or strummed. My decision is about as simple as that!
     
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  5. Rider1260

    Rider1260 New Member

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    I grew up playing 11s ( Jazz Lights with a wound 3rd ) So I could play for a longer duration I switched to 10s and LOVED how they feel on my 25" scale guitars I have played lighter gauges and I just am to heavy handed lighter strings just feel like they are running away from me. I have gone to 9.5s on my Silver Skys ,
     
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  6. RickP

    RickP Established 1960, Still Not Dead

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    It’s possible. :)

    Might also be that we were both gigging decades before there was an internet to tell us what worked! We just had to actually use things and make up our own minds. Bizarre, right?

    Seriously, though, I love the access to info but do think folks rely too much on the opinions of people whose only credibility is that they’re famous for having opinions.
     
  7. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Energized

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    It really is a matter of preference, what works for you.

    That being said, I've discovered that .008s are somewhat brighter, more percussive and responsive to pick attack. If you fret too hard, there is a microtonal thing going on with the .008s. Kind of neat, though, useful for blues bends in minute amounts. Also much easier to do a whole-tone bend than compared to .010s, which I struggled with.

    Also, almost sounds compressed without actually using a compressor, strange to say. There is a matter of hatefulness as well. It is possible to be overly aggressive with these strings, and they require a lighter, more calculated touch. The impending learning curve may prove interesting in the next several weeks.

    I'll also likely stick to using .010s for my HBII Piezo for jazz and acoustic tones. The .008s do well with my Fractal presets, though the Fractal HBII preset I'd specifically reserve for the .010 gauge HBII.
     
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  8. vchizzle

    vchizzle Zomb!e Nine, DFZ

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    In the Beato vid they’re really all talking preferences of tone sitting in a mix. Really all that stuff can be changed in other ways in the mix. Engineers carve out/bump frequencies to fit the mix all the time. Boils down using what gauge makes you play the best. I like 10-52 in standard and drop D. I like more tension on my lower strings to keep my right hand picking at bay. I can be a little heavy handed sometimes. I never changed gauges because I thought it would sound better, always for the benefit of my playing. When I started playing in drop C, string gauge increased to keep myself from bending stuff out of tune. Personally, I like the beefier sound of heavier strings. At the same time, I’m a little less heavy handed now than 20 years ago. I can play 10’s in standard tuning just fine now, not so much when I was younger. If the time comes when my hands want something easier, I’m sure I’ll bump it down. Do what works for you.

    BTW, I don’t think the bulk of people here are modern rock/metal players. Let’s poll it…
     
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  9. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Energized

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    I think the .008s are quite flexible, though I think I like a little resistance under my hands. I might move up to .009s to compare against the .008s, but I think I'll try to acclimate to the .008s first. My primary issue is the bend-fatigue that occurs for blues and rock songs.

    The tone-related string thickness is not as important as how the strings feel under my hands; the .008s may be just a little too slinky/flexible for me to be useable.

    Will give 'em a few weeks, then possibly switch up to .009s.
     
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  10. LSchefman

    LSchefman Hears Tones

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    Wait, there was a time before internet??

    :eek:

    Haha! So freakin' true!
     
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  11. Em7

    Em7 deus ex machina

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    I do not know when PRS made the change to 10s, but PRS guitars shipped setup for 9s for a long time. My 1995 Standard 24 came from the factory with 9s.

    I always restring my PRS guitars with 9.5s (25.5" scale guitars get 9s), but I am thinking about going down to 9s. I used Ernie Ball Super Slinkies (9s) for a long time before switching to DR than D'Addario. To me, D'Addario strings are stiffer in any given gauge than Ernie Ball strings. In my humble opinion, the only thing that D'Addario strings have going for them is that they last longer than most other string brands. As most people know, PRS strings are just rebranded D'Addario.
     

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