"Blue Chip" picks for electric guitars...??

Boz

New Member
Joined
May 5, 2024
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78
Hey fellow PRS-ians,
Got a topic I've been wanting to throw out to the group. I received my dream Martin guitar recently, and since I got it, and even before I got it, I was doing my research of how to get the best sound of out the guitar. Everything from the pickups, to the amp, to the strings, all the way down to the pick I used. I figured when dropping as much as I did on that acoustic, you want to squeeze every beautiful note out of it that you can, and let me tell you, the hard work paid off. It's the most gorgeous sounding acoustic I've ever played, especially considering all the different choices I made regarding the previously mentioned options. They all were worth the research and investment. Even the pick, as I eluded to. Which brings me to this topic....
The Blue Chip pick for my Martin acoustic made a VERY noticeable difference in the feel, and especially the sound. As you can imagine, since the sound comes directly from the guitar itself, the softer sound the pick makes, results in a better sound from the guitar itself, without the metallic, or clickyness associated with a lot of picks. So the pick was worth every penny imo for this application.
Now I noticed that a lot of people even played Blue Chip picks with electric guitars too, and a lot of PRS owners to be specific, which initially surprised me. I always assumed that with electric guitars, the pick is more about the feel, than the sound it makes, since electric guitars make sound thru electrical amplification methods, which obviously differs from playing an acoustic guitar (unplugged of course). But even a lot of people that used them for electric guitars said that they felt there was a noticeable improvement in the sound with the Blue Chip pick, and now many of them made the change to BC picks for their electrics also. I personally have not had the chance to play a BC pick on an electric yet, so I was hoping to receive some feedback, preferably from anyone who has actually used them on electrics.
Does it make a noticeable difference? Do you feel the improved sound and/or feel is worth the price on an electric guitar? What specific benefits have you found? And for anyone that has played them on an electric that DIDNT think they were worth it, why do you feel that way? What about it did you specifically not like?
Even though they are expensive, I personally have no problem investing $35 on a pick if it's going to improve my feel, sound, tone, etc. Especially considering how long the picks last due to the material they are made of. I'm not someone that gigs all around and loses picks. In fact, I can't remember the last time I lost a pick. So please share your thoughts on the infamous Blue Chip pick for this application, I'm all ears
 
Blue Chip picks are all I use, acoustic or electric.

I like the tone, I like the feel, and they glide through the strings fast without getting hung up.

Try a few picks with your new guitar, you'll see they all elicit subtly different tones, unless you play with a lot of gain, in which case the subtlety will be mostly obscured and none of this matters.

I've been using them for 6-7 years, and I have yet to see any wear at all on one.

I like the feel and tone of picks like the Red Bear, but they do wear, and can't survive an accidental trip through the washing machine without turning into a potato chip.

Like you, I don't lose picks. I still have the Fender mandolin pick I used with my first Martin in 1971. Truth! Though it's worn out, I keep it around for sentimental purposes. 🤣
 
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I use Blue Chip and Red Bear on my electrics. Like them both. Pricey, but worth it.

If you don't mind me asking, what differences do you fins between the Blue Chip compared to the Red Bear picks? I also came across the Dunlop Primetone picks also, heard people liked them. I don't play with a lot of gain very often, so I'm wanting to find a pick thats comfortable, good quality, and provides great string feel and tone. I mostly play rock/blues, some mellow solos, etc. I know for a fact the Blue Chip makes a big difference with acoustics, so that decision is made. I guess I'm just curious what the specific benefits of any of these picks I mentioned above would be for my style of playing. What specific benefits would you say you've had with any of this picks?
 
Blue Chip picks are all I use, acoustic or electric.

I like the tone, I like the feel, and they glide through the strings fast without getting hung up.

Try a few picks with your new guitar, you'll see they all elicit subtly different tones, unless you play with a lot of gain, in which case the subtlety will be mostly obscured and none of this matters.

I've been using them for 6-7 years, and I have yet to see any wear at all on one.

I like the feel and tone of picks like the Red Bear, but they do wear, and can't survive an accidental trip through the washing machine without turning into a potato chip.

Like you, I don't lose picks. I still have the Fender mandolin pick I used with my first Martin in 1971. Truth! Though it's worn out, I keep it around for sentimental purposes. 🤣

Ok, I like all that. Is there a specific Blue Chip model you like to use, or suggest for electric guitar playing (rock/blues solos, some chord strumming, etc.)? And have you played Dunlop Primetone? I saw they have one that has a grip feel built into it, and from what I hear a lot of people like the comfort and the feel/tone? Any experience with Primetone? Or how they'd compare to a Blue Chip?
 
If you don't mind me asking, what differences do you fins between the Blue Chip compared to the Red Bear picks? I also came across the Dunlop Primetone picks also, heard people liked them. I don't play with a lot of gain very often, so I'm wanting to find a pick thats comfortable, good quality, and provides great string feel and tone. I mostly play rock/blues, some mellow solos, etc. I know for a fact the Blue Chip makes a big difference with acoustics, so that decision is made. I guess I'm just curious what the specific benefits of any of these picks I mentioned above would be for my style of playing. What specific benefits would you say you've had with any of this picks?
I'm not very good at descriptors, or the specifics of exactly how much difference a pick makes. I just know that I like them. They're comfortable to hold, and I don't drop them. They sound good, and seem to make playing easier. Here are three threads from several years ago that you may find helpful.

 
Ok, I like all that. Is there a specific Blue Chip model you like to use, or suggest for electric guitar playing (rock/blues solos, some chord strumming, etc.)? And have you played Dunlop Primetone? I saw they have one that has a grip feel built into it, and from what I hear a lot of people like the comfort and the feel/tone? Any experience with Primetone? Or how they'd compare to a Blue Chip?
I use several shapes, depending on what I'm doing and how my hands are feeling on the day of a session.

For most things electric, I use the Jazz 35 or Jazz 40. The more pointed tip helps with picking accuracy (and has the side benefit of being short enough that I don't hit the middle pickup on a 3 pickup guitar like the Special).

I also use Jazz 40 and 35 LGs for acoustic solos, where the string spacing is wider and that little bit of extra pick length seems to help.

For strumming I use the traditional teardrop shape TD 35. If my hands are feeling a bit off, I sometimes use a TAD 40 that's shaped like an overweight TD - bigger, somewhat more triangular, and easier to grip because of the added size.

I haven't tried the Primetone - the last Blue Chip I bought was 3 years ago - the things just don't wear out and I have 3-4 for each guitar at this point. So I haven't needed to buy any picks. It ain't broke, I'm not fixin' it! ;)
 
Hey fellow PRS-ians,
Got a topic I've been wanting to throw out to the group. I received my dream Martin guitar recently, and since I got it, and even before I got it, I was doing my research of how to get the best sound of out the guitar. Everything from the pickups, to the amp, to the strings, all the way down to the pick I used. I figured when dropping as much as I did on that acoustic, you want to squeeze every beautiful note out of it that you can, and let me tell you, the hard work paid off. It's the most gorgeous sounding acoustic I've ever played, especially considering all the different choices I made regarding the previously mentioned options. They all were worth the research and investment. Even the pick, as I eluded to. Which brings me to this topic....
The Blue Chip pick for my Martin acoustic made a VERY noticeable difference in the feel, and especially the sound. As you can imagine, since the sound comes directly from the guitar itself, the softer sound the pick makes, results in a better sound from the guitar itself, without the metallic, or clickyness associated with a lot of picks. So the pick was worth every penny imo for this application.
Now I noticed that a lot of people even played Blue Chip picks with electric guitars too, and a lot of PRS owners to be specific, which initially surprised me. I always assumed that with electric guitars, the pick is more about the feel, than the sound it makes, since electric guitars make sound thru electrical amplification methods, which obviously differs from playing an acoustic guitar (unplugged of course). But even a lot of people that used them for electric guitars said that they felt there was a noticeable improvement in the sound with the Blue Chip pick, and now many of them made the change to BC picks for their electrics also. I personally have not had the chance to play a BC pick on an electric yet, so I was hoping to receive some feedback, preferably from anyone who has actually used them on electrics.
Does it make a noticeable difference? Do you feel the improved sound and/or feel is worth the price on an electric guitar? What specific benefits have you found? And for anyone that has played them on an electric that DIDNT think they were worth it, why do you feel that way? What about it did you specifically not like?
Even though they are expensive, I personally have no problem investing $35 on a pick if it's going to improve my feel, sound, tone, etc. Especially considering how long the picks last due to the material they are made of. I'm not someone that gigs all around and loses picks. In fact, I can't remember the last time I lost a pick. So please share your thoughts on the infamous Blue Chip pick for this application, I'm all ears
A hack like me deserves nothing better than PRS bird picks; which I think are really nice.
 
I played Dunlop Primetone picks but switched to the Dunlop Flex picks for the more pointed tip. Both are made of the same material, the main difference is the tip. I also use Cool matrix picks that ring like PRS Core nuts. Those are all so cheap that it's probably worth it to get a couple of sets and see which you like.

Haven't tried Blue Chip yet but it seems that one only hears good about them so probably worth trying.
 
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Different picks make quite a big difference in tone on electric guitars. The thickness and material and even shape/roughness all have an effect on tone.
I've got a couple of blue chip picks - different thickness - and pretty much use them exclusively. I bought them as I'd heard they were really wear resistance, I was fed up with my picks wearing and my technique drifting to accommodate. The blue chip picks just do not seem to wear at all! Heavy use for 5 years and still no sign.
They are pretty pricey, specially imported to the UK but I'd definitely buy them again
 
I use Blue Chip picks for both acoustic and electric. I did try the Primetone picks which are ok, but the Blue Chip picks are clearly superior. I tend use use TD 60 most of the time, but I use a thinner one for acoustic strumming, especially on my 12 fret guitar.
 
You guys bite……on your recommendation now I have to try one and then saw the prices…..I could get a large pizza and wings for less than one pick….
Yes, but that will be gone, and the enjoyment with it, in an hour. The pick will last until slightly less time than the average time it takes you to lose a pick. Which SHOULD be longer than an hour.
 
I have two Blue Chip picks that I use for acoustic and electric guitar. I like them. Like others have said, they don’t seem to wear out. They’re made out of a special plastic named Vespel. It’s very wear resistant - even in thin shapes.

The sound and wear characteristics of the Blue Chip picks got me interested in trying other materials. I’ve kind of gone down the rabbit hole trying out picks made of Torlon, Peek, and UHMWPE from makers like Hufschmid, Purple Plectrums, and Honey Picks. These plastics are also wear resistant and have self lubricating properties. Both Hufschmid and Purple Plectrums specialize in making thicker picks - usually between 5mm - 10mm in width. The thick picks seem to work well on electric guitar, but not so much on acoustic guitar.

As far as I know, Blue Chip is the only manufacturer currently making picks out of Vespel. Honey Picks makes some picks out of Peek. Their picks are similar in thickness to those offered by Blue Chip. I think they work well with both electric and acoustic guitars.
 
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