Black Cherry stain to fix a scar? Can anyone help?

Discussion in 'PTC - PRS Tech Center' started by Threepiece, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Threepiece

    Threepiece New Member

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    Hi,

    I have a 2013 S2 C24 that I purchased recently. When it arrived I discovered it has a huge scar where the wood is raw. I contacted PRS about seeing if I could buy some stain to touch it up but they don't sell it and need $1200 for a refinish. So, that won't work.

    Does anyone have any thoughts or experience buying some colored stain or something for touch ups? I don't need to make it perfect but would like to cover the raw wood. Since I'm color blind this is a tad more challenging for me than some. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. charliefrench

    charliefrench New Member

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    Can you show us some photographs so that we are able to see the extent of the scar?

    If PRS say it needs a complete refinish, how about attempting this yourself? Could be fun.
     
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  3. ADP

    ADP New Member

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    I've repaired a couple of small holes in the finish on the back of a CE-22 using touch-up nitrocellulose paint for guitars. Because the repair is all cherry rather than cherry with a clear coat on top, it's thicker and therefore darker than the original "vintage" cherry finish, but it's better than bare wood.
     
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  4. jimfisher

    jimfisher Guitar Geezer

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    Suggest that you go over to the Gearpage.net and post this under the 'luthiers' section. You should get some pros responding with some ideas.

    Jim
     
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  5. bodia

    bodia Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved

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    Is the scar too big for finger nail polish and superglue? Lots of choices to get you close on color.
     
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  6. Threepiece

    Threepiece New Member

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    [​IMG] Here it is. You all have been so helpful - thanks!
     
  7. charliefrench

    charliefrench New Member

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    [​IMG]

    This might sound crazy but appropriately colored shoe polish might help to make the affected area less obvious. Just wipe on, wipe off with a cloth until it all blends in. Maybe test in a small area first.

    To make good the chip see what Dan Erlewine has to say on the subject.

     
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  8. Threepiece

    Threepiece New Member

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    Thanks! The shoe polish idea sounds pretty smart. Not sure if they make a black cherry color but will check.

    Be well.
     
  9. charliefrench

    charliefrench New Member

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    The shoe polish trick (on all things wood) has been around as long as I have. It is something to consider anyway. The tremolo bridge looks to be set rather low at the front is this intentional?
     
  10. Threepiece

    Threepiece New Member

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    Makes sense. This is the first guitar I've ever had to repair so didn't know.

    This pic was taken before I had it set up. Now it plays beautifully. My guess is it was fixed during set up.
     
  11. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    What you have there is not a "scar". It is wear. "Road wear". Either by a lot of playing, or somebody has tried to relic it. From the looks of the finish closer to the bridge, I'd guess intentional relicing with find sand paper. If you plan to play it a million hours, just keep going, you will put more of the same wear on it. If you want it to be pristine, have the PTC refinish it. If you didn't know it was relic'd you can ask the guy you bought it from for details.
     
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  12. Threepiece

    Threepiece New Member

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    Hi,

    It's a 2013 so play is an unlikely source. Someone else said that it had to be sandpaper as PRS don't wear like that. Don't need it to be pristine, just not so glaring and obtrusive. Not sure why someone would Relic a PRS (not like it's a '56 Strat), but who knows. The folks I got it from were unaware of the mark and have worked hard to make good on the situation. At the end of the day I'll have a S2 that plays and sounds great for $600. Just need a little touch up and all will be well. Thanks.
     
  13. AP515

    AP515 Mostly Normal

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    I agree with you. Great deal on a great guitar. Enjoy it! :)
     
  14. charliefrench

    charliefrench New Member

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    For me it does not look very bad and I would leave it, but in real life it might appear much worse than your photograph shows. And we are not all me, thankfully. Pleased to see you got it set up and playing nicely anyway.
     
  15. Bill SAS 513

    Bill SAS 513 Just another old guy in a T-shirt

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    First of all...Nice axe...and I've done a few small spot repairs using that exact Dan Erlewine video method .
    But I'm with the leave it camp, unless it really bugs you...markers/patch paint(for auto or guitar)/crazy glue/polish would make it much less noticeable.
    Enjoy, and Congrats!!!
     
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  16. ADP

    ADP New Member

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    I don't think I'd even attempt to repair that. What you could do though is stain it. Try an appropriate colour on some similar coloured mahogany first to make sure you like the way it turns out. Remember to let it dry on your test piece before you do it for real. Or you could just live with it. Relics are born; not created.
     

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