Amp/Guitar You Want To Get Rid Of But Can't.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by tabl10s, May 28, 2020.

  1. tabl10s

    tabl10s New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2012
    Messages:
    731
    Likes Received:
    87
    My '77 Strat. My mother bought it when I was 15 and even though it's garbage, it's the longest thing I've owned.

    I bought fully-loaded Mk IIC the day I made Sergeant on 1 Oct 83. I was 21 and strong(traded a Mk 1 stack I bought two years earlier). I drove to the factory to have it upgraded to "+" status six years ago and have only used it for 30 minutes. Moving it is a hassle, but it's a part of my past.
     
    dogrocketp, bodia and veinbuster like this.
  2. Tucson Thump

    Tucson Thump Mint Heavy Relic

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2017
    Messages:
    1,962
    Likes Received:
    3,342
    I can understand the amp, but the Strat from Mom? Never get rid of love.
     
    dogrocketp and Bill SAS 513 like this.
  3. Tahlee

    Tahlee Tollywood Rhode Island

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2015
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    797
    My ‘76 SG Custom.

    It’s tattooed on my arm and my kids freaked when I mentioned selling it some years ago. So, I’ll never play it but I’ll always have it. I’ve owned it for about 25-30 years. Used to be my #1.
     
    dogrocketp and Bill SAS 513 like this.
  4. sergiodeblanc

    sergiodeblanc I like to party, mmm hmm, everybody does.

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2012
    Messages:
    21,696
    Likes Received:
    35,595
    Nothing. I wanna keep ‘em all! Hell, I want your stuff too!
     
  5. Going Modal

    Going Modal I should be practicing right now.

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2019
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    122
    My Les Paul, after getting my McCarty. No joke... not just saying this because it's this forum. My MC-58 with 57/08's is everything my LP wishes it could be if it ever grows up & becomes more mature.

    And it's no "lowly" Gibson model either--on the contrary, it's a 20-teens LP Traditional that I upgraded all the hardware & electronics on, including Lollar Imperials and real pots & wiring. Pretty much sounds like a very good LP (maybe not THE best, but whatever) which quite honestly translates to, "It sounds great sometimes, but it also has its faults."

    Can't get rid of it, though, because well I've got a couple Strats, couple Teles... and it's a legit Les Paul.
     
    dogrocketp likes this.
  6. 11top

    11top Cousin Eddie's cousin

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2012
    Messages:
    7,924
    Likes Received:
    20,835
    I have a ‘76 Gibson LP Custom black beauty I bought brand new. It’s still in excellent condition, but weighs a ton and has a ‘60 skinny neck which I don’t really like. But it’s my first really nice new electric I ever bought, and it’s the year of my marriage. How can I part with that even though I never play it anymore?
     
    dogrocketp and Alnus Rubra like this.
  7. CandidPicker

    CandidPicker Open-Ears / Zippered Lips

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2019
    Messages:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    2,420
    It's mostly a matter of choosing what works for you, and if it doesn't, maybe you don't bond with it. Although my guitars are things I own, I don't place a value on something just because it belongs to me. There'd have to be some strong sentimental or emotional bond that occurred when first receiving the guitar.

    And, TBH, You give a boy a ball to play with, he'll enjoy that until something else piques his short-term interest. My feeling is the same, once the novelty of owning something new wears off, I prefer to resist the temptation of GAS for something else, and still have a ball.

    Think of this: When you buy a ring for your intended wife, that ring is supposed to represent your faithfulness and loyalty to her until you die. No wiggle room, really.

    However, for the sake of convenience, I also realize that I'm not married to what I own, so there is also a freedom to up or downgrade to whatever newer model you so choose. My feeling is more akin to owning a car. You drive it, you maintain it, you try to keep it clean. Eventually, the lifetime of the car will be part of the high-mileage club, and you'll think it's time for a new car. Perhaps that is how I should approach owning a guitar. Structurally and operationally sound, except for some patina, dings and dents.

    That's when I'd consider parting with a guitar, once it's been driven, loved, and played. Then someone else can enjoy the guitar, though its no longer in factory-fresh condition.

    P.S. Don't consider trading in your wife for a newer model. Unless you want your wife to be like horror movie car, 'Christine,' you'd be smart to take care of your wife so she doesn't come looking for you in horrific fashion.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice