594 vs. Tremonti. Thoughts?

Utkarsh

A Les Paul guy who loves PRSs
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
Messages
351
Location
Singapore
So I'm a long term Les Paul and then 594 player who recently fell in love with a Artist Pack Tremonti I acquired recently.
So these are my thoughts..articulated in more detail in my video below.
Different strokes for different folks
594: high quality, high definition 'vintage' Les Paul
Tremonti: hot rodded Les Paul aka like a Super Strat version of one

That Tremonti has jumped to #1 in my stable, but with a broader view, can't pick a winner. Thoughts anyone?

 

Mozzi

https://imgur.com/user/BAMozzy/posts
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
3,280
As I commented on your PRS Tremonti Review: The Super Les Paul Video, the two, whilst arguably are 'similar', they are also very different beasts. The 594 remit was to make a 'classic' 58 Les Paul because Paul would talk about 58 Les Pauls and none of his audience had ever played a 58 Les Paul, just the re-issues. Because of their price, their availability and rarity, its understandable that very very few people actually get to play a vintage Les Paul

The 594 was born out of that. From the 'Vintage' neck carve, the 58/15 LT's and of course the switch/pots arrangement - even the scale length is more accurate to the originals (I believe). Of course PRS add their own modern twist with locking tuners and the coil splitting - as well as the consistency and quality they are known for.

The Tremonti is, as you say, a hot-rodded Les Paul. Its remit is the requirements of Mark Tremonti, what he needs to make the type of music he plays. Its a lot more 'modern'. It has a Trem Bridge too - something that is not very 'Les Paul' and has a 25" scale length too. I believe it has the Pattern Thin neck as standard and of course the 'Tremonti' Pick-ups. I don't know exactly where the Temonti PU's fit, whether they are hotter than most or more vintage voiced. Its irrelevant in the whole scheme of things because the guitar itself is still a very different and much more 'modern' instrument in general compared to a more 'vintage' (classic maybe better because the instrument isn't old) 594.

I couldn't personally pick between the two. On the one hand you have a vintage/classic LP style guitar compared to a Musicians much more modern needs and PRS built signature guitar built loosely around a LP structure. Its like trying to pick between a Silver Sky and an Ibanez Jem - ones a 'classic' 63/64 strat type instrument and the other is a much more modern 24 fret 'super' strat built for a 'musician' specific needs - both have the same scale length and has some commonality but, like the 594 and Tremonti, you can easily make a case for owning both - one more of a classic built more of a 'general' instrument and the other much more of a modern musicians requirements, hence a 'signature' model.

I know the Silver Sky is a 'signature' model of sorts but its still designed to be a 'classic' Strat for all musicians that can't get a 63/4 Strat and John Mayer didn't want it to be a signature of sorts more of a collaboration with PRS to make a 'unicorn' guitar so that he, and everyone doesn't have to go looking for 'the one'. Both it and the 594 are 'classic' guitars with modern features (like locking tuners) and the quality and consistency that PRS have.

Because they are so different, with different remits, you can own both without feeling like they are too similar (other than the PRS quality) that you can only have one or the other. Of course if you prefer a more classic or more modern vibe, that can influence your decision on which to buy, keep and/or sell...
 

Utkarsh

A Les Paul guy who loves PRSs
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
Messages
351
Location
Singapore
As I commented on your PRS Tremonti Review: The Super Les Paul Video, the two, whilst arguably are 'similar', they are also very different beasts. The 594 remit was to make a 'classic' 58 Les Paul because Paul would talk about 58 Les Pauls and none of his audience had ever played a 58 Les Paul, just the re-issues. Because of their price, their availability and rarity, its understandable that very very few people actually get to play a vintage Les Paul

The 594 was born out of that. From the 'Vintage' neck carve, the 58/15 LT's and of course the switch/pots arrangement - even the scale length is more accurate to the originals (I believe). Of course PRS add their own modern twist with locking tuners and the coil splitting - as well as the consistency and quality they are known for.

The Tremonti is, as you say, a hot-rodded Les Paul. Its remit is the requirements of Mark Tremonti, what he needs to make the type of music he plays. Its a lot more 'modern'. It has a Trem Bridge too - something that is not very 'Les Paul' and has a 25" scale length too. I believe it has the Pattern Thin neck as standard and of course the 'Tremonti' Pick-ups. I don't know exactly where the Temonti PU's fit, whether they are hotter than most or more vintage voiced. Its irrelevant in the whole scheme of things because the guitar itself is still a very different and much more 'modern' instrument in general compared to a more 'vintage' (classic maybe better because the instrument isn't old) 594.

I couldn't personally pick between the two. On the one hand you have a vintage/classic LP style guitar compared to a Musicians much more modern needs and PRS built signature guitar built loosely around a LP structure. Its like trying to pick between a Silver Sky and an Ibanez Jem - ones a 'classic' 63/64 strat type instrument and the other is a much more modern 24 fret 'super' strat built for a 'musician' specific needs - both have the same scale length and has some commonality but, like the 594 and Tremonti, you can easily make a case for owning both - one more of a classic built more of a 'general' instrument and the other much more of a modern musicians requirements, hence a 'signature' model.

I know the Silver Sky is a 'signature' model of sorts but its still designed to be a 'classic' Strat for all musicians that can't get a 63/4 Strat and John Mayer didn't want it to be a signature of sorts more of a collaboration with PRS to make a 'unicorn' guitar so that he, and everyone doesn't have to go looking for 'the one'. Both it and the 594 are 'classic' guitars with modern features (like locking tuners) and the quality and consistency that PRS have.

Because they are so different, with different remits, you can own both without feeling like they are too similar (other than the PRS quality) that you can only have one or the other. Of course if you prefer a more classic or more modern vibe, that can influence your decision on which to buy, keep and/or sell...
Decided to keep both:) you are right, The 594 is different enough that you have both. But I will say that they are not as dissimilar as a JEM is to a Silver sky or Strat. The Tremonti can easily replace a Les Paul (unless one absolutely detests the trem) but the JEM can't do that to a strat
 
Last edited:

jvin248

New Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2013
Messages
157
.

Tremonti has vacuum waxed pickups and would hold up a lot better in high gain stage gigs, the 594 is likely only wax dipped/soaked (I heard when I was at the factory only Tremonti and Holcomb models get vacuum potted).

The down side with the Tremonti model (or any of the artist signature models) is if you ever want to sell, you need to find both a PRS fan and then also a Tremonti fan ... and that significantly reduces the potential buyer interest.


.
 

bodia

Authorities said.....best leave it.....unsolved
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
28,472
Location
Suburban Chicago
I think you nailed the description. Old school....594. Heavy metal beast.....Tremonti. Similar guitars in body shape only.
 

FunkyFreeman

Moo Panuwat
Joined
Aug 15, 2012
Messages
312
Location
Bangkok, Thailand
They're very different despite having the same body shape. I tried core Tremonti and a 594 (DC) and to me it's really difficult to tell which one I like the best. The clean and low-mid gain tones of 594 is so classy and have tons of clarity like none of other 'vintage' instruments can offer. In the other hands the Tremonti excels in performance - it's neck profile is very fast and the high gain is what it's born for.

IMHO, buy them both, hahaha.
 

Paz

New Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2019
Messages
107
I really liked the Tremonti but I wanted more versatility so I got a cu24 instead.
 

Ovibos

Naughty Wood Librarian
Joined
Jan 9, 2015
Messages
2,685
Location
Wilmette, IL
.
The down side with the Tremonti model (or any of the artist signature models) is if you ever want to sell, you need to find both a PRS fan and then also a Tremonti fan ... and that significantly reduces the potential buyer interest.
I disagree with this. I think the Tremonti is the hard rock/metal utility player of the lineup and likely sells just as much (or more) on that than on his name.

This is probably true to a lesser degree with models that have stuck around, like the Zach Myers.
 
Top